URM School Options

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
User avatar
taboo
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:20 am

URM School Options

Postby taboo » Tue Dec 27, 2011 7:59 pm

Hello All

I am currently a junior and I'll be taking the LSAT in June. My current GPA is a 3.44..at the end of the summer I should have that raised to at least a 3.5. I've taken 3 practice LSATs and my highest score was a 156. I would like to get at least a 165 on the actual LSAT. I'm a gay black male, first generation college student, and I would be the first in my family to attend law school or any graduate/professional school for that matter. I am currently a tour guide for my school, the records and accounts chairperson for a governing organization on campus, a member of Alpha Phi Omega National Service Fraternity, and a member of AmeriCorps. What are my chances of getting into the following schools? What are the minimum estimated GPAs and LSATs needed for an URM?

Columbia
U Chicago
NYU
UPenn
UVA
Cornell
Georgetown
WUSTL
George Washington
Boston U
Boston College
UIUC
Howard
Fordham
U Georgia
Duke

Also, I've been in foster care, my mother was a drug addict and my father is a dead beat. I've overcome these adversity with the help of my aunt and I'll talk about this in my personal statement. Is this a good idea? I don't want my PS to sound sad, I'd rather it be inspiring and show how I've overcome these hardships. Should I write a DS? All help would be greatly appreciated as I'm doing all this research on my own and have no help.

Thanks!!

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NomNom
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2011 1:33 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby NomNom » Tue Dec 27, 2011 9:22 pm

First of all, you dont get a different gpa/lsat requirement for being a URM really. It can be a factor, but you are in the same applicant pool.

Discussing how you overcame those obstacles in your PS is wise and a good idea.

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clarion
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 5:53 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby clarion » Fri Dec 30, 2011 5:49 pm

Okay... I don't really know what Nom means by there being the same requirements for URMs as for non-URMs, but I'm just going to assume I'm misunderstanding what he/she means. Although the GPA boost that URMs get tend to be... essentially nonexistent :\, we absolutely get LSAT boosts. And as an AA male, that boost can be as large as 7 to 8 points for some schools.

In any case, absolutely write a diversity statement and a separate, compelling personal statement. I also agree with not wanting it to sound too "woe is me", but since you know that's not the goal, it should be easy enough to accomplish, right? :P As such, make sure that your statement perhaps MENTIONS what you've had to overcome (maybe just an opening anecdote or couple paragraphs), but focuses primarily on how it has made you into the person that you are today. Also, if you're concerned with not sounding too piteous, perhaps have the focus of the diversity statement be what you've overcome, and the personal statement be something else that makes you unique as an applicant that is essentially unrelated to the problems you've faced. Maybe your PS could just be about your experience with the programs you're involved with in school? Mine was just about the similarities between practicing law and being a musician. Whatever suits you.

One of the best quotes I ever stumbled upon while researching stuff about LS apps, was someone (I believe a Dean of admissions at a school) said the applications they enjoy most are those wherein the various parts work together to create a full picture. Use that as your guide. Don't be redundant, but don't focus too heavily on just one dimension of yourself.

Anyways, the reason I wanted to stress all this, is because without an actual score, it's really hard to share much of anything BEYOND that. For URMs, our cycles tend to be extremely unpredictable. So even though I have a 164 LSAT score, my cycle may not reflect on what yours might be with a 165. At the same time, I'd suggest looking through lawschoolnumbers.com to see what others with your numbers do. Perhaps search for 165/3.5 down to 158/3.3 just to get a spectrum and see how things might vary (and believe me, they do vary). But also know that the strength or weakness of your PS and DS could make all the difference.

Best of luck to you, and destroy that LSAT in June! :D

User avatar
moneybagsphd
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2011 11:07 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby moneybagsphd » Fri Dec 30, 2011 5:50 pm

clarion wrote:Okay... I don't really know what Nom means by there being the same requirements for URMs as for non-URMs, but I'm just going to assume I'm misunderstanding what he/she means. Although the GPA boost that URMs get tend to be... essentially nonexistent :\, we absolutely get LSAT boosts. And as an AA male, that boost can be as large as 7 to 8 points for some schools.

