URMs scoring 160 or above

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
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EbonyEsq
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby EbonyEsq » Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:44 pm

1evilo.aihpos wrote:178
How did I prepare differently as a AA: I aknowledged the fact that soceity perpectuates the stereotype that blacks are not as smart as whites, then I got over it. :wink:


;)

For some, that's half the battle.

1evilo.aihpos wrote:What applies to everyone: Bibles LR X2 with notes, Bible LG once, practice makes perfect REA logic games, went through twice. As many PT as possible. Month before the test one PT five minute break then another 4 sections. (You will have so much endurance you will do a pt after the actual :mrgreen: ) For LR write down why each answer choice is wrong or right for a couple tests.

edit' oh yeah, Vitimain Water and the night before the exam a nice bath and a steak.



How long did you study for?

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1evilo.aihpos
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby 1evilo.aihpos » Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:48 pm

EbonyEsq wrote:
1evilo.aihpos wrote:178
How did I prepare differently as a AA: I aknowledged the fact that soceity perpectuates the stereotype that blacks are not as smart as whites, then I got over it. :wink:


;)

For some, that's half the battle.

1evilo.aihpos wrote:What applies to everyone: Bibles LR X2 with notes, Bible LG once, practice makes perfect REA logic games, went through twice. As many PT as possible. Month before the test one PT five minute break then another 4 sections. (You will have so much endurance you will do a pt after the actual :mrgreen: ) For LR write down why each answer choice is wrong or right for a couple tests.

edit' oh yeah, Vitimain Water and the night before the exam a nice bath and a steak.



How long did you study for?


umm, maybe 6 months 2 of those seriously. I studied for like 3 months then stopped for half a year then studied another three. I think this allowed me to create two layers, if that makes sense.

rundoxierun
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby rundoxierun » Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:48 pm

EbonyEsq wrote:
tkgrrett wrote:One key thing about the LSAT is that b/c of the massive number of questions released you can accomplish speed through simple pattern recognition. Basically, within a given type of question (must be true, flaw in reasoning, games, etc.) the time limitations and the rigidity of the need for absolutely credited choices means majority of the questions must be of a certain limited length and structure. Simply organizing specific types of questions and drilling through them should help you recognize many of the patterns. Make note of the patterns/structures as you proceed until recognizing them becomes second nature. Like another poster said, you should start LG untimed and while untimed make as many inferences as possible on your main diagram. Again, because of the sheer number of games you can use this to make note of types of inferences that commonly show up (i.e. the games that say things like "no car can be next to a bus" usually have very common inferences). Making note of these and recognizing them allows you to speed up game setups and easily move through subsequent questions.

Doing this allows you to immediately know the key things about the different type of questions. For instance, you will know what the common flaws are for flaw in reasoning questions. You can blast through well more than half of the LR/LG questions with the help of pattern recognition. This allows you more time for the questions that come up with new, or rarely used structures. I really believe that this is key in consistently scoring over 170.


Thanks for this. As far as organizing by question or game type, did you use Cambridge LSAT for this or did you organize on your own?


Dont know what Cambridge LSAT is. For games I started with a list like this http://lsatblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/lo ... types.html and worked towards making my own categories from there. For LR I pretty much organized myself.

Another note.. dont over-technique the lsat. Learn how your own mind works. For me, the hardest section to really master was RC. I was really inconsistent, having huge jumps from -0 on one test to maybe -8 on the next. It was really frustrating for me b/c I had scored at or near the top 5-8% on the ACT/SAT and couldnt understand why it would be a problem for me to kill the RC. Eventually, I realized the techniques I used to try to assist in RC (highlighting, circling) were actually harming my focus. I was focusing more on what I had underlined than the overall message of the passage or paragraph. Plus, what I was underlining rarely showed up in the questions so I was having to go back to the passage anyway. I found it much more effective for me to just quickly read through the passage as a whole and proceed to the questions. I found that I was able to quickly answer the main point questions and some of the reasoning questions and I could easily go back to the passage when the questions referred to specific lines or paragraphs.

