First Generation Chinese Immigrant

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
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MachineLemon
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First Generation Chinese Immigrant

Postby MachineLemon » Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:07 am

I have a friend applying to law school as a first generation Chinese immigrant. Lower numbers. Any URM/diversity bump for him? I searched the forums, but couldn't find much on this.

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20130312
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Re: First Generation Chinese Immigrant

Postby 20130312 » Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:16 am

Definitely no URM bump. If he writes a good diversity statement, that could help slightly.

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TaipeiMort
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Re: First Generation Chinese Immigrant

Postby TaipeiMort » Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:27 am

No. Like Jewish, Japanese, and Mormon people, Chinese students are over represented.

Those that should have a gripe, but don't, are groups like white southerners, Southeast Asians, Polynesians, and non-indian South Asians, who are underepresented, but aren't recognized as distinct.

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20130312
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Re: First Generation Chinese Immigrant

Postby 20130312 » Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:38 am

TaipeiMort wrote:No. Like Jewish, Japanese, and Mormon people, Chinese students are over represented.

Those that should have a gripe, but don't, are groups like white southerners, Southeast Asians, Polynesians, and non-indian South Asians, who are underepresented, but aren't recognized as distinct.


True that they are over represented, but I think the first generation immigrant part is what makes this candidate diverse.

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MachineLemon
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Re: First Generation Chinese Immigrant

Postby MachineLemon » Wed Dec 14, 2011 2:20 pm

Makes sense, thanks. Kind of a separate question, but at what level does Chinese fluency confer an advantage in hiring? I can't imagine needing it at many smaller firms, but would it give him a boost for big law?

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TaipeiMort
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Re: First Generation Chinese Immigrant

Postby TaipeiMort » Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:57 pm

TylerM wrote:Makes sense, thanks. Kind of a separate question, but at what level does Chinese fluency confer an advantage in hiring? I can't imagine needing it at many smaller firms, but would it give him a boost for big law?


Finally, something where I can actually contribute to TLS, and am not just making up crap.

I found that firms are split into four in terms of how they use this (of the 70+ firms I interviewed with).

Firms with no real China plan, but could in the future (about 35%): Wow, that's neat, nice soft-- small, small boost. They don't care about your fluency and you could probably get by being an ABC (American Born Chinese) who can speak marginally but can't read or write.

Firms that will never have a China plan (Williams and Connolly) (about 35%): Well, you obviously are interested in practicing law involving Chinese clients, so we really want someone who is actually interested in domestic litigation, not you.

Firms that are really trying to get into China, but haven't matured/ gained market saturation (about 20%): Ability to use the language charismatically is a HUGE boost. They want people who can speak very fluently and sell their brand in China, and also have an understanding of localities and China-related markets. The two types they usually will take are:
1) Native Chinese who get JDs with real world experience (China firm like King and Wood or Junhe, or Goldman or McKinsey),
2) Charismatic Americans who have near-native fluency and have worked in Chinese business (mostly Mormons, but also some dudes with Chinese wives and ABCs whose parents actually forced them to speak at home).

Firms that are in the Chinese market: Basically the Magic Circle London firms, Baker and Mckenzie, Skadden, OMM, etc. These firms want people that can speak fluently, but also can write and read fluenty (ie. being able to read BBC in Chinese, can draft emails, and recognize 3-5k characters). I fall into this category, and found that these firms have been burned a ton by ABCs, military members who learned a bit, and people who have lived in China for 6 months, or those who have studied Chinese in college without living there. You really need to show that you did well on either the OPI or the HSK, or have done something else that demonstrated you actually have command of the language (I worked at a chinese law firm and did well on both of the tests). If you are at this level, jobs are really easy if you know who to talk to and go to a T14 school.

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MachineLemon
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Re: First Generation Chinese Immigrant

Postby MachineLemon » Thu Dec 15, 2011 1:23 am

Great stuff! Thanks for all the info!




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