Yes, better to be a URM reverse splitter.

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taboo
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:20 am

Re: URM School Options

Postby taboo » Fri Dec 30, 2011 6:15 pm

clarion wrote:Okay... I don't really know what Nom means by there being the same requirements for URMs as for non-URMs, but I'm just going to assume I'm misunderstanding what he/she means. Although the GPA boost that URMs get tend to be... essentially nonexistent :\, we absolutely get LSAT boosts. And as an AA male, that boost can be as large as 7 to 8 points for some schools.

In any case, absolutely write a diversity statement and a separate, compelling personal statement. I also agree with not wanting it to sound too "woe is me", but since you know that's not the goal, it should be easy enough to accomplish, right? :P As such, make sure that your statement perhaps MENTIONS what you've had to overcome (maybe just an opening anecdote or couple paragraphs), but focuses primarily on how it has made you into the person that you are today. Also, if you're concerned with not sounding too piteous, perhaps have the focus of the diversity statement be what you've overcome, and the personal statement be something else that makes you unique as an applicant that is essentially unrelated to the problems you've faced. Maybe your PS could just be about your experience with the programs you're involved with in school? Mine was just about the similarities between practicing law and being a musician. Whatever suits you.

One of the best quotes I ever stumbled upon while researching stuff about LS apps, was someone (I believe a Dean of admissions at a school) said the applications they enjoy most are those wherein the various parts work together to create a full picture. Use that as your guide. Don't be redundant, but don't focus too heavily on just one dimension of yourself.

Anyways, the reason I wanted to stress all this, is because without an actual score, it's really hard to share much of anything BEYOND that. For URMs, our cycles tend to be extremely unpredictable. So even though I have a 164 LSAT score, my cycle may not reflect on what yours might be with a 165. At the same time, I'd suggest looking through lawschoolnumbers.com to see what others with your numbers do. Perhaps search for 165/3.5 down to 158/3.3 just to get a spectrum and see how things might vary (and believe me, they do vary). But also know that the strength or weakness of your PS and DS could make all the difference.

Best of luck to you, and destroy that LSAT in June! :D


Thanks! This is greatly appreciated. I will probably make my DS about what I've overcome and my PS about being apart of AmeriCorps and how helping others helped me help myself.

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JustE
Posts: 1330
Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:49 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby JustE » Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:42 pm

taboo wrote:
clarion wrote:Okay... I don't really know what Nom means by there being the same requirements for URMs as for non-URMs, but I'm just going to assume I'm misunderstanding what he/she means. Although the GPA boost that URMs get tend to be... essentially nonexistent :\, we absolutely get LSAT boosts. And as an AA male, that boost can be as large as 7 to 8 points for some schools.

In any case, absolutely write a diversity statement and a separate, compelling personal statement. I also agree with not wanting it to sound too "woe is me", but since you know that's not the goal, it should be easy enough to accomplish, right? :P As such, make sure that your statement perhaps MENTIONS what you've had to overcome (maybe just an opening anecdote or couple paragraphs), but focuses primarily on how it has made you into the person that you are today. Also, if you're concerned with not sounding too piteous, perhaps have the focus of the diversity statement be what you've overcome, and the personal statement be something else that makes you unique as an applicant that is essentially unrelated to the problems you've faced. Maybe your PS could just be about your experience with the programs you're involved with in school? Mine was just about the similarities between practicing law and being a musician. Whatever suits you.

One of the best quotes I ever stumbled upon while researching stuff about LS apps, was someone (I believe a Dean of admissions at a school) said the applications they enjoy most are those wherein the various parts work together to create a full picture. Use that as your guide. Don't be redundant, but don't focus too heavily on just one dimension of yourself.

