Diversity Statement Samples

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
mark_gg_daniels
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2013 8:45 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby mark_gg_daniels » Mon Jan 06, 2014 12:42 am

Anyone with a disability related DS?

xmbeckham
Posts: 61
Joined: Sun Oct 13, 2013 10:36 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby xmbeckham » Thu Jan 09, 2014 8:04 am

anyone looking to swap DS?

Cthon
Posts: 29
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 1:15 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby Cthon » Sat Jan 11, 2014 11:58 pm

xmbeckham wrote:anyone looking to swap DS?

I'm willing to swap if you still need someone. Let me know.

On one hand, I'd love a wide array of feedback on my diversity statement. The people who post there's directly seem to get the most feedback. On the other hand, I don't think it's safe to just put your material on the internet for anyone to run across. (Lol I plagiarized myself one time. Had to explain to my teacher that this person whose essay I copied from the internet was me. Funny story)

Would anyone be willing to read/critique my Diversity Statement via PM?
Pretty pleassse.

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Atmosphere
Posts: 489
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby Atmosphere » Tue Oct 07, 2014 12:09 am

If anyone is looking to swap statements, inbox me!

TedPhatana
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:59 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby TedPhatana » Mon Jan 26, 2015 9:16 pm

Hi Folks, new poster here, feel free to critique mine:


My Laotian name Patana means “What you wish for, you get” thankfully, besides unanswered attempts, I have taken away more than that from my ethnic background. Laotian culture teaches you to respect your elders, regardless of any type of status. I apply this universally; for example, at work, I usually know as much about the family background of the janitorial staff as I do with people I directly work with. Since my parents taught me to always be helpful to strangers, I have become an adept tire changer and car jumper for random motorists. I can also say “You can eat with your hands” confidently because sticky rice is the main food staple of Laos, and we eat more of it than anyone else in the world.

My family was sponsored by Christian to come to the US. Being thankful of our sponsors, my parents enrolled me in Sunday school where I learned about Jesus Christ and his teachings, which inspire me to this day. Yet my parents were raised as Buddhists, so I also attended Saturday Buddhist rituals at the Temple where I would chant with the monks. Growing up as a Buddhist-Christian helped me to appreciate the different religions of the US and fostered self-awareness by allowing me to find my own life-enriching value in each of those two religions.

I also understand that intelligence can be applied physically as well as mentally. I had a career as an amateur and sometimes professional boxer. In my opinion, you’re a better boxer when you are calm, as opposed to boxing with anger; with a clear mind you can work your jab to measure your opponent and intelligently pick power shots from a distance. The best boxers treat the sport as a physical game of chess and I have come to respect the sport for more than the punching aspect. This experience has made me cognizant of the talent and intellect others may possess, even if it’s not obvious on the surface.

Having grown up in a culture with less than 250,000 people in the US helps me appreciate the value I can add to American diversity. I am delighted to share the customs of the Laos people with whomever I run into, whether it’s introducing them to a very spicy dish of “Papaya Salad” created from my mother’s recipe, showing my neighbor how to position his hands while dancing to Lao folk music, or even teaching a coworker some Laotian words. The enjoyment I receive from opening the eyes of my fellow Americans to this beautiful heritage reminds me of why the US is known for its ability to absorb many cultures and the happiness to be gained from the respect and appreciation of that distinctiveness.

Harvette
Posts: 265
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 2:21 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby Harvette » Thu Jan 29, 2015 2:22 am

TedPhatana wrote:Hi Folks, new poster here, feel free to critique mine:


My Laotian name Patana means “What you wish for, you get” thankfully, besides unanswered attempts, I have taken away more than that from my ethnic background. Laotian culture teaches you to respect your elders, regardless of any type of status. I apply this universally; for example, at work, I usually know as much about the family background of the janitorial staff as I do with people I directly work with. Since my parents taught me to always be helpful to strangers, I have become an adept tire changer and car jumper for random motorists. I can also say “You can eat with your hands” confidently because sticky rice is the main food staple of Laos, and we eat more of it than anyone else in the world.

My family was sponsored by Christian to come to the US. Being thankful of our sponsors, my parents enrolled me in Sunday school where I learned about Jesus Christ and his teachings, which inspire me to this day. Yet my parents were raised as Buddhists, so I also attended Saturday Buddhist rituals at the Temple where I would chant with the monks. Growing up as a Buddhist-Christian helped me to appreciate the different religions of the US and fostered self-awareness by allowing me to find my own life-enriching value in each of those two religions.