Takeaway: start with some recommended techniques but eventually(within a couple of weeks) start honing your studying on your own way of thinking/learning.
Last edited by rundoxierun on Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ArchRoark
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby ArchRoark » Thu Jan 13, 2011 9:49 pm

1. What was your initial diagnostic score? 159
2. What was your score on test day? 177
3. How long did you study for this exam? 3months-4months
4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam? Tons of preptests, the power score logic game and reasoning bibles, and the Powerscore full length supplemental book. I didn't know about TLS and only signed up to this website after I received my score. I didn't use them, but I have seem some pretty good study guides on here.
5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful? Powerscore full length. The material was useful and my instructor was awesome, but it was rather slow paced for me. I mainly used it as a way to force myself to study for the 4hr class periods. I would work ahead in class, do the days homework, and then started putting a dent in the gi-normous supplemental book they provided. Also, when I would get stuck on a question and I couldn't understand why I had gotten it wrong/right, I would ask my instructor who was always able to make TCR clear.
6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it? Study hard.

Now for the rest of my suggestions:

Take a ton of preptests and actually REVIEW THEM. Understand why the questions you got right are right (especially those that you were indecisive between two options and "guessed" right) and why the questions you got wrong are wrong. Work on nailing down the concepts then just churn out preptests in a test setting that replicates the real environment (i.e. take them in the morning in a timed environment without breaks and with 5 sections). Find out what question type/game/reading comprehension topic gives you the most difficulty and practice those extensively till you see a marked improvement. Fix your diet, sleep routine, and exercise schedule. I cut out all sodas/fast food, made dank fresh squeezed vegetable/fruit juices, ran every day, took a multivitamin, and made an effort to go to bed at a reasonable time for the month leading up the the test. The night before the test, I could not fall asleep. My mind would not shut down. But I woke up after only like 3-4hours of sleep and felt completely refreshed. I meditated for 30m/1hr before the test to put my mind at ease and then went in ready to kick ass. I have never had test anxiety, but I noticed a lot of people freaking out both before the test, during the break, and after. My most unpredictable section was always reading comprehension. On average I would range from -0 to -5. On test day, I aced it. Part of it just luck. I always did better when the passages were on topics I could relate to or enjoyed reading about. That just happened to be the case for me on test day.

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JazzOne
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby JazzOne » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:39 pm

EbonyEsq wrote:
JazzOne wrote:1. What was your initial diagnostic score? I never took a diagnostic test.
2. What was your score on test day? 174
3. How long did you study for this exam? Two years. I was working full-time (overtime as well). I was also taking some graduate courses during that period, so it wasn't intense studying for the entire two years, but I was teaching MCAT and LSAT, so in a sense, I was prepping at work.
4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam? Princeton Review Hyperlearning materials, Princeton Review trainers and instructors, TLS. I also think some of my hobbies contribute to my aptitude for standardized tests. I read a lot of nonfiction in my spare time. I also enjoy playing strategy games like chess and Words with Friends. I was a jazz saxophone player for about 20 years, playing little gigs here and there, so I think that helped me develop poise and deal with test anxiety. I'm sure other competitive activities like sports have similar effects.
5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful? No, I would never pay for a test prep class.
6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it? That's a tough one. Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. I guess my advice would be to focus on your weaknesses. And when you're evaluating your weaknesses, think beyond the LSAT. For instance, someone above mentioned working out. If fitness is a weakness of yours, this is a good time to work on that, especially because fitness can help you concentrate and prepare for the LSAT. If you're overusing cigarettes or alcohol, that can affect your concentration on test day. Eating healthy might be a problem. Also, focus on your weaknesses on the test. Don't be afraid to study games or RC because it's hard. That's what makes it fun. It wouldn't even be worth doing if it was easy.


Thanks for your contribution. As a point of inquiry, I believe I read you decided against going to law school. Please correct me if I'm wrong here but if not, any particular reason as to why?

Also, how is eating healthy a possible problem?

I'm a 2L, so I'm not sure why you thought I decided against law school. Also, I meant that people have a hard time maintaining a healthy diet, not that eating healthy was itself a problem. Rather, people have a problem doing it, myself included.