Anyways, the reason I wanted to stress all this, is because without an actual score, it's really hard to share much of anything BEYOND that. For URMs, our cycles tend to be extremely unpredictable. So even though I have a 164 LSAT score, my cycle may not reflect on what yours might be with a 165. At the same time, I'd suggest looking through lawschoolnumbers.com to see what others with your numbers do. Perhaps search for 165/3.5 down to 158/3.3 just to get a spectrum and see how things might vary (and believe me, they do vary). But also know that the strength or weakness of your PS and DS could make all the difference.

Best of luck to you, and destroy that LSAT in June! :D


Thanks! This is greatly appreciated. I will probably make my DS about what I've overcome and my PS about being apart of AmeriCorps and how helping others helped me help myself.


AA Male here, WE, 3.21 (3.31), 153/162/166 (my original diagnostic was in the 140s)

I'm currently in at Michigan and Northwestern... still waiting to hear back from the rest of the T-14... applied around turkey day, but no bad news yet...

Didn't read a good portion of this, but I want you to know you are aiming too low. Plenty of people have increased their LSAT score 20 points or more. If you're taking this in June, there's no excuse for you to not hit 170+ on the real thing. I would recommend focusing on question types and not taking PTs until you get more comfortable with each section. You should not miss a single question on LGs (at most two) and you should see considerable improvement on RC and LR.

My biggest issue was setting low expectations for myself. As another black male, I realize our peers tend to glorify anything over 160. Hell, I even realize 165 would put you around the 99th percentile for black males. The problem is, that while that's great, you're capable of hitting the low to high 170s with the time you have. Do not set your aim too low. When I aimed for a 160, I was in the 150s. When I aimed for a 165, I hit a 162. When I finally tried for a 170, I hit a 166 on the real thing. It's all about will power and expectations. I hit the 170s a few times and with another month or so I'm certain I would have hit it on the real thing.

I guess what I'm trying to say is aim for a 180. Try to master the test. As with anything else, it can be done with time.

If you need advice on improving, feel free to PM me. You will have a 3.5. Bust your ass on LSAT prep and enjoy Harvard. With your GPA and life story, anything less than HYS or a full ride is a problem. Test in June, blanket the T-14 in Sept., and enjoy the ride. It's T-14 or bust for you, my friend.

Best of luck!

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JamMasterJ
Posts: 6688
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 7:17 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby JamMasterJ » Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:56 pm

clarion wrote:Okay... I don't really know what Nom means by there being the same requirements for URMs as for non-URMs, but I'm just going to assume I'm misunderstanding what he/she means. Although the GPA boost that URMs get tend to be... essentially nonexistent :\, we absolutely get LSAT boosts. And as an AA male, that boost can be as large as 7 to 8 points for some schools.

In any case, absolutely write a diversity statement and a separate, compelling personal statement. I also agree with not wanting it to sound too "woe is me", but since you know that's not the goal, it should be easy enough to accomplish, right? :P As such, make sure that your statement perhaps MENTIONS what you've had to overcome (maybe just an opening anecdote or couple paragraphs), but focuses primarily on how it has made you into the person that you are today. Also, if you're concerned with not sounding too piteous, perhaps have the focus of the diversity statement be what you've overcome, and the personal statement be something else that makes you unique as an applicant that is essentially unrelated to the problems you've faced. Maybe your PS could just be about your experience with the programs you're involved with in school? Mine was just about the similarities between practicing law and being a musician. Whatever suits you.

One of the best quotes I ever stumbled upon while researching stuff about LS apps, was someone (I believe a Dean of admissions at a school) said the applications they enjoy most are those wherein the various parts work together to create a full picture. Use that as your guide. Don't be redundant, but don't focus too heavily on just one dimension of yourself.