I also understand that intelligence can be applied physically as well as mentally. I had a career as an amateur and sometimes professional boxer. In my opinion, you’re a better boxer when you are calm, as opposed to boxing with anger; with a clear mind you can work your jab to measure your opponent and intelligently pick power shots from a distance. The best boxers treat the sport as a physical game of chess and I have come to respect the sport for more than the punching aspect. This experience has made me cognizant of the talent and intellect others may possess, even if it’s not obvious on the surface.

Having grown up in a culture with less than 250,000 people in the US helps me appreciate the value I can add to American diversity. I am delighted to share the customs of the Laos people with whomever I run into, whether it’s introducing them to a very spicy dish of “Papaya Salad” created from my mother’s recipe, showing my neighbor how to position his hands while dancing to Lao folk music, or even teaching a coworker some Laotian words. The enjoyment I receive from opening the eyes of my fellow Americans to this beautiful heritage reminds me of why the US is known for its ability to absorb many cultures and the happiness to be gained from the respect and appreciation of that distinctiveness.


You are trying to cover too much here. It ends up lacking structure. If I were u I would focus on one aspect of diversity. I think the christian/Buddhist experience might be interesting.

160_and_Above
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Oct 09, 2014 3:58 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby 160_and_Above » Thu Jan 29, 2015 11:23 am

“Man, why are you acting White?” Throughout my encounters with classmates from elementary school to college, I faced questions similar to this. At the age of 10, I didn’t realize my upbringing was different than some of my peers. My mother and father worked full-time jobs, while my father served as a pastor. I also attended private school my entire life. My parents would always tell me, due to my skin color, people would expect me to fulfill certain stereotypes for African Americans. Shortly after, I found this to be sadly true. My peers would seem very surprised when they heard me speak aloud. I didn’t understand when I was younger, but it started to make more sense as I grew older. Most of my classmates expected me to live up to the African American stereotypes, such as lack of ambition in school, wearing baggy clothes, and failing to enunciate my words in conversation.

Many of my friends in my neighborhood were African American. They would constantly tease me regarding my knowledge, demeanor, and choice of clothing. The groupthink phenomenon was always in effect when I engaged in conversation with these guys. To make matters worse, being labeled as a “pastor’s kid” encouraged them to hold me to the highest standard of measure in a joking fashion. At my school, I dealt with many African American- and non-African American peers’ judgments and dissatisfaction in regards to my personality and accomplishments. It seemed difficult for most of them to see an African American excel academically. Although I was fairly good at sports in school, I never wanted sports to be my only skill to propel me into college and beyond.
I believe graduating number two in my high school class allowed my classmates and other grades below to actually see an African American be successful in sports and school. State championships were great memories, but I knew academics would hold more weight in the future.

This same attitude carried me through my undergraduate years. I expected people to somewhat have the same perceptions of me, but on a grander scale. Sadly again, this became true. I welcomed the challenge to be the best student I could be and learn from others at the same time. Throughout my political science courses, I was one of the few African American students who readily engaged in class discussions and contributed to group projects. My peers, both African American and non-African American, would look at me in perplexity. From those moments, I gained their respect as well as new friendships along the way.

I enjoyed taking on the challenge of defying stereotypes, even today as I currently work in a tax law firm in Fort Worth. A majority of people may see this as a minor experience, but experiencing this treatment for my whole life has served a major role in my upbringing. My experience as an African American male has definitely made me mentally stronger, appreciative of diversity, and proud to not be labeled as another statistic in the justice system. I gladly take on this challenge every time I am encountered with it. I believe those encounters help myself and the other person(s) re-evaluate their perception of people, which encourages better relationships and respect for one another.
Being an African American male will always be a part of me. I am very thankful for my experiences, even though they served as difficult times I couldn’t fully understand at an early age. The more opportunities I have to interact with others and influence their perception of people similar to me - whether the topic is being a male, African American, law student, or even a judge – will better serve the knowledge and level of respect in our society. Therefore, I will always strive to motivate people who may face the same treatment to be proud of who they are and utilize their untapped potential.