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EbonyEsq
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby EbonyEsq » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:42 pm

JazzOne wrote:
EbonyEsq wrote:
JazzOne wrote:1. What was your initial diagnostic score? I never took a diagnostic test.
2. What was your score on test day? 174
3. How long did you study for this exam? Two years. I was working full-time (overtime as well). I was also taking some graduate courses during that period, so it wasn't intense studying for the entire two years, but I was teaching MCAT and LSAT, so in a sense, I was prepping at work.
4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam? Princeton Review Hyperlearning materials, Princeton Review trainers and instructors, TLS. I also think some of my hobbies contribute to my aptitude for standardized tests. I read a lot of nonfiction in my spare time. I also enjoy playing strategy games like chess and Words with Friends. I was a jazz saxophone player for about 20 years, playing little gigs here and there, so I think that helped me develop poise and deal with test anxiety. I'm sure other competitive activities like sports have similar effects.
5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful? No, I would never pay for a test prep class.
6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it? That's a tough one. Everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. I guess my advice would be to focus on your weaknesses. And when you're evaluating your weaknesses, think beyond the LSAT. For instance, someone above mentioned working out. If fitness is a weakness of yours, this is a good time to work on that, especially because fitness can help you concentrate and prepare for the LSAT. If you're overusing cigarettes or alcohol, that can affect your concentration on test day. Eating healthy might be a problem. Also, focus on your weaknesses on the test. Don't be afraid to study games or RC because it's hard. That's what makes it fun. It wouldn't even be worth doing if it was easy.


Thanks for your contribution. As a point of inquiry, I believe I read you decided against going to law school. Please correct me if I'm wrong here but if not, any particular reason as to why?

Also, how is eating healthy a possible problem?

I'm a 2L, so I'm not sure why you thought I decided against law school. Also, I meant that people have a hard time maintaining a healthy diet, not that eating healthy was itself a problem. Rather, people have a problem doing it, myself included.


Cool. Thanks for clarifying. Good luck with your 2L summer. :wink:

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EbonyEsq
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby EbonyEsq » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:46 pm

ArchRoark wrote:1. What was your initial diagnostic score? 159
2. What was your score on test day? 177
3. How long did you study for this exam? 3months-4months
4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam? Tons of preptests, the power score logic game and reasoning bibles, and the Powerscore full length supplemental book. I didn't know about TLS and only signed up to this website after I received my score. I didn't use them, but I have seem some pretty good study guides on here.
5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful? Powerscore full length. The material was useful and my instructor was awesome, but it was rather slow paced for me. I mainly used it as a way to force myself to study for the 4hr class periods. I would work ahead in class, do the days homework, and then started putting a dent in the gi-normous supplemental book they provided. Also, when I would get stuck on a question and I couldn't understand why I had gotten it wrong/right, I would ask my instructor who was always able to make TCR clear.
6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it? Study hard.

Now for the rest of my suggestions:

Take a ton of preptests and actually REVIEW THEM. Understand why the questions you got right are right (especially those that you were indecisive between two options and "guessed" right) and why the questions you got wrong are wrong. Work on nailing down the concepts then just churn out preptests in a test setting that replicates the real environment (i.e. take them in the morning in a timed environment without breaks and with 5 sections). Find out what question type/game/reading comprehension topic gives you the most difficulty and practice those extensively till you see a marked improvement. Fix your diet, sleep routine, and exercise schedule. I cut out all sodas/fast food, made dank fresh squeezed vegetable/fruit juices, ran every day, took a multivitamin, and made an effort to go to bed at a reasonable time for the month leading up the the test. The night before the test, I could not fall asleep. My mind would not shut down. But I woke up after only like 3-4hours of sleep and felt completely refreshed. I meditated for 30m/1hr before the test to put my mind at ease and then went in ready to kick ass. I have never had test anxiety, but I noticed a lot of people freaking out both before the test, during the break, and after. My most unpredictable section was always reading comprehension. On average I would range from -0 to -5. On test day, I aced it. Part of it just luck. I always did better when the passages were on topics I could relate to or enjoyed reading about. That just happened to be the case for me on test day.


Congratulations on your excellent score and thanks for contributing ! I'll be honest though, throw in working full time and it can prove difficult in maintaining a fixed diet, sleep routing and exercise schedule.

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JazzOne
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby JazzOne » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:19 am

EbonyEsq wrote:Cool. Thanks for clarifying. Good luck with your 2L summer. :wink:

Thank you very much. I did a midlaw SA last summer, and I have a biglaw gig lined up this summer. I'd be happy to answer any questions about working for a firm as a URM. I never really felt like being URM affected my LSAT prep, but being the only minority at an entire office was definitely an odd experience. Good luck everyone.

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s0ph1e2007
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby s0ph1e2007 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:24 am

helloscriptkitti wrote:
csalguero10 wrote:As an addition to my post here is what I've found was absolutely crucial to maintaining focus and not becoming seriously depressed while studying: WORK OUT. Seriously. Get as much exercise as you possibly can. Whenever my mind would start wandering, I would go outside for a run/swim/lift/whatever and that would immediately make me feel better. Remember your mind isn't at its sharpest if your body feels like crap. Take care of yourself as a whole.


