Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
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dcman06
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Re: Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

Postby dcman06 » Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:58 am

DoubleChecks wrote:I havent read anything that points to the fact that Koreans, Chinese, and Indians get DOCKED points at law schools. Undergrad, prob. But I dont know about law schools, or at least I havent seen the data on that. And other Asian groups will be given preference but "probably" not as much as Black men and Hispanics? lol more like definitely.

And though I don't know the current state of Japanese Americans in US higher education, it's interesting you put them in between the 2 groups as they used to be the highest achieving Asians in America.


I should have probably reworded myself. I wouldn't say that Asian Americans automatically lose points applying at most schools, but at a minimum, they get no preference, and if they see an Asian and a White applicant, an admissions committee may go for the White applicant if the Asian American is Korean/Chinese/Indian all other things equal.

Considering that 7-8% of law applicants are Asian American, and less than 5% of the US is Asian American, they are over-represented. Maybe not like medical schools and at some colleges out west, but they're still overrepresented.

I'd put Japanese in between the two because an ever increasing proportion of Japanese Americans today are born and raised in America, and so are their parents and even their grandparents. Their culture is much more American than the other groups. For whatever reason, they're not as high achieving as they used to be among Asian Americans. Japanese Americans still are closer to the Korean/Chinese/Indian tier than the Filipino/Vietanmese/tier, but there were a couple things I read about admissions corroborating with this. Let me see if I can find them.

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Richie Tenenbaum
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Re: Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

Postby Richie Tenenbaum » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:21 am

dcman06 wrote:
DoubleChecks wrote:I havent read anything that points to the fact that Koreans, Chinese, and Indians get DOCKED points at law schools. Undergrad, prob. But I dont know about law schools, or at least I havent seen the data on that. And other Asian groups will be given preference but "probably" not as much as Black men and Hispanics? lol more like definitely.

And though I don't know the current state of Japanese Americans in US higher education, it's interesting you put them in between the 2 groups as they used to be the highest achieving Asians in America.


I should have probably reworded myself. I wouldn't say that Asian Americans automatically lose points applying at most schools, but at a minimum, they get no preference, and if they see an Asian and a White applicant, an admissions committee may go for the White applicant if the Asian American is Korean/Chinese/Indian all other things equal.

Considering that 7-8% of law applicants are Asian American, and less than 5% of the US is Asian American, they are over-represented. Maybe not like medical schools and at some colleges out west, but they're still overrepresented.

I'd put Japanese in between the two because an ever increasing proportion of Japanese Americans today are born and raised in America, and so are their parents and even their grandparents. Their culture is much more American than the other groups. For whatever reason, they're not as high achieving as they used to be among Asian Americans. Japanese Americans still are closer to the Korean/Chinese/Indian tier than the Filipino/Vietanmese/tier, but there were a couple things I read about admissions corroborating with this. Let me see if I can find them.


The easiest way to corroborate this is by naming apps where they specify between Korean/Chinese/Indian and Filipino/Vietnamese/etc.

I don't think any of the law schools apps I filled out did so.

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burger lover
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Re: Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

Postby burger lover » Tue Oct 26, 2010 10:06 am

Richie Tenenbaum wrote:
The easiest way to corroborate this is by naming apps where they specify between Korean/Chinese/Indian and Filipino/Vietnamese/etc.

I don't think any of the law schools apps I filled out did so.


columbia has separate boxes for asian-pacific islander, south asian, and southeast asian.
ucla has 8-9 different options under the asian category. not sure how significant that is; they also have 4-5 under hispanic and even 2-3 under white.
those are the only two schools i remember off-hand.

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dcman06
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Re: Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

Postby dcman06 » Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:38 am

Richie Tenenbaum wrote:The easiest way to corroborate this is by naming apps where they specify between Korean/Chinese/Indian and Filipino/Vietnamese/etc.

I don't think any of the law schools apps I filled out did so.