Anyways, the reason I wanted to stress all this, is because without an actual score, it's really hard to share much of anything BEYOND that. For URMs, our cycles tend to be extremely unpredictable. So even though I have a 164 LSAT score, my cycle may not reflect on what yours might be with a 165. At the same time, I'd suggest looking through lawschoolnumbers.com to see what others with your numbers do. Perhaps search for 165/3.5 down to 158/3.3 just to get a spectrum and see how things might vary (and believe me, they do vary). But also know that the strength or weakness of your PS and DS could make all the difference.

Best of luck to you, and destroy that LSAT in June! :D

more like 10 points for AA male and NA. OP, we can't do anything without real-ish numbers, but if you can hit 3.5/165, you are basically in at CCN and down

JDcand
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 5:43 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby JDcand » Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:58 pm

I think your chances will also depend on undergrad major difficulty, but I think you're in the ball park with that GPA. I found that the scores I received on practice tests matched the scores I got on the actual LSAT (took it twice). you may be a gamer though and can pull off a 3-4pt boost on test day. A 156 to 165 jump is unlikely without additional training in my opinion. You also have to consider you've only taken 3 practice tests. I recommend more than 10 practice tests.

I have never been a great test taker, but I feel taking a test prep course such as Princeton Review or Kaplan can maximize your potential. I found there's stuff a teacher can explain in words that you just can't get out of a book. If money's an issue, check out large law firms who will pay for you to take a prep course. You can even take prep course in FEB in preparation for JUN test. You'd be a prime candidate for large law firms offering, say, $1-$2K for that purpose. One example is Sidley Austin.

With a 156 I think you'd be competitive for T20-T40 and likely to get in T40 and below--assuming good personal statement, resume, and letters of rec.

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taboo
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:20 am

Re: URM School Options

Postby taboo » Sat Dec 31, 2011 3:32 pm

JustE wrote: AA Male here, WE, 3.21 (3.31), 153/162/166 (my original diagnostic was in the 140s)

I'm currently in at Michigan and Northwestern... still waiting to hear back from the rest of the T-14... applied around turkey day, but no bad news yet...

Didn't read a good portion of this, but I want you to know you are aiming too low. Plenty of people have increased their LSAT score 20 points or more. If you're taking this in June, there's no excuse for you to not hit 170+ on the real thing. I would recommend focusing on question types and not taking PTs until you get more comfortable with each section. You should not miss a single question on LGs (at most two) and you should see considerable improvement on RC and LR.

My biggest issue was setting low expectations for myself. As another black male, I realize our peers tend to glorify anything over 160. Hell, I even realize 165 would put you around the 99th percentile for black males. The problem is, that while that's great, you're capable of hitting the low to high 170s with the time you have. Do not set your aim too low. When I aimed for a 160, I was in the 150s. When I aimed for a 165, I hit a 162. When I finally tried for a 170, I hit a 166 on the real thing. It's all about will power and expectations. I hit the 170s a few times and with another month or so I'm certain I would have hit it on the real thing.

I guess what I'm trying to say is aim for a 180. Try to master the test. As with anything else, it can be done with time.

If you need advice on improving, feel free to PM me. You will have a 3.5. Bust your ass on LSAT prep and enjoy Harvard. With your GPA and life story, anything less than HYS or a full ride is a problem. Test in June, blanket the T-14 in Sept., and enjoy the ride. It's T-14 or bust for you, my friend.

Best of luck!


Thanks! I understand what you're saying about aiming too low, so I'll be shooting for the 170s and even a 180. Starting in February I'm actually going to follow Pithypike's guide to try and improve in my score. I'll let you know how I do. I'll probably also begin working on my PS and maybe DS just because I know I'll need to revise it alot so I'll let you read them if you don't mind. Thanks for the help..it's greatly appreciated!!

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taboo
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:20 am

Re: URM School Options

Postby taboo » Sat Dec 31, 2011 3:35 pm

JamMasterJ wrote:more like 10 points for AA male and NA. OP, we can't do anything without real-ish numbers, but if you can hit 3.5/165, you are basically in at CCN and down


This is good because CCN are my top choices along with Georgetown. Yale I'm not interested in. Harvard and Stanford will just be reaches..i'll apply anyways however.

