Top conservative law schools

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vet4lawschool
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby vet4lawschool » Mon Feb 02, 2009 1:27 pm

Marmot wrote:
Luke wrote:

Go to Liberty or Regent if you want to talk to dittoheads all day.



haha that is funny :shock:

pomona
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby pomona » Mon Feb 02, 2009 1:34 pm

jungleshark wrote:I actually applied to Berkeley because it is ranked high, it is relatively inexpensive, and the winters are not cold. However, I would appreciate any insight as to whether a very conservative person would be comfortable there. If the school seems large and pluralistic, I might be able to survive there. But I wouldn't want to be in an environment that is repressive towards people like me.

From what I've heard, conservatives may be less comfortable there, even compared to other highly ranked schools that also tend to be geared toward the left.

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seraphita
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby seraphita » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:17 pm

I do have share a number of positions with liberals, such as opposition to war. But culturally, I'm conservative. And yes, John Yoo does teach at Berkeley.


Oh . . . well, if you're an anti-war conservative, John Yoo may not be your cup of tea.

Maybe you could contact the Federalist Society chapters or Christian groups at the schools where you get accepted, and ask them about the campus atmosphere. Also, law schools in the South, like Virginia, Duke, or Vanderbilt, might be more accommodating towards conservatives than, say, schools in Northern California or NYC.

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Teapot
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby Teapot » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:26 pm

i go to one of the most liberal ug institutions on the planet, and i'm pretty conservative, religiously and politically. i'd say being around people you disagree with is usually a lot of fun. i don't think its something to run from. i do not however, think you would be a homophobe or scared of divergent opinions if you went to a conservative school.

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Skadden Stairs
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby Skadden Stairs » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:40 pm

Teapot wrote: i do not however, think you would be a homophobe or scared of divergent opinions if you went to a conservative school.

Wanting to go to a conservative school doesn't make me think someone is a homophobe. This does:
jungleshark wrote:I think one indicator of a law school being liberal is whether the application asks if you are homosexual. Applications to Penn and Cornell ask you if you're homosexual or if you're transgendered. I applied to Penn because it's well-regarded, but I'm hoping I get into a well-regarded school that's not quite as liberal. Also browse through the viewbook and see what the students & faculty look like (how they're dressed, etc...). I looked at UCLA's viewbook and I also looked at Vanderbilt's viewbook and there is a big difference. Vanderbilt looks more conservative. UCLA has an institute on sexual orientation; that is a sign of it being liberal. Also, notice that Texas's non-discrimination policy does not include "sexual orientation;" that may be a good sign if you're conservative. Penn's non-discrimination policy, on the other hand, not only includes sexual orientation, but even "gender identity." Penn is apparently way ahead of the game in terms of being liberal. I think Penn also tried to get military recruiters banned from campus because the army doesn't permit open professions of homosexuality.

:roll:

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Teapot
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby Teapot » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:41 pm

lex talionis wrote:
Teapot wrote: i do not however, think you would be a homophobe or scared of divergent opinions if you went to a conservative school.

Wanting to go to a conservative school doesn't make me think someone is a homophobe. This does:
jungleshark wrote:I think one indicator of a law school being liberal is whether the application asks if you are homosexual. Applications to Penn and Cornell ask you if you're homosexual or if you're transgendered. I applied to Penn because it's well-regarded, but I'm hoping I get into a well-regarded school that's not quite as liberal. Also browse through the viewbook and see what the students & faculty look like (how they're dressed, etc...). I looked at UCLA's viewbook and I also looked at Vanderbilt's viewbook and there is a big difference. Vanderbilt looks more conservative. UCLA has an institute on sexual orientation; that is a sign of it being liberal. Also, notice that Texas's non-discrimination policy does not include "sexual orientation;" that may be a good sign if you're conservative. Penn's non-discrimination policy, on the other hand, not only includes sexual orientation, but even "gender identity." Penn is apparently way ahead of the game in terms of being liberal. I think Penn also tried to get military recruiters banned from campus because the army doesn't permit open professions of homosexuality.

:roll:

touché

pomona
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby pomona » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:44 pm

dresden doll wrote:
jungleshark wrote:I think one indicator of a law school being liberal is whether the application asks if you are homosexual. Applications to Penn and Cornell ask you if you're homosexual or if you're transgendered. I applied to Penn because it's well-regarded, but I'm hoping I get into a well-regarded school that's not quite as liberal. Also browse through the viewbook and see what the students & faculty look like (how they're dressed, etc...). I looked at UCLA's viewbook and I also looked at Vanderbilt's viewbook and there is a big difference. Vanderbilt looks more conservative. UCLA has an institute on sexual orientation; that is a sign of it being liberal. Also, notice that Texas's non-discrimination policy does not include "sexual orientation;" that may be a good sign if you're conservative. Penn's non-discrimination policy, on the other hand, not only includes sexual orientation, but even "gender identity." Penn is apparently way ahead of the game in terms of being liberal. I think Penn also tried to get military recruiters banned from campus because the army doesn't permit open professions of homosexuality.


