UT, Michigan, Georgetown, W&M, Notre Dame, or Cornell

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fantastic
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:02 pm

Re: UT, Michigan, Georgetown, W&M, Notre Dame, or Cornell

Postby fantastic » Thu Jan 08, 2015 1:40 am

A. Nony Mouse wrote:FWIW, as a general rule, I don't think prosecutors' offices care very much about pedigree (though I'm sure you can find some individual exceptions). And even if they did, every single law school in the country is equipped to help you become a prosecutor, in that they all offer the same courses and generally the same internship/clinic/trial advocacy opportunities. There is nothing makes any one of the schools you've identified better than any of the others in actually preparing you to be a prosecutor (unless any one of them has a significantly lower cap on credits earned through externships, for instance, which might make it a little worse as an option). So there is no best school for how to become a prosecutor.

However, usually there are better schools and worse schools for any given individual - but better and worse are generally defined by placement power in a given region. If you know where you want to practice, then you're well-served to attend school in that region and intern with local prosecutors' offices throughout law school (not just during the summers). Like akili said, experience is what prosecutors' offices want to see, so generally they care more about what you do with your law school experience than where you attend. And making connections in the legal community you want to join is important.

If you have absolutely no preference about where you practice, you could just pick wherever sounds most pleasant, although keep in mind that most of these are fairly regional schools and so you will likely end up employed (if you do) in the region where the school is located (and even GT, Michigan, and Cornell are more likely to place you in their respective regions than somewhere across the country).

And as much as you don't want to talk about it, money is a huge factor because prosecutors don't make much of it, and so incurring significant debt, when all these schools will prepare you to be a prosecutor (to the extent any school does that) and pedigree isn't a big thing, doesn't make sense for your goals.


This is great info. Thank you. Will be ready to talk about money when I get more scholarship offers. The advice you gave is the kind of advice I was looking for.

BigZuck
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Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:53 am

Re: UT, Michigan, Georgetown, W&M, Notre Dame, or Cornell

Postby BigZuck » Thu Jan 08, 2015 2:57 am

It wasn't clear to me that the OP wanted to be a local prosecutor, for some reason I thought there were BIG FED dreams?

fantastic
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:02 pm

Re: UT, Michigan, Georgetown, W&M, Notre Dame, or Cornell

Postby fantastic » Thu Jan 08, 2015 10:02 am

BigZuck wrote:It wasn't clear to me that the OP wanted to be a local prosecutor, for some reason I thought there were BIG FED dreams?


I'm open to that as well!

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Lincoln
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Joined: Tue Nov 03, 2009 11:27 pm

Re: UT, Michigan, Georgetown, W&M, Notre Dame, or Cornell

Postby Lincoln » Thu Jan 08, 2015 10:41 am

A. Nony Mouse wrote:[T]here is no best school for how to become a prosecutor.


A. Nony Mouse wrote:If you know where you want to practice, then you're well-served to attend school in that region and intern with local prosecutors' offices throughout law school (not just during the summers).


A. Nony Mouse wrote:[I]ncurring significant debt . . . doesn't make sense for your goals.

fantastic
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:02 pm

Re: UT, Michigan, Georgetown, W&M, Notre Dame, or Cornell

Postby fantastic » Thu Jan 08, 2015 10:53 am

Thanks for the advice, everyone!




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