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taboo
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:20 am

Re: URM School Options

Postby taboo » Sat Dec 31, 2011 3:39 pm

JDcand wrote:I think your chances will also depend on undergrad major difficulty, but I think you're in the ball park with that GPA. I found that the scores I received on practice tests matched the scores I got on the actual LSAT (took it twice). you may be a gamer though and can pull off a 3-4pt boost on test day. A 156 to 165 jump is unlikely without additional training in my opinion. You also have to consider you've only taken 3 practice tests. I recommend more than 10 practice tests.

I have never been a great test taker, but I feel taking a test prep course such as Princeton Review or Kaplan can maximize your potential. I found there's stuff a teacher can explain in words that you just can't get out of a book. If money's an issue, check out large law firms who will pay for you to take a prep course. You can even take prep course in FEB in preparation for JUN test. You'd be a prime candidate for large law firms offering, say, $1-$2K for that purpose. One example is Sidley Austin.

With a 156 I think you'd be competitive for T20-T40 and likely to get in T40 and below--assuming good personal statement, resume, and letters of rec.


My major is Communications Media with a minor in Business. I'll be following pithypike's guide so I'll be taking more than 10 practice tests. My initial diagnostic was actually a 143..after a month of studying only the logic games and just reading more often (regular books..nothing LSAT or Law related) I then scored a 156 so hopefully I can get in the 170s.

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JustE
Posts: 1330
Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:49 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby JustE » Sat Dec 31, 2011 3:42 pm

taboo wrote:
JDcand wrote:I think your chances will also depend on undergrad major difficulty, but I think you're in the ball park with that GPA. I found that the scores I received on practice tests matched the scores I got on the actual LSAT (took it twice). you may be a gamer though and can pull off a 3-4pt boost on test day. A 156 to 165 jump is unlikely without additional training in my opinion. You also have to consider you've only taken 3 practice tests. I recommend more than 10 practice tests.

I have never been a great test taker, but I feel taking a test prep course such as Princeton Review or Kaplan can maximize your potential. I found there's stuff a teacher can explain in words that you just can't get out of a book. If money's an issue, check out large law firms who will pay for you to take a prep course. You can even take prep course in FEB in preparation for JUN test. You'd be a prime candidate for large law firms offering, say, $1-$2K for that purpose. One example is Sidley Austin.

With a 156 I think you'd be competitive for T20-T40 and likely to get in T40 and below--assuming good personal statement, resume, and letters of rec.


My major is Communications Media with a minor in Business. I'll be following pithypike's guide so I'll be taking more than 10 practice tests. My initial diagnostic was actually a 143..after a month of studying only the logic games and just reading more often (regular books..nothing LSAT or Law related) I then scored a 156 so hopefully I can get in the 170s.


You can! LSAT courses work for some people, but they didn't really do much for me. Courses just give you the structure. You'll still need to put in the hours afterwards.

I would recommend against the course. If you follow Pithypike's guide, you'll be fine. After that, Jamz has a new guide that might help as well. Happy New Year!

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moneybagsphd
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2011 11:07 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby moneybagsphd » Sat Dec 31, 2011 4:42 pm

JustE wrote:
taboo wrote:
clarion wrote:Okay... I don't really know what Nom means by there being the same requirements for URMs as for non-URMs, but I'm just going to assume I'm misunderstanding what he/she means. Although the GPA boost that URMs get tend to be... essentially nonexistent :\, we absolutely get LSAT boosts. And as an AA male, that boost can be as large as 7 to 8 points for some schools.

In any case, absolutely write a diversity statement and a separate, compelling personal statement. I also agree with not wanting it to sound too "woe is me", but since you know that's not the goal, it should be easy enough to accomplish, right? :P As such, make sure that your statement perhaps MENTIONS what you've had to overcome (maybe just an opening anecdote or couple paragraphs), but focuses primarily on how it has made you into the person that you are today. Also, if you're concerned with not sounding too piteous, perhaps have the focus of the diversity statement be what you've overcome, and the personal statement be something else that makes you unique as an applicant that is essentially unrelated to the problems you've faced. Maybe your PS could just be about your experience with the programs you're involved with in school? Mine was just about the similarities between practicing law and being a musician. Whatever suits you.

One of the best quotes I ever stumbled upon while researching stuff about LS apps, was someone (I believe a Dean of admissions at a school) said the applications they enjoy most are those wherein the various parts work together to create a full picture. Use that as your guide. Don't be redundant, but don't focus too heavily on just one dimension of yourself.

Anyways, the reason I wanted to stress all this, is because without an actual score, it's really hard to share much of anything BEYOND that. For URMs, our cycles tend to be extremely unpredictable. So even though I have a 164 LSAT score, my cycle may not reflect on what yours might be with a 165. At the same time, I'd suggest looking through lawschoolnumbers.com to see what others with your numbers do. Perhaps search for 165/3.5 down to 158/3.3 just to get a spectrum and see how things might vary (and believe me, they do vary). But also know that the strength or weakness of your PS and DS could make all the difference.

Best of luck to you, and destroy that LSAT in June! :D


Thanks! This is greatly appreciated. I will probably make my DS about what I've overcome and my PS about being apart of AmeriCorps and how helping others helped me help myself.


AA Male here, WE, 3.21 (3.31), 153/162/166 (my original diagnostic was in the 140s)

I'm currently in at Michigan and Northwestern... still waiting to hear back from the rest of the T-14... applied around turkey day, but no bad news yet...

Didn't read a good portion of this, but I want you to know you are aiming too low. Plenty of people have increased their LSAT score 20 points or more. If you're taking this in June, there's no excuse for you to not hit 170+ on the real thing. I would recommend focusing on question types and not taking PTs until you get more comfortable with each section. You should not miss a single question on LGs (at most two) and you should see considerable improvement on RC and LR.

My biggest issue was setting low expectations for myself. As another black male, I realize our peers tend to glorify anything over 160. Hell, I even realize 165 would put you around the 99th percentile for black males. The problem is, that while that's great, you're capable of hitting the low to high 170s with the time you have. Do not set your aim too low. When I aimed for a 160, I was in the 150s. When I aimed for a 165, I hit a 162. When I finally tried for a 170, I hit a 166 on the real thing. It's all about will power and expectations. I hit the 170s a few times and with another month or so I'm certain I would have hit it on the real thing.

I guess what I'm trying to say is aim for a 180. Try to master the test. As with anything else, it can be done with time.

If you need advice on improving, feel free to PM me. You will have a 3.5. Bust your ass on LSAT prep and enjoy Harvard. With your GPA and life story, anything less than HYS or a full ride is a problem. Test in June, blanket the T-14 in Sept., and enjoy the ride. It's T-14 or bust for you, my friend.

Best of luck!

Minor digression: If you applied around Thanksgiving, when did you get offers? Was it mid or late December? Not URM, but just wondering for my own cycle. Congrats on two T14 acceptances so far!

Definitely set your expectations high on the LSAT. I did well enough on the LSAT that I can't really complain about my score. But I only took five pts before the real thing, and definitely underperformed to my potential. Alas, I started using TLS only after I took the LSAT (mostly to kvetch about waiting for my score). There are plenty of resources here to help you prep for the LSAT.
http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=120471
http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=41657

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JustE
Posts: 1330
Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:49 pm

Re: URM School Options

Postby JustE » Sat Dec 31, 2011 4:44 pm

moneybagsphd wrote:
JustE wrote:
taboo wrote:
clarion wrote:Okay... I don't really know what Nom means by there being the same requirements for URMs as for non-URMs, but I'm just going to assume I'm misunderstanding what he/she means. Although the GPA boost that URMs get tend to be... essentially nonexistent :\, we absolutely get LSAT boosts. And as an AA male, that boost can be as large as 7 to 8 points for some schools.