I just love how the seeming lack of acceptance of/accommodation for gays can be used as a criteria for identifying 'good' schools worth applying to.

God, I'm glad I'm liberal.

OP, in choosing my schools, I strove for just the opposite of what you're trying to do: I made sure not to apply to any conservative schools, which wasn't too hard seeing how the highest ranked schools don't tend to be afflicted with right-wing thinking anyway. For your benefit, here's a list of 10 most conservative schools, as per PR:

1. Regent
2. Ave Maria
3. Brigham Young
4. George Mason
5. University of Notre Dame
6. Louisiana State
7. University of Alabama
8. Campbell
9. Texas Tech
10. University of Mississippi

Conversely, here's a list of schools you might care to avoid:
1. University of the District of Columbia
2. Northeastern
3. City University of New York - Queens College
4. Lewis and Clark College
5. American
6. Vermont
7. University of Oregon
8. University of California, Berkeley
9. New York University
10. University of Maine

Enjoy!


Does anyone have any experience with/knowledge of George Mason being socially conservative? I know they tend to have more of a libertarian/free market bent in their views on economics and seem favorable to the military, but I'm wondering if it's all that socially conservative.

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dresden doll
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby dresden doll » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:50 pm

^I don't know of GM being associated with any other brand of conservatism beyond their championing of the free market economy. That said, it has generally been my experience that economic conservatism tends to walk hand in hand with the social one.

anewaphorist
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby anewaphorist » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:51 pm

It is interesting how conservatives appear to feel threatened by diversity of opinion, whereas liberals tend to embrace it. Perhaps it is important that liberals enjoy subjecting their views to criticism so as to better craft a worldview, whereas conservatives prefer to self-delude.

On an unrelated note, just because George Mason has Alex Tabbarok and Tyler Cowen does not make the school libertarian.

pomona
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby pomona » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:52 pm

dresden doll wrote:^I don't know of GM being associated with any other brand of conservatism beyond their championing of the free market economy. That said, it has generally been my experience that economic conservatism tends to walk hand in hand with the social one.

I haven't had the same experience (when dealing with libertarians, anyhow).

pomona
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby pomona » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:56 pm

anewaphorist wrote:It is interesting how conservatives appear to feel threatened by diversity of opinion, whereas liberals tend to embrace it. Perhaps it is important that liberals enjoy subjecting their views to criticism so as to better craft a worldview, whereas conservatives prefer to self-delude.

On an unrelated note, just because George Mason has Alex Tabbarok and Tyler Cowen does not make the school libertarian.

There are more people favorable to libertarian ideas than just Tabbarok and Cowen: Boettke, Leeson, Zywicki, Somin, Caplan, Vernon Smith, Boudreaux, not to mention Buchanan and Tullock (both emeritus), to name a few...

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dresden doll
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby dresden doll » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:58 pm

pomona wrote:
dresden doll wrote:^I don't know of GM being associated with any other brand of conservatism beyond their championing of the free market economy. That said, it has generally been my experience that economic conservatism tends to walk hand in hand with the social one.

I haven't had the same experience (when dealing with libertarians, anyhow).


A distinction ought to be made between libertarians and conservatives, however. Libertarians prefer hands-off approach in terms of both economy and social policy. Conservatives, on the other hand, champion the hands-off approach economy-wise but like to regulate a variety of social matters (abortion, gay marriage, etc.). Liberals, for their part, prefer freedom from governmental intervention in terms of social policy, but welcome regulations in the realm of economy. It almost seems sometimes that libertarians are the least hypocritical of the three.

Disclaimer: there are obviously many distinctions/variances that the above summary glosses over.

pomona
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby pomona » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:01 pm

dresden doll wrote:
pomona wrote:
dresden doll wrote:^I don't know of GM being associated with any other brand of conservatism beyond their championing of the free market economy. That said, it has generally been my experience that economic conservatism tends to walk hand in hand with the social one.

I haven't had the same experience (when dealing with libertarians, anyhow).


A distinction ought to be made between libertarians and conservatives, however. Libertarians prefer hands-off approach in terms of both economy and social policy. Conservatives, on the other hand, champion the hands-off approach economy-wise but like to regulate a variety of social matters (abortion, gay marriage, etc.). Liberals, for their part, prefer freedom from governmental intervention in terms of social policy, but welcome regulations in the realm of economy. It almost seems sometimes that libertarians are the least hypocritical of the three.

Disclaimer: there are obviously many distinctions/variances that the above summary glosses over.

Good point in making the distinction; I'd generally agree with your summary.

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benh2os
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby benh2os » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:02 pm

I go to GMU, and while I don't always agree with them, the economists here are awesome and know their stuff. I would say no more than half would lean more libertarian. I don't know about the law school. (on a side note Leeson has a supply/demand curve tattooed to his arm)

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Mitchske
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby Mitchske » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:04 pm

jungleshark wrote:I think one indicator of a law school being liberal is whether the application asks if you are homosexual. Applications to Penn and Cornell ask you if you're homosexual or if you're transgendered. I applied to Penn because it's well-regarded, but I'm hoping I get into a well-regarded school that's not quite as liberal. Also browse through the viewbook and see what the students & faculty look like (how they're dressed, etc...). I looked at UCLA's viewbook and I also looked at Vanderbilt's viewbook and there is a big difference. Vanderbilt looks more conservative. UCLA has an institute on sexual orientation; that is a sign of it being liberal. Also, notice that Texas's non-discrimination policy does not include "sexual orientation;" that may be a good sign if you're conservative. Penn's non-discrimination policy, on the other hand, not only includes sexual orientation, but even "gender identity." Penn is apparently way ahead of the game in terms of being liberal. I think Penn also tried to get military recruiters banned from campus because the army doesn't permit open professions of homosexuality.



You're quite ignorant. The University of Texas doesn't include sexual orientation in its non-discrimination policy due to being a public school in the state of Texas and the state legislature's attitudes. Rallies went on last semester that are trying to allow glbt faculty members at The University of Texas to receive partnership benefits.

I'm not sure why denying rights to GLBT is so important to you, but perhaps you need to reexamine your notions of equality and justice.

green
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby green » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:05 pm

dresden doll wrote:
pomona wrote:
dresden doll wrote:^I don't know of GM being associated with any other brand of conservatism beyond their championing of the free market economy. That said, it has generally been my experience that economic conservatism tends to walk hand in hand with the social one.

I haven't had the same experience (when dealing with libertarians, anyhow).


A distinction ought to be made between libertarians and conservatives, however. Libertarians prefer hands-off approach in terms of both economy and social policy. Conservatives, on the other hand, champion the hands-off approach economy-wise but like to regulate a variety of social matters (abortion, gay marriage, etc.). Liberals, for their part, prefer freedom from governmental intervention in terms of social policy, but welcome regulations in the realm of economy. It almost seems sometimes that libertarians are the least hypocritical of the three.

Disclaimer: there are obviously many distinctions/variances that the above summary glosses over.


I would disagree that liberals prefer less regulation in terms of social policy. In fact, I think they are as regulatory as "conservatives" in that respect. I kind of view the Democrats and Republicans as parties of big government, but in different directions. In that sense, the Republican party today isn't really a truly "conservative" party. Libertarians are actually closer to classical liberalism in my opinion, but that's just me.

de5igual
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby de5igual » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:08 pm

Mitchske wrote:
jungleshark wrote:I think one indicator of a law school being liberal is whether the application asks if you are homosexual. Applications to Penn and Cornell ask you if you're homosexual or if you're transgendered. I applied to Penn because it's well-regarded, but I'm hoping I get into a well-regarded school that's not quite as liberal. Also browse through the viewbook and see what the students & faculty look like (how they're dressed, etc...). I looked at UCLA's viewbook and I also looked at Vanderbilt's viewbook and there is a big difference. Vanderbilt looks more conservative. UCLA has an institute on sexual orientation; that is a sign of it being liberal. Also, notice that Texas's non-discrimination policy does not include "sexual orientation;" that may be a good sign if you're conservative. Penn's non-discrimination policy, on the other hand, not only includes sexual orientation, but even "gender identity." Penn is apparently way ahead of the game in terms of being liberal. I think Penn also tried to get military recruiters banned from campus because the army doesn't permit open professions of homosexuality.



You're quite ignorant. The University of Texas doesn't include sexual orientation in its non-discrimination policy due to being a public school in the state of Texas and the state legislature's attitudes. Rallies went on last semester that are trying to allow glbt faculty members at The University of Texas to receive partnership benefits.

I'm not sure why denying rights to GLBT is so important to you, but perhaps you need to reexamine your notions of equality and justice.


cause it goes against his christian "values"...duh!

jungleshark
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby jungleshark » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:10 pm

Mitchske wrote:
jungleshark wrote:I think one indicator of a law school being liberal is whether the application asks if you are homosexual. Applications to Penn and Cornell ask you if you're homosexual or if you're transgendered. I applied to Penn because it's well-regarded, but I'm hoping I get into a well-regarded school that's not quite as liberal. Also browse through the viewbook and see what the students & faculty look like (how they're dressed, etc...). I looked at UCLA's viewbook and I also looked at Vanderbilt's viewbook and there is a big difference. Vanderbilt looks more conservative. UCLA has an institute on sexual orientation; that is a sign of it being liberal. Also, notice that Texas's non-discrimination policy does not include "sexual orientation;" that may be a good sign if you're conservative. Penn's non-discrimination policy, on the other hand, not only includes sexual orientation, but even "gender identity." Penn is apparently way ahead of the game in terms of being liberal. I think Penn also tried to get military recruiters banned from campus because the army doesn't permit open professions of homosexuality.



