RE: African-American or the son of African Immigrants URM???

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
Blackguy123
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 6:10 pm

RE: African-American or the son of African Immigrants URM???

Postby Blackguy123 » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:04 am

Hey guys, I was wondering, what do you think would look more appealing to an admissions committee, an african-american student whose ancestors were slaves (i.e. historically dis-advantaged) or the son of African Immigrants who came to the U.S. in the 1980s? To be specific, from Somalia. Is there much of a difference between the two?

User avatar
ManoftheHour
Posts: 3402
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:03 pm

Re: RE: African-American or the son of African Immigrants URM???

Postby ManoftheHour » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:08 am

I personally believe there should be a huge difference between the two, but from what I've read, no. Black is black. You'd probably get the same boost.

User avatar
dowu
Posts: 8334
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 9:47 pm

Re: RE: African-American or the son of African Immigrants URM???

Postby dowu » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:10 am

It depends. The story of overcoming adversity would be better for a personal statement. The "boost," however, will be the same.

lmr
Posts: 252
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 7:22 am

Re: RE: African-American or the son of African Immigrants URM???

Postby lmr » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:36 am

Blackguy123 wrote:Hey guys, I was wondering, what do you think would look more appealing to an admissions committee, an african-american student whose ancestors were slaves (i.e. historically dis-advantaged) or the son of African Immigrants who came to the U.S. in the 1980s? To be specific, from Somalia. Is there much of a difference between the two?


yeah there's a difference. The American's ancestors were forcibly migrated to this country as slaves and had to endure institutionalized racism for centuries (and still continue to do so). Somalian immigrants came here voluntarily, don't share the same culture experience and systemic racism faced by black americans. Affirmative action is meant to rectify the impact of historical govt racism. The somalian student could have an interesting backstory or something that can show hardship and adversity/what led them to immigrate from their country that would equally be appealing to adcoms. There are so few black students in law school that adcom would prob be receptive to either-I don't see how either will hurt you.

Blackguy123
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 6:10 pm

Re: RE: African-American or the son of African Immigrants URM???

Postby Blackguy123 » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:42 am

Forgot to add also, I'm a muslim too. Should that be mentioned in a diversity statement too, or is religious affiliation more of a "choice" in their eyes?

lmr
Posts: 252
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 7:22 am

Re: RE: African-American or the son of African Immigrants URM???

Postby lmr » Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:49 am

Blackguy123 wrote:Forgot to add also, I'm a muslim too. Should that be mentioned in a diversity statement too, or is religious affiliation more of a "choice" in their eyes?


No mention it, they love that stuff. btw it wasn't really a choice if you were born into it and Islam is religious and cultural, so yeah you should def mention it. how much you mention it depends on how much of an impact it's had on your life/added to adversity etc.




Return to “Under Represented Law Student Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests