Northeastern v. Georgia State

(Rankings, Profiles, Tuition, Student Life, . . . )

Northeastern or GA State?

Northeastern
7
23%
Georgia State
24
77%
 
Total votes: 31

chelle26
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:32 pm

Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby chelle26 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 7:51 pm

I am terribly torn between Northeastern and GA State. Please help me!

About me:
I have no idea what kind of law I want to practice. I am most interested in international law, but I want to have a wide array of options. I want to live in a big city. I like Atlanta okay, but I'd prefer to move outside of Georgia. However, I'm attracted to Atlanta because of GA State Law's great reputation and Atlanta's booming job market.

GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST), but 83.9% work in GA.
In-state tuition and fees approx. $15,000 per year.
Medium-low cost of living (would incl. cost of maintaining my car + approx. $700 per mo. for rent and utilities)

Northeastern:
Only interested because of its co-op program, which allows me to travel and IDEALLY find a job in another state and or country.
Greatly decreased job prospects (48.9% score on LST), but only 53.8% are employment in MA and 3 people got jobs in another country.
Got the 90k scholarship, which brings tuition and fees to approx. $14,000 per year.
High cost of living (incl. public transport and plane ticket cost + approx. $1000 per mo. for rent and utilities)

My other concern is whether I can transfer to GA State from Northeastern (after the first year if I so desire) despite the fact that they don't give out traditional grades - does anyone know the answer to that? I plan to call the schools and try to figure it out but I feel weird asking them about transferring when I'm a potential student.

User avatar
052220151
Posts: 2421
Joined: Fri Jun 08, 2012 4:58 am

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby 052220151 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 8:23 pm

Of these two, go to Georgia State. Also, international law isn't really a thing.

Also, retake.

User avatar
Richie Tenenbaum
Posts: 2162
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 6:17 am

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby Richie Tenenbaum » Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:05 pm

chelle26 wrote:I am terribly torn between Northeastern and GA State. Please help me!

About me:
I have no idea what kind of law I want to practice. I am most interested in international law, but I want to have a wide array of options. I want to live in a big city. I like Atlanta okay, but I'd prefer to move outside of Georgia. However, I'm attracted to Atlanta because of GA State Law's great reputation and Atlanta's booming job market.

GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST), but 83.9% work in GA.
In-state tuition and fees approx. $15,000 per year.
Medium-low cost of living (would incl. cost of maintaining my car + approx. $700 per mo. for rent and utilities)

Northeastern:
Only interested because of its co-op program, which allows me to travel and IDEALLY find a job in another state and or country.
Greatly decreased job prospects (48.9% score on LST), but only 53.8% are employment in MA and 3 people got jobs in another country.
Got the 90k scholarship, which brings tuition and fees to approx. $14,000 per year.
High cost of living (incl. public transport and plane ticket cost + approx. $1000 per mo. for rent and utilities)

My other concern is whether I can transfer to GA State from Northeastern (after the first year if I so desire) despite the fact that they don't give out traditional grades - does anyone know the answer to that? I plan to call the schools and try to figure it out but I feel weird asking them about transferring when I'm a potential student.


1) When you say "international law" what do you mean?
2) Going to law school in the U.S. with the goal of getting a legal job overseas is probably a bad idea.
3) Going to Northeastern with the goal of getting a legal job in a different state is most definitely a bad idea.
4) I've only read the description on Northeastern's website, but their co-op program does not seem that special. First off, everyone is trying to do legal work during the summers. That's not special. Plus, Northeastern having classes in part of the summer time might be a headache and potentially limit some of the stuff you can do in the summer. Secondly, internships during the school year are fairly common. That's part of the reason why it's a good idea to go to a school in an area you want to work. (As an aside, big law firms are not going to take on fall or spring clerks--they have summer programs. Best case scenario is a firm might let you work there during the school year as a 3L after you've already accepted an offer after doing your 2L summer there.)
5) Neither school has very strong placement, especially into the jobs that will hope you pay off your debt after law school. Have you considered retaking? Just a few points can mean a ton more money in scholarships or schools with stronger placement.

chelle26
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:32 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby chelle26 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:22 pm

Richie Tenenbaum wrote:
chelle26 wrote:I am terribly torn between Northeastern and GA State. Please help me!

