What would you do in my shoes?

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Marmalade

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Re: What would you do in my shoes?

Postby Marmalade » Tue Dec 25, 2018 1:05 am

EnglandPrevails1 wrote:Thanks @Marmalade for your excellent response.

While I definitely want to get things moving, if my LSAT retake does not go well, I would definitely follow your advice. My plan for this summer, regardless of what happens, is to pass the "USPO bar" which would let me be a patent agent, and then I would look for a job, both to get experience and hopefully bank a little money before law school.

I appreciate your input and I'll update this thread based on what transpires.


Like QContinuum said above, passing the patent bar isn’t fully required for the job (you can be a patent scientist or technical advisor) but it can definitely make the job search easier. I took time to take the PLI course and pass the patent bar during my job search and it certainly helped, but I do know people who got patent scientist jobs without the bar passage. So I’d suggest doing the job search and study for the patent bar at the same time, don’t wait until you pass to start looking for a job.

I think you said you’re in New England/east coast? Boston has a large life sciences presence and a lot of BigLaw and boutiques that do life sciences IP.

In terms of patent bar courses if that’s a path you decide to take, you absolutely need to buy one, you will not be able to sit down with the MPEP and self study. PLI is the most expensive, but has probably the best passage rates. The patent laws changed significantly in 2013 (AIA) and the cheaper courses haven’t fully updated their materials and questions yet.

miskellyjohnson

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Re: What would you do in my shoes?

Postby miskellyjohnson » Tue Dec 25, 2018 2:18 pm

Posting from alt only because I lost access to previous account and it says email/username combo not recognized.

I am glad that after all that "spirited debate," there seems to be an agreement that the answer to the initial question of "Can I get a job in IP with my background from a non-T14 school?" is clearly: Yes, you can, as a patent prosecutor. Just like I said 20 posts ago. And that you should pursue tech spec positions, just like I said 20 posts ago.

Also, as you try to pass the USPTO bar, you should be applying for positions that don't require it. The best thing for you is to get a job as a technical specialist (sometimes called 'patent scientist' or other thing). Then the firm will pay for you to take a $2,000 PLI class and you will pass the bar after you start working.

Firms dont give much weight to simply passing the USPTO without having experience. The USPTO bar passage is more just a sign to the firm that you are sincerely interested in pursuing patent prosecution and are serious about a career in patents. If you have a compelling answer to the question of "Why patents?," and they believe you are really ready to transition your career, its almost as important as USPTO bar passage. Firms will not let you sign your own responses anyway (which is what bar passage allows) until you have substantial experience.

An example of this type of job for your background is here: http://jobs.jobvite.com/careers/gtlaw/j ... vsd=Indeed

I would honestly reccomend working with a legal recruiter, as a lot of recruiting for these types of positions is done off-market and it doesnt cost you anything, anyway (firm pays the recruiter, not you). PM me for suggestions if you want.

QContinuum

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Re: What would you do in my shoes?

Postby QContinuum » Tue Dec 25, 2018 9:30 pm

miskellyjohnson wrote:I am glad that after all that "spirited debate," there seems to be an agreement that the answer to the initial question of "Can I get a job in IP with my background from a non-T14 school?" is clearly: Yes, you can, as a patent prosecutor.

Key part bolded and underlined. We don't know whether OP wants to lock themselves into patent prosecution. Always better to keep more doors open than less.

miskellyjohnson wrote:I would honestly reccomend working with a legal recruiter, as a lot of recruiting for these types of positions is done off-market and it doesnt cost you anything, anyway (firm pays the recruiter, not you). PM me for suggestions if you want.

I disagree. Firms are unlikely to want to pay a recruiter fee to hire a novice tech spec.

miskellyjohnson

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Re: What would you do in my shoes?

Postby miskellyjohnson » Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:37 pm

QContinuum wrote:
miskellyjohnson wrote:I would honestly reccomend working with a legal recruiter, as a lot of recruiting for these types of positions is done off-market and it doesnt cost you anything, anyway (firm pays the recruiter, not you). PM me for suggestions if you want.

I disagree. Firms are unlikely to want to pay a recruiter fee to hire a novice tech spec.


Keep in mind recruiter fees are generally a percentage of salary, which for a novice tech spec are not that high, so the recruiting fee is not bad. I personally was hired (granted, many years ago) as a novice tech spec through a recruiter, and had several interviews and offers, so it didnt seem like, at least at that time, firms minded the fee. Could be different now.



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