Are different minorities favored during admissions?

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
berkeleygirl21
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Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby berkeleygirl21 » Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:52 pm

Will you receive more points for being of one ethnic group than another? I'm just curious because I saw that "Asians" were under the minority list. Does being Indian or Chinese really give you a leg up the same way being African America or Hispanic would? Is this a terribly un-PC question?

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JordynAsh
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby JordynAsh » Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:55 pm

Only African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Puerto Ricans receive the URM boost.

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20121109
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby 20121109 » Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:56 pm

JordynAsh wrote:Only African Americans, Mexican Americans, Native Americans and Puerto Ricans receive the URM boost.


ftfy

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JordynAsh
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby JordynAsh » Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:56 pm

GAIAtheCHEERLEADER wrote:
JordynAsh wrote:Only African Americans, Mexican Americans, Native Americans and Puerto Ricans receive the URM boost.


ftfy


Damn I always forget the Native Americans :(

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JordynAsh
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby JordynAsh » Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:01 pm

Nightrunner wrote::?


I'm sorry Nightrunner! To clarify, I don't forget *about* Native Americans, I just forget they're URMs. This used to be a bone of contention with an ex.

BenJ
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby BenJ » Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:33 am

No. Asians are just an excuse for schools to up their "students of color" percentage that they tout to prospective students without breaking it down. (So, for example, Columbia claims to be around 40% "students of color," but that amounts to about 30% Asian and 10% black/Hispanic/NA/etc.)

ram jam
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby ram jam » Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:38 am

Sad but true, not all minorities are weighted equally.

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kaydish21
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby kaydish21 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:40 am

Most candidates from South American and Central American countries receive a very noticable URM boost. Let's not be ignorant and pretend only Puerto Rico and Mexico have prospective lawyers that face disadvantages in education and opportunity starting at an early age.

ram jam
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby ram jam » Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:48 am

kaydish21 wrote:Most South American and Central American receive a very noticable URM boost. Let's not be ignorant and pretend only Puerto Rico and Mexico have prospective lawyers that face disadvantages in education and opportunity starting at an early age.


One would think this to be true. But South Americans and Caribbean Hispanics (Other than Puerto Ricans) do not qualify as minorities. Being part of small ethnic group within a larger ethnic group does not alone qualify you as a minority. Minority status has been fought for politically. Therefore, a minority group has to be less in number than the the largest ethnic group, but large enough in number to matter politically. Also, South Americans do not consider themselves people of color. I had a laugh at the 2010 census, when I had to describe the race of my two south american room mates, I asked them if they were white, black or cholo. First of all, cholo is nearly a racial derogatory term in Spanish, second, what we might call a cholo in the US is very different than what a south american would consider as a cholo. So, I described them as white, though their parents were both mixed racially between Spanish/Indigenous.

I would dare say that URM with a political minority status such as Mex, PR, AA, NA have a greater boost than Cuban Americans or Ecuadorian Americans, etc.

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baboon309
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby baboon309 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:56 am

ram jam wrote:
[strike]One would think this to be true. But South Americans and Caribbean Hispanics (Other than Puerto Ricans) do not qualify as minorities. Being part of small ethnic group within a larger ethnic group does not alone qualify you as a minority. Minority status has been fought for politically. Therefore, a minority group has to be less in number than the the largest ethnic group, but large enough in number to matter politically. Also, South Americans do not consider themselves people of color. I had a laugh at the 2010 census, when I had to describe the race of my two south american room mates, I asked them if they were white, black or cholo. First of all, cholo is nearly a racial derogatory term in Spanish, second, what we might call a cholo in the US is very different than what a south american would consider as a cholo. So, I described them as white, though their parents were both mixed racially between Spanish/Indigenous.
[/strike]


Not true.
A lot of my low 150s South American/Carribean Hispanic friends got in T25 with $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.

ram jam
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby ram jam » Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:59 am

baboon309 wrote:
ram jam wrote:
[strike]One would think this to be true. But South Americans and Caribbean Hispanics (Other than Puerto Ricans) do not qualify as minorities. Being part of small ethnic group within a larger ethnic group does not alone qualify you as a minority. Minority status has been fought for politically. Therefore, a minority group has to be less in number than the the largest ethnic group, but large enough in number to matter politically. Also, South Americans do not consider themselves people of color. I had a laugh at the 2010 census, when I had to describe the race of my two south american room mates, I asked them if they were white, black or cholo. First of all, cholo is nearly a racial derogatory term in Spanish, second, what we might call a cholo in the US is very different than what a south american would consider as a cholo. So, I described them as white, though their parents were both mixed racially between Spanish/Indigenous.
[/strike]


Not true.
A lot of my low 150s South American/Carribean Hispanic friends got in T25 with $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.



Are you a member of the South American Low-150s club? How many of these people can u possibly know in order to disprove what I am saying? In actuality, you may be right, but seriously, where did you meet all of these 150s scoring South Americans?

