most liberal/conservative law schools

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18488
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most liberal/conservative law schools

Postby 18488 » Mon Nov 27, 2006 11:06 pm

So apparently students at Vanderbilt and George Mason have a rep for being very conservative, while those at Boalt, Vermont, and NYU have a more liberal reputation. What do you guys know about the political reputation of other good schools? I don't think I could attend a school with an ultra-conservative population, so this is a selection criterion. Thanks.

kmoneys
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Postby kmoneys » Tue Nov 28, 2006 12:40 am

uchicago is known for its "conservative" approach to law... i.e. a very textual, literal interpretation of the constitution and laws, etc. but i'm not sure how that translates into political leanings for the student body.

so, i guess what i'm saying is that you might also want to consider the legal "leanings" of the school as well, since political leanings arguably translate into certain types of legal interpretations/understandings.

doesn't really answer your question, but is something tangential to your inquiry.

LT_Eagels
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Postby LT_Eagels » Tue Dec 05, 2006 10:57 pm

Private schools in the South such as Vanderbilt, Duke, and Emory tend to be conservative. UNC Chapel Hill is the odd ball, they tend to be very liberal. If you're concerned about a school being too conservative, then I would highly advise you to stay away from the South.

kmoneys
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Postby kmoneys » Tue Dec 05, 2006 11:09 pm

I would highly advise you to stay away from the South.


This is not entirely true. For example, UT Austin is liberal. And I really wouldn't call Duke all that conservative. If you're concerned about the political leanings on a campus, I would suggest visiting before making assumptions based on geographic location.

jeff2486
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Postby jeff2486 » Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:27 am

This is not entirely true. For example, UT Austin is liberal.


Texas may be located in the southern half of the United States geographically but it is not "The South."

The South: VA, NC, SC, GA, MS, TN, AL, LA.
Last edited by jeff2486 on Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

Yohannes
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Postby Yohannes » Wed Dec 06, 2006 5:43 pm

and let's also add that while Virginia is in "The South", we stood up big time this past November!

kmoneys
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Postby kmoneys » Wed Dec 06, 2006 5:49 pm

Texas may be located in the southern half of the United States geographically but it is not "The South."


hey, we were part of the confederacy. we did the whole seceding thing. we did our part in the whole "war of northern aggression." ;-)

JohnnyD
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Postby JohnnyD » Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:07 pm

let us not forget the katrina ravaged mississippi so soon, please

adastra
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Postby adastra » Tue Dec 12, 2006 1:24 pm

I think that U of C's reputation for conservatism comes more from its famously libertarian economics professors and historical racial politics than from its approach to law school education. I mean, its educational approach certainly may contribute to the perception of conservatism, but here in Chicago most people think of the whole school as a fairly conservative institution.

I have a feeling that, other than famous oddballs like U of C, the political leanings of law schools will match up closely to the attitude of their surroundings. So Northeastern or urban West Coast schools will mostly lean left and Southern schools will mostly lean right. UT isn't really an exception because Austin itself is pretty liberal. But I mean, if it's a good law school it will probably have space for many different political views. After all, isn't having your assumptions and pre-existing notions challenged part of the whole reason for going?

britt2010
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Postby britt2010 » Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:13 am

Jeff DID add Mississippi, he just used Michigan's MI instead of Mississippi's MS. :)

jeff2486
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Postby jeff2486 » Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:47 am

Whoa real smart jeff...better edit it and then pretend like brittlynn's post was a complete lie.

jeff2486
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Postby jeff2486 » Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:47 am

You mean you wouldn't consider Michigan the south?

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letylyf
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Postby letylyf » Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:57 am

I would. Just like Florida is kinda in the northwest!

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Dschinghis Khan
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Postby Dschinghis Khan » Fri Dec 15, 2006 2:43 am

Hey guys,

This is my first post here, so be gentle, but I have a slightly related question:

What is the relative incidence of student activism on campus at these places? I.e., if I go there, how many times will I have my day interrupted by loud political rallies/protests, what will be the risk that if I attend a lecture by a controversial speaker, he'll get booed or dragged off the stage by activists, etc.