TedPhatana
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:59 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby TedPhatana » Sat Feb 21, 2015 5:54 pm

Harvette wrote:
TedPhatana wrote:Hi Folks, new poster here, feel free to critique mine:


My Laotian name Patana means “What you wish for, you get” thankfully, besides unanswered attempts, I have taken away more than that from my ethnic background. Laotian culture teaches you to respect your elders, regardless of any type of status. I apply this universally; for example, at work, I usually know as much about the family background of the janitorial staff as I do with people I directly work with. Since my parents taught me to always be helpful to strangers, I have become an adept tire changer and car jumper for random motorists. I can also say “You can eat with your hands” confidently because sticky rice is the main food staple of Laos, and we eat more of it than anyone else in the world.

My family was sponsored by Christian to come to the US. Being thankful of our sponsors, my parents enrolled me in Sunday school where I learned about Jesus Christ and his teachings, which inspire me to this day. Yet my parents were raised as Buddhists, so I also attended Saturday Buddhist rituals at the Temple where I would chant with the monks. Growing up as a Buddhist-Christian helped me to appreciate the different religions of the US and fostered self-awareness by allowing me to find my own life-enriching value in each of those two religions.

I also understand that intelligence can be applied physically as well as mentally. I had a career as an amateur and sometimes professional boxer. In my opinion, you’re a better boxer when you are calm, as opposed to boxing with anger; with a clear mind you can work your jab to measure your opponent and intelligently pick power shots from a distance. The best boxers treat the sport as a physical game of chess and I have come to respect the sport for more than the punching aspect. This experience has made me cognizant of the talent and intellect others may possess, even if it’s not obvious on the surface.

Having grown up in a culture with less than 250,000 people in the US helps me appreciate the value I can add to American diversity. I am delighted to share the customs of the Laos people with whomever I run into, whether it’s introducing them to a very spicy dish of “Papaya Salad” created from my mother’s recipe, showing my neighbor how to position his hands while dancing to Lao folk music, or even teaching a coworker some Laotian words. The enjoyment I receive from opening the eyes of my fellow Americans to this beautiful heritage reminds me of why the US is known for its ability to absorb many cultures and the happiness to be gained from the respect and appreciation of that distinctiveness.


You are trying to cover too much here. It ends up lacking structure. If I were u I would focus on one aspect of diversity. I think the christian/Buddhist experience might be interesting.


Thanks I got through a couple of edits and submitted already so far I got:

10k from widener law
54k from Rutgers Camden
Waiting for responses from my other apps

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dasani13
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby dasani13 » Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:53 pm

If anyone needs an example of a LGBTQ DS I'd be glad to PM mine.

ungendered
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Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 7:36 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby ungendered » Thu Jul 16, 2015 7:56 pm

dasani13 wrote:If anyone needs an example of a LGBTQ DS I'd be glad to PM mine.


Please do!!! I am going to post mine to get some critique.

ungendered
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 7:36 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby ungendered » Thu Jul 16, 2015 7:58 pm

Please critique and I would love to critique back. Tell me what works, what doesn't, what's too long, too short. This is goign to be my diversity statement for penn - so I think I need to cut back some sections and talk more at the end about diversity at penn. this is my very first draft.



Twenty years ago my parents gave me the wrong name by mistake - and the doctors slipped up and told them that I would grow up to be a girl. My room was painted pink. Barbies were purchased. I was dressed with an excess of frills, bows and pastel colors - that is until I had a say in the matter. Once I was old enough to voice my mind, I was only ever seen wearing my brother’s hand me down clothes and hanging upside from the tallest tree branches I could grasp. I would play in the woods until dusk everyday and refused to brush my “rat’s nest” of hair, as my mother would so lovingly call it. I hated brushing it, washing it and worst off all, wearing it in a way except in a ponytail. Yet, when I did decide to go for it and just cut it all off in high school, I did not find the world to be particularly receptive of me and my short hair.

It was then that I realized that the world saw me as something I simply was not, a girl. But at the same time, I knew I wasn’t a boy either. I just knew I was myself - an androgynous, bibliophile, with an insatiable love for school, parrots, knitting and coffee. However, I didn’t know how to quite be myself in a world that told me that just because of my chromosomes I had to use a certain bathroom and I had shop in a certain section of the department store. Consequently, I graduated high school with the wrong name printed on my diploma and was too dejected by that fact to even walk at my own graduation.