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kaydish21
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby kaydish21 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:00 am

baboon309 wrote:
ram jam wrote:
[strike]One would think this to be true. But South Americans and Caribbean Hispanics (Other than Puerto Ricans) do not qualify as minorities. Being part of small ethnic group within a larger ethnic group does not alone qualify you as a minority. Minority status has been fought for politically. Therefore, a minority group has to be less in number than the the largest ethnic group, but large enough in number to matter politically. Also, South Americans do not consider themselves people of color. I had a laugh at the 2010 census, when I had to describe the race of my two south american room mates, I asked them if they were white, black or cholo. First of all, cholo is nearly a racial derogatory term in Spanish, second, what we might call a cholo in the US is very different than what a south american would consider as a cholo. So, I described them as white, though their parents were both mixed racially between Spanish/Indigenous.
[/strike]


Not true.
A lot of my low 150s South American/Carribean Hispanic friends got in T25 with $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.


Was it merit based? I agree with the point here, but I think the distinction is worth noting.

Either way this this is right, there is a political distinction, however as far as law school admissions go these areas receive the full "URM" boost. I know of several people who scored in the upper 140s and have been admitted to T1 schools and some of the more competitive T2 schools.

kgirl
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby kgirl » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:03 am

I know for medical school, there is a quota system at least in my home town; There are more Asian applicants than there are spots available to them. I hear it's 1/4 Chinese, 1/4 Indian, 1/4 Jewish, 1/4 everyone else. Isn't the admissions committee smart? I am not talking about the U.S; this is in another country.


For law school, I would say the majority of applicants are Caucasian, having an URM status probably helps. Not sure about Asians though (Chinese and Korean).

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baboon309
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby baboon309 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:06 am

ram jam wrote:
baboon309 wrote:
ram jam wrote:
[strike]One would think this to be true. But South Americans and Caribbean Hispanics (Other than Puerto Ricans) do not qualify as minorities. Being part of small ethnic group within a larger ethnic group does not alone qualify you as a minority. Minority status has been fought for politically. Therefore, a minority group has to be less in number than the the largest ethnic group, but large enough in number to matter politically. Also, South Americans do not consider themselves people of color. I had a laugh at the 2010 census, when I had to describe the race of my two south american room mates, I asked them if they were white, black or cholo. First of all, cholo is nearly a racial derogatory term in Spanish, second, what we might call a cholo in the US is very different than what a south american would consider as a cholo. So, I described them as white, though their parents were both mixed racially between Spanish/Indigenous.
[/strike]


Not true.
A lot of my low 150s South American/Carribean Hispanic friends got in T25 with $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.



Are you a member of the South American Low-150s club? How many of these people can u possibly know in order to disprove what I am saying? In actuality, you may be right, but seriously, where did you meet all of these 150s scoring South Americans?


I went to a cheap TTT undergrad. I believe that the average LSAT in my school is sub 155.

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Unemployed
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby Unemployed » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:08 am

BenJ wrote:No. Asians are just an excuse for schools to up their "students of color" percentage that they tout to prospective students without breaking it down. (So, for example, Columbia claims to be around 40% "students of color," but that amounts to about 30% Asian and 10% black/Hispanic/NA/etc.)


I have a problem with the premise that Asians are somehow deficient as minorities, but setting that aside, Columbia's most recent class is 21% Asian, 10% African American, 6% Hispanic, and (sadly) 0.25% Native American.

NYU currently stands at 10.6% Asian, 7.5% African American, 6% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American. Surely, this is not a product of its integrity or unwillingness to play the diversity game.

OnWisconsin
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby OnWisconsin » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:11 am

What's the quota for Gingers?

I didn't see a box to check for "transparent" on my applications.

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moandersen
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby moandersen » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:13 am

kgirl wrote:For law school, I would say the majority of applicants are Caucasian, having an URM status probably helps. Not sure about Asians though (Chinese and Korean).


hating on the japanese?! :wink:

sure we are probably one of the least represented asians in the US, but show some love!

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baboon309
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby baboon309 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:14 am

kaydish21 wrote:
baboon309 wrote:
ram jam wrote:
[strike]One would think this to be true. But South Americans and Caribbean Hispanics (Other than Puerto Ricans) do not qualify as minorities. Being part of small ethnic group within a larger ethnic group does not alone qualify you as a minority. Minority status has been fought for politically. Therefore, a minority group has to be less in number than the the largest ethnic group, but large enough in number to matter politically. Also, South Americans do not consider themselves people of color. I had a laugh at the 2010 census, when I had to describe the race of my two south american room mates, I asked them if they were white, black or cholo. First of all, cholo is nearly a racial derogatory term in Spanish, second, what we might call a cholo in the US is very different than what a south american would consider as a cholo. So, I described them as white, though their parents were both mixed racially between Spanish/Indigenous.
[/strike]


Not true.
A lot of my low 150s South American/Carribean Hispanic friends got in T25 with $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.