I completely agree. When I first starting studying i completely ditched the gym, thinking that time would be better spent studying instead. This lead to tons of built-up anxiety, headaches and emotional eating (cheeseburgers and cheesecake), which made me feel sluggish. Your mind and body need time to decompress in order to function at peak level. One will not function well without the other.


+1
LSAT in february I wasn't working out, just studying all day long and loosing a bunch of weight from anxiety, then I started running again before the October LSAT and did quite a bit better (less anxiety was probably the culprit here, and part of that had to do with being prepared for the physical effects of stress)

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ArchRoark
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby ArchRoark » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:25 am

EbonyEsq wrote:Congratulations on your excellent score and thanks for contributing ! I'll be honest though, throw in working full time and it can prove difficult in maintaining a fixed diet, sleep routing and exercise schedule.


I was working full time. It wasn't easy, but it is certainly doable.

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s0ph1e2007
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby s0ph1e2007 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:27 am

1evilo.aihpos wrote:178


edit: if you run out of pts then do them again, faster.


+1

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BlakcMajikc
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby BlakcMajikc » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:21 pm

URM - AA female

1. What was your initial diagnostic score? 158
2. What was your score on test day? 161, then 170 retake
3. How long did you study for this exam? 5 wks the first time, Nov 1 - Dec 8th for the retake
4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam?
Princeton Review to get me educated on what the test actually was
Powerscore LG Bible
LSAC's Official Prep Book
I took about 25 PTs

I came into the LSAT not knowing a thing about the exam. I used the basic books: Princeton Review and LSAC's guide just to get acquainted with the type of test. I was told those books were worthless, but it was a great place to start when I had no idea what to do first.


5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful?
Knewton, the online LSAT prep
Gave me a great guideline for studying which I didn't have for the first LSAT. I only enrolled bc of the five pt moneyback guarantee. I did every preptest they offered, every quiz and every hw
.

6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it?
Someone mentioned exam-day jitters that can make your PT scores dive substantially on the real thing (aka the 5 point plunge). I would take account of that.

Here are some other tips:
Learn how to make yourself laugh. Some of the most refreshing moments of the exam occurred when I was able to actually laugh during the arguments section over the absurdity of some of the logic. It sounds nerdy, but I knew anytime I could laugh at the flaws in the presented argument, I actually understood what was in front of me. Because its pretty tough to have a good chuckle at something you don’t understand, a laugh is a good sign.

Allow yourself to imagine, but not wander... One of the biggest challenges of the LSAT is the abstract language. While a lot of advice is given about active reading, the most important active brain function during the three arguments section of the test (aka the most boring) is the use of imagination. Instead of thinking of each question as a block of mundane logic and LSAT jargon, consider most of the three sections of ~25 questions each as individual stories.

When in doubt, just be cocky... Hesitancy during the LSAT usually just wastes time. If you are going to pick choice C over choice D, do it with confidence because you will circle in the answer faster and be able to move on to the next question without a “shoulda, coulda woulda” on the previous question. For the logic games section (where questions can build off of the previous ones), the cockiness is the ability to know that your next answer can help you adjust to the logic game and correct previous mistakes. Use the logic games as a way to tell the test makers “haha, you can’t trick me!” No matter what it is better to be confident than to doubt yourself.

Get into a rhythm with your test taking. Whether it is doodling what you are reading or humming the words to yourself, that rhythm will help you methodically pace yourself through the test. Just make sure you don’t distract your neighbor!

SupraVln180
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby SupraVln180 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 4:23 pm

JazzOne wrote:
EbonyEsq wrote:Cool. Thanks for clarifying. Good luck with your 2L summer. :wink:

Thank you very much. I did a midlaw SA last summer, and I have a biglaw gig lined up this summer. I'd be happy to answer any questions about working for a firm as a URM. I never really felt like being URM affected my LSAT prep, but being the only minority at an entire office was definitely an odd experience. Good luck everyone.


Jazz do you think being a minority helped you line up such a great Summer Associates position or are you above the median? Or could it be a combination of both?