About me:
I have no idea what kind of law I want to practice. I am most interested in international law, but I want to have a wide array of options. I want to live in a big city. I like Atlanta okay, but I'd prefer to move outside of Georgia. However, I'm attracted to Atlanta because of GA State Law's great reputation and Atlanta's booming job market.

GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST), but 83.9% work in GA.
In-state tuition and fees approx. $15,000 per year.
Medium-low cost of living (would incl. cost of maintaining my car + approx. $700 per mo. for rent and utilities)

Northeastern:
Only interested because of its co-op program, which allows me to travel and IDEALLY find a job in another state and or country.
Greatly decreased job prospects (48.9% score on LST), but only 53.8% are employment in MA and 3 people got jobs in another country.
Got the 90k scholarship, which brings tuition and fees to approx. $14,000 per year.
High cost of living (incl. public transport and plane ticket cost + approx. $1000 per mo. for rent and utilities)

My other concern is whether I can transfer to GA State from Northeastern (after the first year if I so desire) despite the fact that they don't give out traditional grades - does anyone know the answer to that? I plan to call the schools and try to figure it out but I feel weird asking them about transferring when I'm a potential student.


1) When you say "international law" what do you mean?
2) Going to law school in the U.S. with the goal of getting a legal job overseas is probably a bad idea.
3) Going to Northeastern with the goal of getting a legal job in a different state is most definitely a bad idea.
4) I've only read the description on Northeastern's website, but their co-op program does not seem that special. First off, everyone is trying to do legal work during the summers. That's not special. Plus, Northeastern having classes in part of the summer time might be a headache and potentially limit some of the stuff you can do in the summer. Secondly, internships during the school year are fairly common. That's part of the reason why it's a good idea to go to a school in an area you want to work. (As an aside, big law firms are not going to take on fall or spring clerks--they have summer programs. Best case scenario is a firm might let you work there during the school year as a 3L after you've already accepted an offer after doing your 2L summer there.)
5) Neither school has very strong placement, especially into the jobs that will hope you pay off your debt after law school. Have you considered retaking? Just a few points can mean a ton more money in scholarships or schools with stronger placement.


1. I don't really know what I mean - I'm a total novice when it comes to law. Ideally, working abroad - though I know that's unlikely.
2. Realistically, I know this but cannot afford other options. Honestly, I'll figure out getting overseas later. Right now I just want to go to a school that secures me a job.
3. Why? I had imagined that I could concentrate their four co-op semesters in one area and increase my chances of getting hired there.
4. Something to think about. Though, it's not that I wouldn't want to work in MA, I just realize that the job market is flooded and Northeastern students aren't at the top. So I thought I might have better chances elsewhere.
5. I have enough money saved to pay for these schools, so debt isn't an issue. I am concerned about comparative costs though, of course.

User avatar
Richie Tenenbaum
Posts: 2162
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 6:17 am

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby Richie Tenenbaum » Sun Jan 20, 2013 2:37 am

chelle26 wrote:
Richie Tenenbaum wrote:
chelle26 wrote:I am terribly torn between Northeastern and GA State. Please help me!

About me:
I have no idea what kind of law I want to practice. I am most interested in international law, but I want to have a wide array of options. I want to live in a big city. I like Atlanta okay, but I'd prefer to move outside of Georgia. However, I'm attracted to Atlanta because of GA State Law's great reputation and Atlanta's booming job market.

GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST), but 83.9% work in GA.
In-state tuition and fees approx. $15,000 per year.
Medium-low cost of living (would incl. cost of maintaining my car + approx. $700 per mo. for rent and utilities)

Northeastern:
Only interested because of its co-op program, which allows me to travel and IDEALLY find a job in another state and or country.
Greatly decreased job prospects (48.9% score on LST), but only 53.8% are employment in MA and 3 people got jobs in another country.
Got the 90k scholarship, which brings tuition and fees to approx. $14,000 per year.
High cost of living (incl. public transport and plane ticket cost + approx. $1000 per mo. for rent and utilities)

My other concern is whether I can transfer to GA State from Northeastern (after the first year if I so desire) despite the fact that they don't give out traditional grades - does anyone know the answer to that? I plan to call the schools and try to figure it out but I feel weird asking them about transferring when I'm a potential student.


1) When you say "international law" what do you mean?
2) Going to law school in the U.S. with the goal of getting a legal job overseas is probably a bad idea.
3) Going to Northeastern with the goal of getting a legal job in a different state is most definitely a bad idea.
4) I've only read the description on Northeastern's website, but their co-op program does not seem that special. First off, everyone is trying to do legal work during the summers. That's not special. Plus, Northeastern having classes in part of the summer time might be a headache and potentially limit some of the stuff you can do in the summer. Secondly, internships during the school year are fairly common. That's part of the reason why it's a good idea to go to a school in an area you want to work. (As an aside, big law firms are not going to take on fall or spring clerks--they have summer programs. Best case scenario is a firm might let you work there during the school year as a 3L after you've already accepted an offer after doing your 2L summer there.)
5) Neither school has very strong placement, especially into the jobs that will hope you pay off your debt after law school. Have you considered retaking? Just a few points can mean a ton more money in scholarships or schools with stronger placement.


1. I don't really know what I mean - I'm a total novice when it comes to law. Ideally, working abroad - though I know that's unlikely.
2. Realistically, I know this but cannot afford other options. Honestly, I'll figure out getting overseas later. Right now I just want to go to a school that secures me a job.
3. Why? I had imagined that I could concentrate their four co-op semesters in one area and increase my chances of getting hired there.
4. Something to think about. Though, it's not that I wouldn't want to work in MA, I just realize that the job market is flooded and Northeastern students aren't at the top. So I thought I might have better chances elsewhere.
5. I have enough money saved to pay for these schools, so debt isn't an issue. I am concerned about comparative costs though, of course.


Based on your responses, I wouldn't tell people you're interested in international law. International law is a popular term to use, but it doesn't really exist, as least in terms of what people imagine. (There is a very narrow area for people interested in international human rights type stuff, but there are very, very few jobs in that area. There is also transactional work (and international arbitration work) that happens at big law firms, but that isn't a very realistic goal either for most law students.)

You need to concrete on 1) getting more specific about why law school and 2) choosing schools that maximize your chance at getting a legal job.

As for the co-op program: The only potential benefit I see from this is that it would allow 2Ls that strike out at OCI and 3Ls with no job lined up to work at small firms in different cities. The thing is though, that many small firms don't give job offers based off internships. I'm just not too sure about how this program is that helpful. Maybe a northeastern student can talk about the program more.

Cellar-door
Posts: 370
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 4:33 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby Cellar-door » Sun Jan 20, 2013 1:35 pm

chelle26 wrote:I am terribly torn between Northeastern and GA State. Please help me!

About me:
I have no idea what kind of law I want to practice. I am most interested in international law, but I want to have a wide array of options. I want to live in a big city. I like Atlanta okay, but I'd prefer to move outside of Georgia. However, I'm attracted to Atlanta because of GA State Law's great reputation and Atlanta's booming job market.

GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST), but 83.9% work in GA.
In-state tuition and fees approx. $15,000 per year.
Medium-low cost of living (would incl. cost of maintaining my car + approx. $700 per mo. for rent and utilities)

Northeastern:
Only interested because of its co-op program, which allows me to travel and IDEALLY find a job in another state and or country.
Greatly decreased job prospects (48.9% score on LST), but only 53.8% are employment in MA and 3 people got jobs in another country.
Got the 90k scholarship, which brings tuition and fees to approx. $14,000 per year.
High cost of living (incl. public transport and plane ticket cost + approx. $1000 per mo. for rent and utilities)

My other concern is whether I can transfer to GA State from Northeastern (after the first year if I so desire) despite the fact that they don't give out traditional grades - does anyone know the answer to that? I plan to call the schools and try to figure it out but I feel weird asking them about transferring when I'm a potential student.