I prefer to talk about (and hear others talk about) politics while sitting in an armchair rather than "on the street", so that kind of stuff is a major turn-off for me. I'm an undergraduate at the University of Chicago right now, and we don't get much of it 'round these parts; the only thing to spark a massive on-campus protest in the time I've been here is when they changed the undergraduate application. But I hear that at other schools, particularly on the East Coast, that kind of stuff happens all the time.

Is that true? If so, where, and how frequently?

Thanks.

neverborn
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Postby neverborn » Sun Jan 07, 2007 6:32 am

Now, Dchinghis, there was that STAND rally that got rained on....

lindenksv
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Postby lindenksv » Sun Jan 07, 2007 4:13 pm

I don't know about Vanderbilt, but I do know quite a few law students at George Mason. I think it's student body is probably a little bit more conservative than say GW or Georgetown, but I have heard of no instances of complaint or high political activism there. Though technically in VA, in DC, we think of it as a DC school and I don't think you could call any school in DC conservative (I go to Gtown), but we're not anywhere near as liberal as CA. Politically speaking, I think you wouldn't be unhappy here.

GOP08
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Postby GOP08 » Mon Jan 08, 2007 7:38 pm

As a liberal shouldn't you have an open mind? Are you afraid that a few conservative students will make you pee your pants and then you might forget who you are? Don't worry we aren't going to scare you into voting for the Gingrich/Rice ticket in '08. You will be able to vote for the sad ticket of Rhodam-Clinton/Obama. But after being around people with common sense for a little bit you may just vote for the GOP.

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jonas
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Postby jonas » Mon Jan 08, 2007 7:43 pm

GOP08: What a charming way to join the conversation. It's your first post on this forum, and you're already picking a fight. Amazing.

Are you still upset about November? Is that why you're acting like a jerk?
Last edited by jonas on Mon Jan 08, 2007 7:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

skip
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Postby skip » Mon Jan 08, 2007 10:32 pm

That being said, here is my prayer:

Dear Sweet Liberal Ten Pound Baby Jebus, no Hillary.

Pretty please.


I laughed. Hard.

EmoryLaw2010
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Postby EmoryLaw2010 » Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:04 am

sorry for the bump, but I just wanted to point out that the person who called Emory a conservative school better do their research. I came from a Northeastern college, and expected it to be more conservative here, but it is easily 5 steps further to the left.

Emory is in the south, but Atlanta is a big city with a lot of liberals, and it flows over into the university.

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indiana_student
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Postby indiana_student » Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:15 am

Emory, I am not doubting you but if that is the case, why are there so few minorities at Emory? According to LSN they throw thousands at anyone who isn't white in an attempt to get them to attend.

Most conservative universities (according to Princeton Review)

1. Regent
2. Ave Maria
3. BYU
4. George Mason
5. Notre Dame
6. LSU
7. Alabama
8. Campbell
9. Texas Tech
10.Mississippi

Most liberal universities:

1. DC
2. Northeastern
3. City College of NY - Queens
4. Lewis & Clark
5. American
6. Vermont
7. Oregon
8. Berkeley
9. NYU
10.Maine

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thisabyssisbliss
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Postby thisabyssisbliss » Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:37 am

Neo Cons trace their roots to U Chicago

although this is probably unfair to Leo Strauss

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Dadric
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Postby Dadric » Tue Nov 20, 2007 11:21 am

Emory, I am not doubting you but if that is the case, why are there so few minorities at Emory?


Clearly, race = ideology. Sorry, this just seemed like a ridiculous thing to say.

JSandlin
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Postby JSandlin » Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:05 pm

I think generally if it is harder to get in, the students will more likely be liberal in any given geographical area... :mrgreen:

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Pathfinder
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Postby Pathfinder » Tue Nov 20, 2007 1:12 pm

is there an ideological difference between NYU and Columbia. I've heard both are liberal, but is columbia more moderate?




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