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EbonyEsq
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby EbonyEsq » Fri Jan 14, 2011 4:46 pm

BlakcMajikc wrote:URM - AA female

1. What was your initial diagnostic score? 158
2. What was your score on test day? 161, then 170 retake
3. How long did you study for this exam? 5 wks the first time, Nov 1 - Dec 8th for the retake
4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam?
Princeton Review to get me educated on what the test actually was
Powerscore LG Bible
LSAC's Official Prep Book
I took about 25 PTs

I came into the LSAT not knowing a thing about the exam. I used the basic books: Princeton Review and LSAC's guide just to get acquainted with the type of test. I was told those books were worthless, but it was a great place to start when I had no idea what to do first.


5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful?
Knewton, the online LSAT prep
Gave me a great guideline for studying which I didn't have for the first LSAT. I only enrolled bc of the five pt moneyback guarantee. I did every preptest they offered, every quiz and every hw
.

6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it?
Someone mentioned exam-day jitters that can make your PT scores dive substantially on the real thing (aka the 5 point plunge). I would take account of that.

Here are some other tips:
Learn how to make yourself laugh. Some of the most refreshing moments of the exam occurred when I was able to actually laugh during the arguments section over the absurdity of some of the logic. It sounds nerdy, but I knew anytime I could laugh at the flaws in the presented argument, I actually understood what was in front of me. Because its pretty tough to have a good chuckle at something you don’t understand, a laugh is a good sign.

Allow yourself to imagine, but not wander... One of the biggest challenges of the LSAT is the abstract language. While a lot of advice is given about active reading, the most important active brain function during the three arguments section of the test (aka the most boring) is the use of imagination. Instead of thinking of each question as a block of mundane logic and LSAT jargon, consider most of the three sections of ~25 questions each as individual stories.

When in doubt, just be cocky... Hesitancy during the LSAT usually just wastes time. If you are going to pick choice C over choice D, do it with confidence because you will circle in the answer faster and be able to move on to the next question without a “shoulda, coulda woulda” on the previous question. For the logic games section (where questions can build off of the previous ones), the cockiness is the ability to know that your next answer can help you adjust to the logic game and correct previous mistakes. Use the logic games as a way to tell the test makers “haha, you can’t trick me!” No matter what it is better to be confident than to doubt yourself.

Get into a rhythm with your test taking. Whether it is doodling what you are reading or humming the words to yourself, that rhythm will help you methodically pace yourself through the test. Just make sure you don’t distract your neighbor!


Thanks, girl!

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EbonyEsq
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby EbonyEsq » Fri Jan 14, 2011 5:04 pm

SMA22 wrote:Gaia, I'm going to back you on this one--I just want to say, law school is about diverse groups learning to see eye to eye, not highlighting their differences. I got this far because I worked my butt off, like everybody else who got in the 170s. I want to prep like someone who wants to go to law school, not like a URM.

To anybody taking, regardless of their heritage or socioeconomic status, good luck!


Wanted to respond to this earlier but never got around to it until now.

IMHO, law school has nothing to do with what you're suggesting. Law school, like the legal career to follow, is far from diverse (and I not only speak about diversity along racial lines, but also cultural and social). Of course the admission committees of many law schools will state they are seeking a 'diverse' group of people and flaunt their stats to show how 'diverse' their numbers. But the reality remains that it is still a legal education dominated by Caucasians and until recently, males. IMO, law school is simply there to get you from Point A to B. Nothing more, nothing less. Interestingly enough, like employment rates, law schools exaggerate their 'diversity' figures. It's a completely different reality once you get past those doors.

That said, no one is challenging the efforts you made to get your 170+ nor is one suggesting you had to study differently to get your 170 as a URM. You prepped like a LSAT student and you kicked ass like one who did what they needed to do. Fabulous. But best believe that no matter your LSAT score, the world outside of TLS will first see and judge you on the basis of your skin color/ethnicity and most certainly your gender even if you aced your LSAT, held your own at a top law school and graduated with top honors.

It is what it is. But on the real, this thread's purpose is to simply hear from fellow URMs on how they rocked the exam.