You're quite ignorant. The University of Texas doesn't include sexual orientation in its non-discrimination policy due to being a public school in the state of Texas and the state legislature's attitudes. Rallies went on last semester that are trying to allow glbt faculty members at The University of Texas to receive partnership benefits.

I'm not sure why denying rights to GLBT is so important to you, but perhaps you need to reexamine your notions of equality and justice.




I said that is a sign that the school might be more conservative than other law schools (probably because it is a public school under the direction of a conservative legislature.) There is evidently a movement for gay rights that exists there, but it is not strong enough to dominate.

jungleshark
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby jungleshark » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:16 pm

I want to clarify something regarding the distinction between liberals, libertarians, and conservatives. Libertarianism is strictly a political ideology. Conservativism, on the other hand, may refer to political conservatism, or it might refer to cultural conservatism. I consider myself both libertarian and conservative, that is, culturally conservative. Politically, I am libertarian, but at the same time, I believe in traditional Christian values.

cakewalker
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby cakewalker » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:19 pm

f0bolous wrote:cause it goes against his christian "values"...duh!

:roll:

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dresden doll
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby dresden doll » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:20 pm

green wrote:
dresden doll wrote:
pomona wrote:
dresden doll wrote:^I don't know of GM being associated with any other brand of conservatism beyond their championing of the free market economy. That said, it has generally been my experience that economic conservatism tends to walk hand in hand with the social one.

I haven't had the same experience (when dealing with libertarians, anyhow).


A distinction ought to be made between libertarians and conservatives, however. Libertarians prefer hands-off approach in terms of both economy and social policy. Conservatives, on the other hand, champion the hands-off approach economy-wise but like to regulate a variety of social matters (abortion, gay marriage, etc.). Liberals, for their part, prefer freedom from governmental intervention in terms of social policy, but welcome regulations in the realm of economy. It almost seems sometimes that libertarians are the least hypocritical of the three.

Disclaimer: there are obviously many distinctions/variances that the above summary glosses over.


I would disagree that liberals prefer less regulation in terms of social policy. In fact, I think they are as regulatory as "conservatives" in that respect. I kind of view the Democrats and Republicans as parties of big government, but in different directions. In that sense, the Republican party today isn't really a truly "conservative" party. Libertarians are actually closer to classical liberalism in my opinion, but that's just me.


You bring up decent points. What I meant to indicate in describing liberals as preferring less governmental intrusion in matters of social policy was that they tend to champion freedom of individual choice in realms of issues like abortion, gay marriage or euthanasia, whereas conservatives generally argue that individual choices should be the preeminent force economy-wise. I would, however, agree that they both prefer big government, so long as that big government is interfering with what they feel warrants such interference.

Also, I don't think it's far fetched to conceive of libertarianism as classical liberalism, insofar as classical liberalism does count Adam Smith, the proverbial father of the free trade doctrine, in its ranks.

jungleshark
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby jungleshark » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:26 pm

Dresden doll, I agree with you that both liberals and conservatives want big government, just in different spheres. It is libertarians that want freedom.

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LawandOrder
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby LawandOrder » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:27 pm

Ah yes Liberals love to tout their diversity credentials and how accepting they are of everyone; Until someone comes in that is not equally accepting. :roll:

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dresden doll
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby dresden doll » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:35 pm

LawandOrder wrote:Ah yes Liberals love to tout their diversity credentials and how accepting they are of everyone; Until someone comes in that is not equally accepting. :roll:


Well, we tolerate everything except intolerance. Go figure how that works out, eh?

Jungleshark, I'm glad we agree. I'm willing to accept there's some hypocrisy involved in my side's viewpoints, so long as everyone else is equally self-aware.

alleycat3
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Re: Top conservative law schools

Postby alleycat3 » Mon Feb 02, 2009 3:47 pm

jungleshark wrote:I want to clarify something regarding the distinction between liberals, libertarians, and conservatives. Libertarianism is strictly a political ideology. Conservativism, on the other hand, may refer to political conservatism, or it might refer to cultural conservatism. I consider myself both libertarian and conservative, that is, culturally conservative. Politically, I am libertarian, but at the same time, I believe in traditional Christian values.


Did anyone else notice that this person has spent a whole lot of time "clarifying" things but has refused to address the half dozen or so times he's been called out for being homophobic and opposing legal rights for LGBTs?




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