What does it take to get a full ride/significant scholarship?

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LawSchoolSucker
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Joined: Fri Oct 21, 2016 10:12 pm

What does it take to get a full ride/significant scholarship?

Postby LawSchoolSucker » Fri Oct 21, 2016 10:34 pm

Hey all,

I've been seriously considering attending law school to pursue a career in public interest advocacy. As I've thought through the process, I've become determined that I'd only want to attend law school if I can do it with no debt (or as little debt as possible, low five figures at the most). I'd be curious to get other people's input on what it takes to attend law school with little to no debt.

I had a 3.92 GPA at a top-30 undergraduate institution and a 170 LSAT (I'm retaking it so it could be higher, but I'm definitely not counting on it). I've done some research on civil rights law that was published in an undergraduate journal (nothing that important or big) and worked at multiple organizations focused on poverty and environmentalism.

Would that profile make a full ride/significant scholarship at a T14 law school possible? Are there specific schools that are more likely to give full rides? Would targeting T30 schools that can provide a full ride be worth it? Is it only the top law schools (Harvard, Yale, Standford) that provide loan forgiveness programs that would make attending law school essentially debt free for someone pursuing a career in public interest law?

Thanks for any advice, I'm very uncertain about the process but committed to the idea that I can NOT go into debt when pursuing this career.

cavalier1138
Posts: 4316
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:01 pm

Re: What does it take to get a full ride/significant scholarship?

Postby cavalier1138 » Sat Oct 22, 2016 8:19 am

In general, it takes at least one of your numbers being over the school's 75th percentile to get good money, with a stronger emphasis on LSAT being over that. If both numbers are significantly over, then a full ride starts to become likely.

But you're right to be looking at the LRAP as well, because in public interest work, that basically functions like a scholarship after the fact. In a highly competitive field like civil rights, I'd shoot for going to a more reputable school with less scholarship money as long as they have a decent LRAP program.

Pretty much all the T14 schools have something in place for loan forgiveness. But they all have slightly different versions of the program. Off the top of my head, HYS, Columbia and NYU are known for having pretty stellar LRAP options. There was a thread from last year on this topic that I recommend checking out: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=262492

The spreadsheet gives a good breakdown of all the LRAP programs in the T14.

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airwrecka
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Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 1:54 pm

Re: What does it take to get a full ride/significant scholarship?

Postby airwrecka » Tue Oct 25, 2016 4:21 pm

LawSchoolSucker wrote:Hey all,

I've been seriously considering attending law school to pursue a career in public interest advocacy. As I've thought through the process, I've become determined that I'd only want to attend law school if I can do it with no debt (or as little debt as possible, low five figures at the most). I'd be curious to get other people's input on what it takes to attend law school with little to no debt.

I had a 3.92 GPA at a top-30 undergraduate institution and a 170 LSAT (I'm retaking it so it could be higher, but I'm definitely not counting on it). I've done some research on civil rights law that was published in an undergraduate journal (nothing that important or big) and worked at multiple organizations focused on poverty and environmentalism.

Would that profile make a full ride/significant scholarship at a T14 law school possible? Are there specific schools that are more likely to give full rides? Would targeting T30 schools that can provide a full ride be worth it? Is it only the top law schools (Harvard, Yale, Standford) that provide loan forgiveness programs that would make attending law school essentially debt free for someone pursuing a career in public interest law?

Thanks for any advice, I'm very uncertain about the process but committed to the idea that I can NOT go into debt when pursuing this career.


You and I are verrrrry similar (my numbers are 3.9/170, although I am not retaking the LSAT) and I also want to go into public interest. Have you looked at the Root-Tilden-Kern scholarship at NYU? I applied for it, although since it's a full ride, I'm not getting my hopes up too high. Something to look into, though!

cavalier1138
Posts: 4316
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:01 pm

Re: What does it take to get a full ride/significant scholarship?

Postby cavalier1138 » Tue Oct 25, 2016 5:41 pm

airwrecka wrote:
LawSchoolSucker wrote:Hey all,

I've been seriously considering attending law school to pursue a career in public interest advocacy. As I've thought through the process, I've become determined that I'd only want to attend law school if I can do it with no debt (or as little debt as possible, low five figures at the most). I'd be curious to get other people's input on what it takes to attend law school with little to no debt.

I had a 3.92 GPA at a top-30 undergraduate institution and a 170 LSAT (I'm retaking it so it could be higher, but I'm definitely not counting on it). I've done some research on civil rights law that was published in an undergraduate journal (nothing that important or big) and worked at multiple organizations focused on poverty and environmentalism.

Would that profile make a full ride/significant scholarship at a T14 law school possible? Are there specific schools that are more likely to give full rides? Would targeting T30 schools that can provide a full ride be worth it? Is it only the top law schools (Harvard, Yale, Standford) that provide loan forgiveness programs that would make attending law school essentially debt free for someone pursuing a career in public interest law?

Thanks for any advice, I'm very uncertain about the process but committed to the idea that I can NOT go into debt when pursuing this career.


You and I are verrrrry similar (my numbers are 3.9/170, although I am not retaking the LSAT) and I also want to go into public interest. Have you looked at the Root-Tilden-Kern scholarship at NYU? I applied for it, although since it's a full ride, I'm not getting my hopes up too high. Something to look into, though!


Just a note about the Root (and other named scholarships at NYU). You just need to get in. Once you're in, your numbers have nothing to do with your chances at getting those scholarships, because those committees decide based on your demonstrated commitment to the field (or in the case of AnBryce, your personal story).

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airwrecka
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Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 1:54 pm

Re: What does it take to get a full ride/significant scholarship?

Postby airwrecka » Tue Oct 25, 2016 5:56 pm

cavalier1138 wrote:
Just a note about the Root (and other named scholarships at NYU). You just need to get in. Once you're in, your numbers have nothing to do with your chances at getting those scholarships, because those committees decide based on your demonstrated commitment to the field (or in the case of AnBryce, your personal story).


I realize that :) But I know they want "diversity" in the scholars, and I'm a white, upper-middle-class girl from WI and while I am very committed to pursuing public interest law, I have a feeling there will probably be a lot of more impressive applicants (who are also more diverse than me).

cavalier1138
Posts: 4316
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:01 pm

Re: What does it take to get a full ride/significant scholarship?

Postby cavalier1138 » Wed Oct 26, 2016 5:06 am

airwrecka wrote:
cavalier1138 wrote:
Just a note about the Root (and other named scholarships at NYU). You just need to get in. Once you're in, your numbers have nothing to do with your chances at getting those scholarships, because those committees decide based on your demonstrated commitment to the field (or in the case of AnBryce, your personal story).


I realize that :) But I know they want "diversity" in the scholars, and I'm a white, upper-middle-class girl from WI and while I am very committed to pursuing public interest law, I have a feeling there will probably be a lot of more impressive applicants (who are also more diverse than me).


Diversity is always a goal, but I think it's more directly the goal with AnBryce than with Root. Either way, your numbers won't have any effect on whether you're considered if they're good enough to get you admitted. For the Root scholarships, they mainly want to see commitment to PI.




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