Bisexual? Or more like Bi-Lame?

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
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AreJay711
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Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 8:51 pm

Re: Bisexual? Or more like Bi-Lame?

Postby AreJay711 » Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:42 pm

3|ink wrote:
booyakasha wrote:
3|ink wrote:
happyshapy wrote:Your explanation still doesn't make sense. So an AA who grew up in a middle class town with a "normal" upbringing doesn't have sufficient enough material to write a diversity statement?

I didn't say anything in my posts that wasn't "chill"


A homosexual would certainly have a unique perspective. However, I think that schools are looking for a bit more than that. Imagine if every white person who thought he/she had a very distinct political outlook were to submit a diversity statement. How many of them would benefit from this submission? Perhaps perspective does help, but I think a distinctive heritage is crucial.


This is completely and utterly wrong.


Feel free to elaborate if you're capable.

A diversity statement is a chance to tell them what unique perspectives you can bring to the school -- and most of them phrase it that way. While URM status is certainly a more tangible and material boost, anything that can distinguish you from other candidates with similar numbers is useful. Political views might be a stretch but LGBT people DO have unique perspectives that are different from straight people. It is right up there with an interesting personal history or experience. I did mine about growing up on a tobacco farm and paying my way through college working construction. It doesn't have to be unique but just a perspective you bring that many others will not.

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3|ink
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Re: Bisexual? Or more like Bi-Lame?

Postby 3|ink » Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:46 pm

AreJay711 wrote:A diversity statement is a chance to tell them what unique perspectives you can bring to the school -- and most of them phrase it that way. While URM status is certainly a more tangible and material boost, anything that can distinguish you from other candidates with similar numbers is useful. Political views might be a stretch but LGBT people DO have unique perspectives that are different from straight people. It is right up there with an interesting personal history or experience. I did mine about growing up on a tobacco farm and paying my way through college working construction. It doesn't have to be unique but just a perspective you bring that many others will not.


If you think that would help, go with it. But that sounds like information that should be included in your personal statement. Why be redundant with a diversity statement submission? In fact, I kind of remember you saying that you did include that information in your personal statement as well. It was on a comment you posted about another personal statement.

Edit: I suppose this all boils down to opinion. Can someone provide a counter-example to my principle? Has anyone ever benefited significantly from submitting a diversity statement while lacking a unique heritage?




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