But my college diploma will have my actual name written on it: Monick W. Perone. I will hang it lovingly on the most visible wall of my home or my future office, as a daily reminder that you need not sacrifice yourself for the sake of success. In college, instead of feeling insecure about my queerness and hiding it, I came out and let it shine. I started my own personal mission to make Moravian College as safe, friendly and inclusive as possible for all transgender students. I started my mission big in the President’s office, where I advocated for a policy change that would allow transgender students to change their names on class rosters and student ID’s before they had their name’s legally changed. The President seemed apprehensive, because initiating such a policy would mean altering our computer software systems, a seemingly large task. I didn’t let that affect the outcome though, because that afternoon I called forty other colleges who already had this policy in place to see if they could help. Finally, I found that Pitzer College had such a policy in place, had the same exact computer software system as us, and was willing to help. I transmitted this information to the President and the policy was approved and implemented in a mere matter of weeks. I finally had an ID that I wasn’t embarrassed to use in the dining hall.

I quickly became the most visible trans student on our small campus, but I knew I wasn’t the only trans student at Moravian and I wanted to use my visibility to benefit the Moravian LGBTQ+ community as much as possible. I reorganized our Gay Straight Alliance and applied for and received full club status - something that our GSA had never seen before at Moravian College. I presented at Undergraduate Conferences on trans issues and even guest starred on our small college radio station, which for me at the time was a huge step. I no longer had to put on a performance every day when I stepped out into the world. I no longer had to lie to everyone I knew and loved. I no longer feared that I would have to sacrifice my identity for respect and acceptance. I only want to continue moving forward into accepting environments where I will not feel ashamed of my identity and I will be able to bring my experiences forth to enrich the lives of others and be enriched by the diversity of my peers.

CanadianWolf
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby CanadianWolf » Thu Jul 16, 2015 8:33 pm

Very weak concluding sentence; thought that you would have learned how to deal with all types of environments--whether accepting or not.

Awkward use of the word "big" regarding your first meeting with the university/college president.

Otherwise, this is a well constructed, easy-to-read statement.

ungendered
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby ungendered » Thu Jul 16, 2015 10:33 pm

CanadianWolf wrote:Very weak concluding sentence; thought that you would have learned how to deal with all types of environments--whether accepting or not.

Awkward use of the word "big" regarding your first meeting with the university/college president.

Otherwise, this is a well constructed, easy-to-read statement.



Thanks so much for the advice. And you are right - I have no idea how to end it as of right now - I feel like I want to tie the fact that Upenn is super diverse into into it - but I am going to have to try out a few different options!

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cphtexas
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby cphtexas » Mon Oct 05, 2015 3:08 pm

Does anyone have advice on whether or not to write a DS about losing a parent to suicide? I do not qualify as a URM and didn't want to write my PS about the subject, but I wanted to address it in some form since it had a significant impact on my life.

nikey11!
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2015 9:15 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby nikey11! » Tue Jan 05, 2016 1:35 pm

When writing a Diversity Statement, can I just assume that the reader will have also read my Personal Statement? I worry that if I give background information again, the two essays will seem repetitive.

LoveNicky
Posts: 1
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby LoveNicky » Wed Feb 24, 2016 2:26 am

cphtexas wrote:Does anyone have advice on whether or not to write a DS about losing a parent to suicide? I do not qualify as a URM and didn't want to write my PS about the subject, but I wanted to address it in some form since it had a significant impact on my life.


That is underrepresented topic and I think that would make an amazing diversity statement!

DantesInferno
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2016 5:36 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby DantesInferno » Sun Mar 06, 2016 6:34 pm

Hey, guys. Bored on spring break and making preparations for this autumn's law school applications. Any feedback is appreciated!

“If you’re not low-crawling in five seconds, f*****, we’ll have a huge issue.” So went my worst night in the Army. 24-hour guard duty is never pleasant; the arrival of a drunk, angry sergeant at 3:00 a.m. transformed a routine inconvenience into a nightmare. As a low-ranking enlisted soldier, I had little choice but to low-crawl on a filthy barracks floor. My tormentor’s massive size alone intimidated me into compliance. His repeated grunts of “queer” and “f*****” aired over me. The on-duty supervisor soon came to my rescue, but the damage was done. My unit began to treat me as a victim and an outsider. The incident, and the tense months that followed, shattered my confidence as a gay man.

