Texas v NU

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cotiger
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Re: Texas v NU

Postby cotiger » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:17 am

BVest wrote:
cotiger wrote:
BVest wrote:I'm not entirely sure you can simply add the clerkship score to the biglaw score. I think clerkships often get double-counted where the attorney has a clerkship and a standing post-clerkship offer. For example, look at Yale. They have an employment score of 82%. But if you add their clerkships, biglaw, public service, and school funded, which is not even all of the sectors their graduates will be going into, those numbers add up to 88%. Maybe I'm misreading it though.


School-funded is not a separate category. It's almost exclusively PI.


Yeah, I wasn't sure if that might be an issue (PI overlap) or if maybe some school funded didn't count towards the JD required/advantage score. Either way I looked for information on the scoring of clerkships on the site and didn't find anything definitive either way.


Clerkships aren't double counted with anything. All grads are put into only one of the employment categories in the information that is reported to the ABA 9 months out. Some school-funded are ST/PT/non-BPR, but if you're getting this from LST, then that's the difference between the "School-funded rate" listing and the % that is indicated with the red asterisk.

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WokeUpInACar
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Re: Texas v NU

Postby WokeUpInACar » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:24 am

I mean, even if it is 2x chance, say 30% v. 60%, you're still wayyyyyy better off at UT for 70% of the outcomes.

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shifty_eyed
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Re: Texas v NU

Postby shifty_eyed » Mon Jan 27, 2014 12:54 pm

My thinking (I chose UT with instate + $$ over NU w/ 45k) was that I don't want to be in a position where I not only need to get big law but also need to KEEP it for about 5 years or more to pay off my loans. I also think recovering from a no-offer* or striking out at OCI would be a lot easier at UT where it's possible to network/hustle/etc in Austin (and even Dallas and Houston) during 2L/3L.

*besides the big 3, most of the TX firms seem to have ~75% or lower offer rates

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Attax
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Re: Texas v NU

Postby Attax » Mon Jan 27, 2014 12:59 pm

shifty_eyed wrote:My thinking (I chose UT with instate + $$ over NU w/ 45k) was that I don't want to be in a position where I not only need to get big law but also need to KEEP it for about 5 years or more to pay off my loans. I also think recovering from a no-offer* or striking out at OCI would be a lot easier at UT where it's possible to network/hustle/etc in Austin (and even Dallas and Houston) during 2L/3L.

*besides the big 3, most of the TX firms seem to have ~75% or lower offer rates


This has been my thinking: NU I'd need Biglaw, Texas I can go and land midlaw/small-town law and probably be in a decent situation. Even though I want Biglaw, it is better to keep it a want than a need.

*besides the big 3, most of the TX firms seem to have ~75% or lower offer rates


Could you explain what you mean by this? Other than the big 3 firms here in TX most offer full time positions to about 75% of all summer associates? Where can I see this info, if you don't mind linking.

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ScottRiqui
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Re: Texas v NU

Postby ScottRiqui » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:15 pm

Attax wrote:
*besides the big 3, most of the TX firms seem to have ~75% or lower offer rates


Could you explain what you mean by this? Other than the big 3 firms here in TX most offer full time positions to about 75% of all summer associates? Where can I see this info, if you don't mind linking.


I'm curious about this too. And if it's true, does doing the typical Texas "split summer" arrangement help offset that somewhat? If you have two 75% shots, your odds of making at least one of them should be around 95%.

Of course, I realize that the two halves of the summer aren't completely independent variables, and that a flaw in your personality or in the quality of your work that would get you no-offered during the first half could also get you no-offered for the second half. But in general, wouldn't splitting your 2L summer give you a little bit of a safety net since you're not putting all your eggs in one basket?

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shifty_eyed
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Re: Texas v NU

Postby shifty_eyed » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:15 pm

I may be overly pessimistic about offer rates, but you can find them on the hiring grid section + Additional Hiring Questions on the NALP directory.

They are not always up to date. For example, I know that Jackson Walker did not offer at least 2 of its summer associates in 2013.

https://www.nalpdirectory.com/employer_ ... lker%22%7D

"Fit" seems very important for Texas firms.




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