Once again, congratulations on your score, thanks for your contribution and good luck with the remainder of your cycle. :wink:

rockies2
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby rockies2 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:56 pm

If you do not mind sharing:

1. What was your initial diagnostic score? Didn't take one

2. What was your score on test day? 159/170

3. How long did you study for this exam? 2 months before each exam

4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam?
Kaplan/Princeton Review/PTs for the first exam, just PTs for the second

5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful?
no
6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it?
I know this asks for one but I have a few...
1. Prepare for bad testing conditions! I scored 8 points lower than my average PT because I wasn't prepared for the lecture hall's mini desks and excessive noise from inside and outside the testing room. The second time around I only let myself practice under noisy, distracting conditions and ended up doing 2 points better than my average PT (I averaged 168 and ranged 166-173)

2. If nothing else, practice with previous LSATs and give yourself a variety. It's much easier to strengthen your logic when you are working with logically sound problems. Some of the other test prep books were questionable in this regard - IMO. Using a mix of PTs from 10 years back to recent exams will help you recognize your weaknesses so you can build them up. I found the games to be much harder than the reading comprehension in the older PTs and the opposite in the more recent ones.

3. 10 days leading up to the exam, go to sleep, wake up and eat at he exact same time. Take all practice tests around the same time the exam begins. Exercise is essential...I stopped working out before the first exam and I noticed a huge difference in my focus and anxiety.

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bk1
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby bk1 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 7:05 pm

EbonyEsq wrote:
SMA22 wrote:Gaia, I'm going to back you on this one--I just want to say, law school is about diverse groups learning to see eye to eye, not highlighting their differences. I got this far because I worked my butt off, like everybody else who got in the 170s. I want to prep like someone who wants to go to law school, not like a URM.

To anybody taking, regardless of their heritage or socioeconomic status, good luck!


Wanted to respond to this earlier but never got around to it until now.

IMHO, law school has nothing to do with what you're suggesting. Law school, like the legal career to follow, is far from diverse (and I not only speak about diversity along racial lines, but also cultural and social). Of course the admission committees of many law schools will state they are seeking a 'diverse' group of people and flaunt their stats to show how 'diverse' their numbers. But the reality remains that it is still a legal education dominated by Caucasians and until recently, males. IMO, law school is simply there to get you from Point A to B. Nothing more, nothing less. Interestingly enough, like employment rates, law schools exaggerate their 'diversity' figures. It's a completely different reality once you get past those doors.

That said, no one is challenging the efforts you made to get your 170+ nor is one suggesting you had to study differently to get your 170 as a URM. You prepped like a LSAT student and you kicked ass like one who did what they needed to do. Fabulous. But best believe that no matter your LSAT score, the world outside of TLS will first see and judge you on the basis of your skin color/ethnicity and most certainly your gender even if you aced your LSAT, held your own at a top law school and graduated with top honors.

It is what it is. But on the real, this thread's purpose is to simply hear from fellow URMs on how they rocked the exam.

Once again, congratulations on your score, thanks for your contribution and good luck with the remainder of your cycle. :wink:


What do you mean they exaggerate their diversity figures? Isn't it "people of color" and that means anybody who isn't white? What's wrong with that?

What does the fact that law is not diverse have to do with purposely differentiating yourself (race/ethnicity) and excluding people based on something that really shouldn't be affected by that (LSAT prep)?

The thing that bothers me about these types of threads, as well as threads like "January Applicants" or "English Major Applicants" or "12 Toed Applicants" and the like, is that I don't see a purpose in trying to commiserate with only a subset of people based on some arbitrary distinction. It reeks of a pointless need to feel special.

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20121109
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby 20121109 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 7:27 pm

*Must remember my mod responsibilities and not troll and/or instigate...*

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EbonyEsq
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby EbonyEsq » Fri Jan 14, 2011 8:07 pm

bk1 wrote:What do you mean they exaggerate their diversity figures? Isn't it "people of color" and that means anybody who isn't white? What's wrong with that?


LOL.

Why don't you start with this:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/07/education/07law.html

and this:

http://blogs.law.columbia.edu/salt/

and for some additional icing on the cake:

http://weblaw.usc.edu/why/students/orgs ... ersity.pdf

Case in point: Asians are generally not considered nor treated as a URM/person of color for admission purposes but for law school data it's another story. Once admitted, they are now considered "minorities" that add to a school's "diversity" which in turn helps boost the school's USNWR's diversity index...oh, you know, another one of those rankings that schools really really care about...

My point? Rankings are everything and many will exaggerate their figures for brownie points.

bk1 wrote:What does the fact that law is not diverse have to do with purposely differentiating yourself (race/ethnicity) and excluding people based on something that really shouldn't be affected by that (LSAT prep)?


