Schools that offer dual degree for JD and ms/phd in biology

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hirsch40p
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Joined: Tue Nov 18, 2014 12:21 pm

Schools that offer dual degree for JD and ms/phd in biology

Postby hirsch40p » Tue Jan 06, 2015 11:52 pm

Been trying to find schools that already have this program set up or will work with you to make one. If anyone knows of them please share. (I know a few already but just want to make sure I know all my options.) thanks!

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Nebby
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Re: Schools that offer dual degree for JD and ms/phd in biology

Postby Nebby » Wed Jan 07, 2015 12:06 am

Y? R u maid of money?

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RZ5646
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Joined: Fri May 30, 2014 1:31 pm

Re: Schools that offer dual degree for JD and ms/phd in biology

Postby RZ5646 » Wed Jan 07, 2015 12:17 am

From what I understand, bio is the least valuable STEM PhD you can get. Schools admit droves of students to use as cheap labor in labs, and then they can't get jobs. It also takes forever, so any student loans you have would balloon.

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Attax
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Re: Schools that offer dual degree for JD and ms/phd in biology

Postby Attax » Wed Jan 07, 2015 3:40 pm

Just go get the PhD

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antiworldly
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Re: Schools that offer dual degree for JD and ms/phd in biology

Postby antiworldly » Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:38 pm

There really aren't any, unfortunately. If you're looking to do IP, according to everyone I've talked to in the field the Ph. D. is a huge benefit, but you'll have to get it first then go to law school afterwards. Bio Ph. D.s are just about 7 years, so you'd be in for the long haul. The good news about getting a Ph. D. is that they'll pay you to get it, and depending on the school it isn't terribly bad pay. However, if you're signing up for it just to get those three letters, don't. It is an incredibly long and grueling trek that is only worth it if you absolutely love research and being the world expert on one small area almost nobody else will care about. I've loved my experience as a doctoral student and wouldn't trade it for the world, but it is definitely not for everyone.

Just an aside about how masters and Ph. D.s work in the hard sciences in the US from my personal experience: if you're going for your Ph. D., especially at a higher tier school, you probably won't have a masters. You'll be awarded your masters two years in as a kind of 'attaboy' and a convenient checkpoint where they can kick out underperforming students. The other way to get a masters is at a lower tier school in a program aimed at getting it for career advancement for teachers. Therefore, at least in chemistry, a masters is seen as someone who couldn't really cut it, and seen as a downside by other chemists.




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