My sense of shock was amplified by ten fairly uneventful years out of the closet. After coming out at 13 (my mother asked me directly), my high school years in the Philadelphia suburbs passed happily. Family, peers, and teachers alike supported me. My stepfather (a Lutheran pastor) wore a rainbow stole at church during Pride Month. College proved a more difficult time; I spent three unsuccessful years at three separate schools. My tenure in the Army followed. Personal challenges aside, my sexual orientation never mattered. My unit valued my skills as a soldier and a medic; I was never treated as “the gay guy.” The night I was harassed changed everything. After my supervisor and I filed a report, others stopped seeing me as Dante. I became the token gay soldier. My unit’s leadership continually asked if I was comfortable. I wouldn’t have minded if they asked privately, but the questions came most frequently in front of patients. My peers treated me as if I was fragile – a huge impediment to someone responsible for their well-being. Friends stopped joking around with me, out of fear that they too would be punished. Personally and professionally, I learned what it was to be a victim and an outsider.

Many in the LGBTQ+ community feel as professionally isolated as I did during my last few months as a soldier. True, the Army is a unique environment. Many soldiers fear demotion and discharge, and will avoid a whistleblower simply to minimize risk. Fortunately, the Army protects LGBTQ+ soldiers from discharge based on sexual orientation. My concern is for LGBTQ+ civilians marginalized for living openly. 18 states allow businesses to fire employees solely for being LGBTQ+. These people fear honest self-identification and are forced to deceive employers. As a fair-minded American, I believe that professional merit alone determines one’s worthiness for a job. Sexual orientation, while of enormous personal significance, cannot affect job performance.

My discharge came as a huge relief. Army regulations aside, academia is much more welcoming than the military. As a member of Kutztown University’s Lambda Delta Xi Diaternity, I work to unify LGBTQ+ students and allies through community activism and education. I strive to create a comfortable environment for every student, and in doing so hope to encourage others to live openly. Diversity breeds creativity; tense, homogenous professional environments neuter many LGBTQ+ employees’ opportunities for success. The LGBTQ+ community must present a strong face to external challenges. Success is the best answer to discrimination, and defeat comes only when we surrender our true identities for the sake of conformity.

hunt godlink
Posts: 120
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2014 10:39 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby hunt godlink » Sun Mar 06, 2016 7:26 pm

Feel free to pm me for an example of a immigrant/socioeconomic disadvantage DS.

dreamer_13
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Mar 12, 2016 3:19 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby dreamer_13 » Tue May 03, 2016 12:45 am

[DELETED]

20171lhopeful
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Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2016 5:12 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby 20171lhopeful » Mon May 30, 2016 11:10 am

I'm having a difficult time writing my DS, and I think it's because my PS focuses on elements that are normally in a DS. As I understand it, the DS is supposed to discuss how my background and experiences will contribute to dynamic of the law school. In my PS, I write about teaching abroad in my parent's home country, and the difficulties I encountered. It describes my determination, perseverance and why I want to go to law school. My interest in public interest/human rights directly stems from my experience abroad and growing up as a first generation American. Now I don't know what to discuss in my DS. I'm a first generation american black female from a disadvantaged socio-economic background, but I don't know how to write about that without sounding whiny and repetitive.

Has anyone else had similar difficulties with the DS? Should I still write a DS even if my PS has a "diversity" aspect to it? And how does one avoid seem cliche and avoid writing an "adversity" statement as opposed to a diversity statement? Are there any resources that people have used and found helpful?

Thanks in advance!

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brinicolec
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby brinicolec » Thu Aug 11, 2016 12:14 am

H E L P.

Is anyone willing to read what I have so far for my DS/help me figure out how to conclude it? I'm normally a strong reader but I. AM. STUCK. ON MY DS AND MY PS.

If so, please PM me!

Fair warning: I'm pretty sure it's kind of choppy right now.

EddieMorgenstern
Posts: 1
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby EddieMorgenstern » Fri Aug 26, 2016 5:16 am

Mod edit: spam

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stratton_oakmont
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2016 8:15 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby stratton_oakmont » Sat Sep 10, 2016 9:39 pm

Can I PM someone my lgbt statement to review?

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dasani13
Posts: 1055
Joined: Fri May 27, 2011 3:21 pm

Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby dasani13 » Sat Sep 10, 2016 10:12 pm

stratton_oakmont wrote:Can I PM someone my lgbt statement to review?


Feel free!

EinassA
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Re: Diversity Statement Samples

Postby EinassA » Mon Sep 26, 2016 12:56 pm

Can I PM someone my diversity statement for feedback? No pressure!! :)




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