In any case, absolutely write a diversity statement and a separate, compelling personal statement. I also agree with not wanting it to sound too "woe is me", but since you know that's not the goal, it should be easy enough to accomplish, right? :P As such, make sure that your statement perhaps MENTIONS what you've had to overcome (maybe just an opening anecdote or couple paragraphs), but focuses primarily on how it has made you into the person that you are today. Also, if you're concerned with not sounding too piteous, perhaps have the focus of the diversity statement be what you've overcome, and the personal statement be something else that makes you unique as an applicant that is essentially unrelated to the problems you've faced. Maybe your PS could just be about your experience with the programs you're involved with in school? Mine was just about the similarities between practicing law and being a musician. Whatever suits you.

One of the best quotes I ever stumbled upon while researching stuff about LS apps, was someone (I believe a Dean of admissions at a school) said the applications they enjoy most are those wherein the various parts work together to create a full picture. Use that as your guide. Don't be redundant, but don't focus too heavily on just one dimension of yourself.

Anyways, the reason I wanted to stress all this, is because without an actual score, it's really hard to share much of anything BEYOND that. For URMs, our cycles tend to be extremely unpredictable. So even though I have a 164 LSAT score, my cycle may not reflect on what yours might be with a 165. At the same time, I'd suggest looking through lawschoolnumbers.com to see what others with your numbers do. Perhaps search for 165/3.5 down to 158/3.3 just to get a spectrum and see how things might vary (and believe me, they do vary). But also know that the strength or weakness of your PS and DS could make all the difference.

Best of luck to you, and destroy that LSAT in June! :D


Thanks! This is greatly appreciated. I will probably make my DS about what I've overcome and my PS about being apart of AmeriCorps and how helping others helped me help myself.


AA Male here, WE, 3.21 (3.31), 153/162/166 (my original diagnostic was in the 140s)

I'm currently in at Michigan and Northwestern... still waiting to hear back from the rest of the T-14... applied around turkey day, but no bad news yet...

Didn't read a good portion of this, but I want you to know you are aiming too low. Plenty of people have increased their LSAT score 20 points or more. If you're taking this in June, there's no excuse for you to not hit 170+ on the real thing. I would recommend focusing on question types and not taking PTs until you get more comfortable with each section. You should not miss a single question on LGs (at most two) and you should see considerable improvement on RC and LR.

My biggest issue was setting low expectations for myself. As another black male, I realize our peers tend to glorify anything over 160. Hell, I even realize 165 would put you around the 99th percentile for black males. The problem is, that while that's great, you're capable of hitting the low to high 170s with the time you have. Do not set your aim too low. When I aimed for a 160, I was in the 150s. When I aimed for a 165, I hit a 162. When I finally tried for a 170, I hit a 166 on the real thing. It's all about will power and expectations. I hit the 170s a few times and with another month or so I'm certain I would have hit it on the real thing.

I guess what I'm trying to say is aim for a 180. Try to master the test. As with anything else, it can be done with time.

If you need advice on improving, feel free to PM me. You will have a 3.5. Bust your ass on LSAT prep and enjoy Harvard. With your GPA and life story, anything less than HYS or a full ride is a problem. Test in June, blanket the T-14 in Sept., and enjoy the ride. It's T-14 or bust for you, my friend.

Best of luck!

Minor digression: If you applied around Thanksgiving, when did you get offers? Was it mid or late December? Not URM, but just wondering for my own cycle. Congrats on two T14 acceptances so far!

Definitely set your expectations high on the LSAT. I did well enough on the LSAT that I can't really complain about my score. But I only took five pts before the real thing, and definitely underperformed to my potential. Alas, I started using TLS only after I took the LSAT (mostly to kvetch about waiting for my score). There are plenty of resources here to help you prep for the LSAT.
http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=120471
http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=41657


I heard from both this week. One on Tuesday, the other Thursday. Expecting more in Jan.




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