Stanford vs. Berkeley

(Rankings, Profiles, Tuition, Student Life, . . . )

How much more are you willing to pay?

$50,000
47
65%
$40,000
5
7%
$30,000
10
14%
$20,000
6
8%
$10,000
4
6%
 
Total votes: 72

User avatar
guano
Posts: 2268
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 9:49 am

Re: Stanford vs. Berkeley

Postby guano » Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:17 am

What a load of crap in this thread

thand42292
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2012 3:30 pm

Re: Stanford vs. Berkeley

Postby thand42292 » Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:54 am

pedestrian wrote:
Ling520 wrote:
thand42292 wrote:
unc0mm0n1 wrote:It depends on how much money you make as a circus clown. Let me give you a scenerio. You go to Yale at sticker, coming out with about 230k in loans. Coap works on a ten year plan thus they would pay up to 25k in years 1-5 and 42K yr 6-10.

Let's say you decide screw law I want to teach kids and become a teacher in New York. The starting salary is 50k, Your spouse is a policy analyst for NYC and makes about 100k. So combined your income is 150k after taxes (using standard deduction), SS, etc., it's about 104k. Now if I'm reading this right COAP is taken from your before tax salary which is 50K plus your spouses salary minus the first 40K. So your COAP eligible income is 110K. The rate would be 6750 plus 60% of money over 80K. Which mean you would contribute 24750 and COAP would pay 50 bucks. so instead of taking home 104k a year you're taking home 79k a year. Even with Coap you can get screwed. I know most 0L's don't look at this stuff as real money but it is. Paying that type of money for 10 years is crazy to me. Once again maybe I'm too risk adverse but I'd rather be debt free and go to a school like NYU than pay sticker at Yale.


What are you talking about? I know tons of people who work white collar jobs for NYC. Not one started off making 100k. That's a mid-career salary after years of raises in local government usually. What job is this? If the persons around entry level like you they should be making significantly less. If the person's not around entry level and is your goddamn spouse they should be able to help you with your loans anyway. Like you say NYs not that expensive if your willing to live out. If your taking home 79k a year as a couple in your 20s or 30s, as most people on this board are, and are working teachers hours you should have no problem living on the cheap in the outer boroughs. This is a shitty anecdote. Which just shows its goddamn hard to thing of a scenario where Yale's the wrong answer.

Disclaimer: Didn't even apply. Just a 0l with some NYC experience and a deep desire to call bullshit.


Looks like your having reading comprehension difficulty; he never claimed that 100K was starting salary in NYC. Also, keep in mind that the people you know are not representative of the people unc0mm0n1 knows or anyone else knows, for that matter—e.g., for many of the people I know, mostly former military working in policy or the defense sector, six figure salaries are the norm at early/mid-career.


The "risk" in the scenario is that you will decide, immediately after graduating, that you don't want a legal degree after all AND you also have a spouse who can just barely afford to pay for it, so you are stuck paying for a useless degree.

I think that is an extreme and unlikely scenario, but going to ANY law school in that scenario is a bad decision, even if you are going for free. The way to avoid that outcome is not to get a full ride at a lower ranked school, it is to make sure that you want a legal career before you go to law school.

The real risk of taking out loans for law school is usually that you will be unable, through no fault of your own, to get the legal work that you want, but will still be forced to pay back the debt. That risk diminishes to essentially zero at the very top schools with generous LRAPs.



Look I don't know everything and I've asked others questions about law school on this forum via thread or PM many times. I do cosign what pedestrian said.

Additionally, I'm familiar with a lot of NYC starting government salaries-it takes a while in most positions to get up that high. So it's kind of a stupid scenario. If you can find me a starting salary that high that doesn't require additional experience let me know, I want to apply. If you have a spouse who's been working long enough and you met them before law school in New Haven you probably had the option of living together and commuting to save money and they should know what they're getting into with your debt. If you met them at Yale my understanding is their debt will come into play too. And worst case scenario you'd be pulling 70ishK and be able to live in the outer boroughs on the cheap with something to spare. This is true even with kids in most of Queens/Brooklyn and the burbs.

Compare this outcome to somebody who misses big law on a half or 3/4 scholarship at a lower T14. It's objectively better. If anyone thinks I'm wrong I'm open to correction but uncommon appears to be screwing around. Again I applied to S and H not Y and H WL'd me so absolutely no dog in this fight except to say that uncommon is making no bloody sense.

User avatar
unc0mm0n1
Posts: 1714
Joined: Sat Dec 25, 2010 1:06 pm

Re: Stanford vs. Berkeley

Postby unc0mm0n1 » Sat Mar 09, 2013 12:03 pm

thand42292 wrote:Look I don't know everything and I've asked others questions about law school on this forum via thread or PM many times. I do cosign what pedestrian said.

Additionally, I'm familiar with a lot of NYC starting government salaries-it takes a while in most positions to get up that high. So it's kind of a stupid scenario. If you can find me a starting salary that high that doesn't require additional experience let me know, I want to apply. If you have a spouse who's been working long enough and you met them before law school in New Haven you probably had the option of living together and commuting to save money and they should know what they're getting into with your debt. If you met them at Yale my understanding is their debt will come into play too. And worst case scenario you'd be pulling 70ishK and be able to live in the outer boroughs on the cheap with something to spare. This is true even with kids in most of Queens/Brooklyn and the burbs.

Compare this outcome to somebody who misses big law on a half or 3/4 scholarship at a lower T14. It's objectively better. If anyone thinks I'm wrong I'm open to correction but uncommon appears to be screwing around. Again I applied to S and H not Y and H WL'd me so absolutely no dog in this fight except to say that uncommon is making no bloody sense.


I can see why you got waitlisted, you need to work on your reading comprehension. When did I say starting salary? But for your info I have a couple of friends who make that type of money in much lower COL areas than NYC straight out of the military. The reason you have a hard time finding those jobs is because you aren't qualified for them. When did I say you met them in New Haven or shared living expenses? It's like you just made an entire situation up instead of taking the hypo at face value. Also when did I say the situation was likely? Read the rest of the thread before you make stupid comments. A guy from YLS said if he became a rodeo clown (very unlikely) he wouldn't have to pay back his loans ever. I gave a scenerio where that was untrue. He understood that my scenerio was valid and we joked about it, end of story. Then you and a few others people began to put other things into the scenerio like "You don't start out making 100K in policy work" (which I never said) or "getting a half scholarship at a lower T14 school is a better choice than Yale" (which is stupid and I never said).

Lastly, your stupid remark that "hey you can just live in queens for ten years" is beyond dumb. You can also live in the projects to save money but would you want to? Would you want to pay almost a quarter million dollars of your income over the next ten years when that money could be used in so many other ways. If you invested that same money over those ten years at retirement you're looking at well over a million dollars. The point is, Yale like all other law schools has risks. Clearly the risks are less than other places but they are still there and even though you, like most 0L like to bury your head in the sand to those risks, they are still real and valid. That's why people choosing law schools should never take advice from 0L's. I know people at H right now that are in trouble. A couple got no offered by their summer firms, some haven't secured fellowships yet. It happens, while most likely they'll land on their feet it's not guaranteed. Protip for your law school exams: Answer/respond to the question asked not the one you think was asked. Things will make a lot more "bloody sense" then.




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