Was it merit based? I agree with the point here, but I think the distinction is worth noting.

Yes.

Either way this this is right, there is a political distinction, however as far as law school admissions go these areas receive the full "URM" boost. I know of several people who scored in the upper 140s and have been admitted to T1 schools and some of the more competitive T2 schools.

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kaydish21
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby kaydish21 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:17 am

baboon309 wrote:
kaydish21 wrote:
baboon309 wrote:
ram jam wrote:
[strike]One would think this to be true. But South Americans and Caribbean Hispanics (Other than Puerto Ricans) do not qualify as minorities. Being part of small ethnic group within a larger ethnic group does not alone qualify you as a minority. Minority status has been fought for politically. Therefore, a minority group has to be less in number than the the largest ethnic group, but large enough in number to matter politically. Also, South Americans do not consider themselves people of color. I had a laugh at the 2010 census, when I had to describe the race of my two south american room mates, I asked them if they were white, black or cholo. First of all, cholo is nearly a racial derogatory term in Spanish, second, what we might call a cholo in the US is very different than what a south american would consider as a cholo. So, I described them as white, though their parents were both mixed racially between Spanish/Indigenous.
[/strike]


Not true.
A lot of my low 150s South American/Carribean Hispanic friends got in T25 with $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.


Was it merit based? I agree with the point here, but I think the distinction is worth noting.

Yes.

Either way this this is right, there is a political distinction, however as far as law school admissions go these areas receive the full "URM" boost. I know of several people who scored in the upper 140s and have been admitted to T1 schools and some of the more competitive T2 schools.


That's awesome. Many congratulations and it's nice to see at least some adcoms looking holistically.

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ogman05
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby ogman05 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:18 am

It's about underrepresentation, not minority status. FYI. And most minorities are broadly grouped. For example if you are Laotian it is just considered asian/ No boost even if you are the only laotian that would be at the school. HTH

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Unemployed
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby Unemployed » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:20 am

ogman05 wrote:It's about underrepresentation, not minority status. FYI. And most minorities are broadly grouped. For example if you are Laotian it is just considered asian/ No boost even if you are the only laotian that would be at the school. HTH


Right. That's really narrowly tailored. :evil:

Flanker1067
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby Flanker1067 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:22 am

I am just going to throw this out there.

I am Mex, and I received zero URM boost. My cycle went almost exactly according to LawSchoolPredictor without the checked URM box. I was waitlisted at almost (got in to one) all my "consider" schools, which were all "admit" with the box checked. I have not gotten into any "weak consider" or "deny" schools. For my own interest I have been searching URM's on LSN and it seems the boost is largely skewed towards AA.

I am not complaining about this, my numbers were fine to get me into places I want to go and I don't necessarily even feel that people deserve a boost. I am just stating that this Mex URM boost is not some sort of magical "get into anywhere" card, even if I wish it was.

/rant

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baboon309
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby baboon309 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:25 am

Flanker1067 wrote:I am just going to throw this out there.

I am Mex, and I received zero URM boost. My cycle went almost exactly according to LawSchoolPredictor without the checked URM box. I was waitlisted at almost (got in to one) all my "consider" schools, which were all "admit" with the box checked. I have not gotten into any "weak consider" or "deny" schools. For my own interest I have been searching URM's on LSN and it seems the boost is largely skewed towards AA.

I am not complaining about this, my numbers were fine to get me into places I want to go and I don't necessarily even feel that people deserve a boost. I am just stating that this Mex URM boost is not some sort of magical "get into anywhere" card, even if I wish it was.

/rant


It's probably because of your GPA. All the South Ameircan/Hispanic frds of mine who got in T1 schools with $$$$$$ have 3.8+ GPA.

orphanarium
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby orphanarium » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:30 am

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Last edited by orphanarium on Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

Flanker1067
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Re: Are different minorities favored during admissions?

Postby Flanker1067 » Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:38 am

baboon309 wrote:
Flanker1067 wrote:I am just going to throw this out there.

I am Mex, and I received zero URM boost. My cycle went almost exactly according to LawSchoolPredictor without the checked URM box. I was waitlisted at almost (got in to one) all my "consider" schools, which were all "admit" with the box checked. I have not gotten into any "weak consider" or "deny" schools. For my own interest I have been searching URM's on LSN and it seems the boost is largely skewed towards AA.

I am not complaining about this, my numbers were fine to get me into places I want to go and I don't necessarily even feel that people deserve a boost. I am just stating that this Mex URM boost is not some sort of magical "get into anywhere" card, even if I wish it was.

/rant


It's probably because of your GPA. All the South Ameircan/Hispanic frds of mine who got in T1 schools with $$$$$$ have 3.8+ GPA.


This could be true, it does seem that schools are more friendly to URM reverse splitters then URM splitters, via my own looking through LSN. Still, I thought it would be rarer to be a URM with a high LSAT then one with a high GPA. Oh well, what can you do.




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