"Regional law schools and what that means"

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JDanger007
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Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:41 pm

"Regional law schools and what that means"

Postby JDanger007 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 8:10 pm

If a thread like this exists I am sorry, but was hoping for a clarification. So say you have X school that is regional with a strong reputation, but most of its ties are to that area. Where I want to work is a few hours away, yet this is the best school I can get in. Does it mean that I will be completely tied down to that area since most of the firms i will get to know, faculty, etc are from that area. How restricted will i be by going to this school, in general. Again its not a Harvard or Yale with a reputation that spans the country.
Thanks, sorry for the vagueness.

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buddyt
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Re: "Regional law schools and what that means"

Postby buddyt » Tue Apr 09, 2013 8:52 pm

jp238607 wrote:If a thread like this exists I am sorry, but was hoping for a clarification. So say you have X school that is regional with a strong reputation, but most of its ties are to that area. Where I want to work is a few hours away, yet this is the best school I can get in. Does it mean that I will be completely tied down to that area since most of the firms i will get to know, faculty, etc are from that area. How restricted will i be by going to this school, in general. Again its not a Harvard or Yale with a reputation that spans the country.
Thanks, sorry for the vagueness.

Need more details (i.e. school names) to be able to give advice. If you are considering McGeorge but want to work in LA that's a horrible idea, but going to University of Arizona planning to work in Phoenix is just fine.

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nickb285
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Re: "Regional law schools and what that means"

Postby nickb285 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 8:54 pm

It depends on the region and the school. Generally speaking, the closer to the school, the better your odds, but stronger regionals (as a rule, those in regions that don't have a more prestigious school nearby) can extend to nearby states. So if you want to work in the south, Vanderbilt will get you just about anywhere, Kentucky will get you anywhere in Kentucky, Emory will place well in GA but probably has some portability to South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, etc. though not as much as Vandy or Duke.

JDanger007
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Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:41 pm

Re: "Regional law schools and what that means"

Postby JDanger007 » Wed Apr 10, 2013 1:38 pm

That makes a lot of sense. I got a very good deal for university of Baltimore but am from Philadelphia area. Ub has so many ties to Maryland as most of the state judges went there. Job prospects are much better there and I know I would get something even at a lower school. If I am not going big law and just hope to get hired up in Philly/ south jersey etc. regardless of it being a lower school , considering I do well is it too big of a market stretch ?
Thanks!

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nickb285
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Re: "Regional law schools and what that means"

Postby nickb285 » Wed Apr 10, 2013 2:00 pm

The east coast, unfortunately, has much smaller "subregions" because it's so crowded there. So you've got the DC market, the Philly market, the NYC market, which are all going to be made up of 1. Students from T14s and 2. students from local schools, generally in smaller amounts and in smaller firms. Take a look here for instance: http://www.lstscorereports.com/?school= ... b=location

Of the people who graduated from UB last year, they know where 85% of them are--and only 5.5% are anywhere outside of the Maryland/DC/VA markets.




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