Law admissions committees aren't gonna be silly and think all Asians are the same. For example, two Asians apply to school X that doesn't distinguish Asian groups. Juanita Fernandez is Asian, and so is Jake Singh (both just examples). It's reasonable to infer that Juanita is likely Filipino and Jake is Indian especially if they mention their heritage somewhere in their diversity statment, or personal essay, etc.

Maybe law committees would raise some flags is if another hypothetical Asian applicant (by race), let's call her Jenny Kim applies to School X and says that she is Hispanic, and/or Black. And it's definitely possible that Jenny Kim could be Black and Asian (Black mom/dad and Asian mom/dad) or be Hispanic (Jenny was born in Argentina, moved to USA when she was 13 and could only speak Spanish upon entering); or both (one of Jenny's parents is Black and she was born and raised in Latin America).... Of course, that could also be in the statements.

bdubs
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Re: Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

Postby bdubs » Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:50 am

dcman06 wrote:Law admissions committees aren't gonna be silly and think all Asians are the same. For example, two Asians apply to school X that doesn't distinguish Asian groups. Juanita Fernandez is Asian, and so is Jake Singh (both just examples). It's reasonable to infer that Juanita is likely Filipino and Jake is Indian especially if they mention their heritage somewhere in their diversity statment, or personal essay, etc.

Maybe law committees would raise some flags is if another hypothetical Asian applicant (by race), let's call her Jenny Kim applies to School X and says that she is Hispanic, and/or Black. And it's definitely possible that Jenny Kim could be Black and Asian (Black mom/dad and Asian mom/dad) or be Hispanic (Jenny was born in Argentina, moved to USA when she was 13 and could only speak Spanish upon entering); or both (one of Jenny's parents is Black and she was born and raised in Latin America).... Of course, that could also be in the statements.


Does your hypo-applicant get counted as black, asian, and hispanic for class profile? If so, she is in everywhere.

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dcman06
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Re: Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

Postby dcman06 » Tue Oct 26, 2010 1:44 pm

bdubs wrote:
dcman06 wrote:Law admissions committees aren't gonna be silly and think all Asians are the same. For example, two Asians apply to school X that doesn't distinguish Asian groups. Juanita Fernandez is Asian, and so is Jake Singh (both just examples). It's reasonable to infer that Juanita is likely Filipino and Jake is Indian especially if they mention their heritage somewhere in their diversity statment, or personal essay, etc.

Maybe law committees would raise some flags is if another hypothetical Asian applicant (by race), let's call her Jenny Kim applies to School X and says that she is Hispanic, and/or Black. And it's definitely possible that Jenny Kim could be Black and Asian (Black mom/dad and Asian mom/dad) or be Hispanic (Jenny was born in Argentina, moved to USA when she was 13 and could only speak Spanish upon entering); or both (one of Jenny's parents is Black and she was born and raised in Latin America).... Of course, that could also be in the statements.


Does your hypo-applicant get counted as black, asian, and hispanic for class profile? If so, she is in everywhere.


I'm a guy, but the hypo applicant (Jenny Kim is I think you're referring to) could mark herself as Black, Hispanic and Asian. I guess it's a matter of preference. She also needs a decent LSAT score, grades, etc. too, but finding someone like that will be a quite the diversified applicant.

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bk1
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Re: Do Asians, even though they're not URMs, get a boost?

Postby bk1 » Tue Oct 26, 2010 1:53 pm

dcman06 wrote:I'm a guy, but the hypo applicant (Jenny Kim is I think you're referring to) could mark herself as Black, Hispanic and Asian. I guess it's a matter of preference. She also needs a decent LSAT score, grades, etc. too, but finding someone like that will be a quite the diversified applicant.


Via this data on LSAC(http://www.lsac.org/LSACResources/Data/ ... nicity.asp) I believe multiracial individuals are considered "Other" because the percentages add up to 100 (or close to it due to rounding) and not over 100. When schools report it on their websites, they say things like "% minority students" or "% students of color" and don't seem to differentiate.

FWIW I am White, Hispanic, and Asian (close but not quite to your hypo applicant :P).




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