Nada at all. In fact, my comments on diversity was made in reference to the below comment:

SMA22 wrote:law school is about diverse groups learning to see eye to eye, not highlighting their differences


bk1 wrote:The thing that bothers me about these types of threads, as well as threads like "January Applicants" or "English Major Applicants" or "12 Toed Applicants" and the like, is that I don't see a purpose in trying to commiserate with only a subset of people based on some arbitrary distinction. It reeks of a pointless need to feel special.


Awww, bummer. You hurt my feelings. :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:


But funny how you decided to make your feelings known in a thread that ...."bothers" you. May I suggest having a life outside TLS?


You're welcome. Toodles! :wink:

EDITED BY MOD

OUTING ANY REAL IDENTITIES WILL NOT BE TOLERATED ON TLS

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20121109
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby 20121109 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 8:32 pm

EbonyEsq - you are banned for outing my REAL NAME.

I sincerely hope that no one on this thread decided to tell others of my true identity. I've never PMed this poster, nor shared any personal information with her and yet she knows my IRL name. Please respect the privacy of others, even if you have terrible reasoning skills.

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Bildungsroman
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby Bildungsroman » Fri Jan 14, 2011 8:36 pm

The hell just happened?

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bk1
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby bk1 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 8:53 pm

EbonyEsq wrote:Case in point: Asians are generally not considered nor treated as a URM/person of color for admission purposes but for law school data it's another story. Once admitted, they are now considered "minorities" that add to a school's "diversity" which in turn helps boost the school's USNWR's diversity index...oh, you know, another one of those rankings that schools really really care about...

My point? Rankings are everything and many will exaggerate their figures for brownie points.


Do you understand that URM != person of color? Seriously, do you understand the fine distinction that URM specifically makes?

Asians are a minority, simple as that. I really don't see why the need to set them apart except to point out that they are not URM and therefore do not get a boost. Outside of that, it just seems stupid as they are a small population, just like any other non-white race/ethnicity in the U.S.

I'm also fairly sure you do not know how USNWR actually calculates their diversity index as it is not schools who choose whether to include Asians in that index.

EbonyEsq wrote:But funny how you decided to make your feelings known in a thread that ...."bothers" you. May I suggest having a life outside TLS?


I tried but the sunlight burned my skin so I retreated to the safety of my parents' basement again.

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whirledpeas86
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby whirledpeas86 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:45 pm

EbonyEsq wrote:1. What was your initial diagnostic score?
2. What was your score on test day?
3. How long did you study for this exam?
4. What tools/information/materials/advice did you use in preparing for this exam?
5. Did you take a prep course? If so, which, and was it helpful?
6. If it is one suggestion you would give on how to ace the LSAT, what is it?
Thank you for all your contributions!


1. Something like 162 or 163, don't remember exactly. After my second practice test, I consistently scored 170+
2. 167, rough games section and the pressure of taking the test for realsies played a role in my scoring less than my PT avg
3. approx 4 months
4. LSAT blog study guides, Powerscore Games and Logical Reasoning bibles (good introductions), ATLAS games and logical reasoning guides (these helped me tighten up my game after going through powerscore), 2 practice tests a week, studied with a partner which was really nice and actually made it kind of fun
5. Nope, was too cheap and figured I could get away with self-study
6. Take as many PTs as humanly possible in as close to day-of-test settings as you can manage, you want to get to the point where taking the test is like second nature

Good luck!

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SMA22
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby SMA22 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 11:05 pm

I just wanted to say, EVERYBODY's opinion is valuable to this thread; no one here is stupid or blind to concepts like white privilege, educational disparities, or discrimination in the workforce. However, several people said that prepping for law school involves the same type of technique regardless of race or ethnicity--hard work, focus, dedication, and the right tools. I am in agreement. Same goes for being poor, disabled, young, old, single, or having 5 wives and 10 kids. Work hard, and make no excuses.

Any person telling any other person how their experience should be or how it will be is doing the exact opposite of being a diversity candidate. Please, do not drive your future law school classmates crazy by having to be right all the time--we're in this together, black/white/red/yellow/purple people.

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Drake014
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Re: URMs scoring 160 or above

Postby Drake014 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 11:22 pm

Bildungsroman wrote:The hell just happened?


1. Black chick (we presume) makes a URM thread regarding LSAT prep
2. Minorities post to said thread because they're interested
3. Several posters, some minorities, some not, question why such thread exists
4. OP defends creation of the thread and outs the true identify of batman... I mean one of the mods who questioned the thread's creation
5. Said mod bans OP for outing them
6. ???
7. Profit
8. 5th base




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