Ok so as many people have mentioned International law is a tiny hyper-competitive segment that it is unlikely either of these schools will get you into (yes I know NE has the kid in their promotional package who got a co-op then a job at the Hague, but it is incredibly rare).
Basically these two schools will get you jobs where they are, so make the decision based on where you would prefer to live, if you want Boston pick NE if you want Atlanta pick GS. Boston will be slightly more expensive to live in, (probably more like $150-$200 a month than the $300 you are assuming) but it isn't enough of a difference to matter.

User avatar
ndirish2010
Posts: 2950
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 4:41 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby ndirish2010 » Sun Jan 20, 2013 2:02 pm

Don't go to either (maybe Georgia State w/ a full ride).

PRgradBYU
Posts: 1419
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:04 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby PRgradBYU » Sun Jan 20, 2013 7:38 pm

chelle26 wrote:GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST)


LOL

Edit: Quoting fail
Last edited by PRgradBYU on Sun Jan 20, 2013 11:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
ndirish2010
Posts: 2950
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 4:41 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby ndirish2010 » Sun Jan 20, 2013 7:53 pm

PRgradBYU wrote:
ndirish2010 wrote:GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST)


LOL


Woah, I did not say that haha.

User avatar
dr123
Posts: 3503
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:38 am

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby dr123 » Sun Jan 20, 2013 7:54 pm

64.5% is fantastic? Teh fuck?

PRgradBYU
Posts: 1419
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:04 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby PRgradBYU » Mon Jan 21, 2013 12:01 am

ndirish2010 wrote:
PRgradBYU wrote:
ndirish2010 wrote:GA State Law:
Fantastic employment rate (64.5% score on LST)


LOL


Woah, I did not say that haha.


My bad, ndirish2010. I've had a lot of quoting fails lately, haha.

User avatar
BruceWayne
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby BruceWayne » Mon Jan 21, 2013 12:37 am

Sorry to be a jackass but regardless of what you choose, don't go to Ga State because of the "booming" job market. The only thing "booming" in the Atlanta job market is the sound of all the 2L resumes hitting the floor because they don't meet the firms cut off.

20141023
Posts: 3072
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2012 12:17 am

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby 20141023 » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:13 am

.
Last edited by 20141023 on Mon Feb 16, 2015 3:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

chelle26
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:32 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby chelle26 » Mon Jan 21, 2013 11:45 am

dr123 wrote:64.5% is fantastic? Teh fuck?


that's a score lst comes up with, not the employment rate. I've seen several different quotes on the actual figure and I've calc. it myself. It seems to fall between 89%-93%. I'd say that's pretty good considering they're not even ranked in the top 50 law schools.

I hear all of you about it still not being a good enough school, but I also hear from a lot of practicing lawyers that it's better to go to a lower ranked regional school and be in the upper echelon than to go to a t14 school and be nobody. I also have connections in Atlanta and I know that there are jobs to be had if you make an impression during your time there. (I exaggerated calling it a "booming" market and "fantastic" employment rate, but I know there are real opportunities there.)

I would love to know why the people who voted for NE did so. I'm only seeing negative feedback about that school.

User avatar
somewhatwayward
Posts: 1446
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2009 5:10 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby somewhatwayward » Mon Jan 21, 2013 12:12 pm

chelle26 wrote:
dr123 wrote:64.5% is fantastic? Teh fuck?


that's a score lst comes up with, not the employment rate. I've seen several different quotes on the actual figure and I've calc. it myself. It seems to fall between 89%-93%. I'd say that's pretty good considering they're not even ranked in the top 50 law schools.

I hear all of you about it still not being a good enough school, but I also hear from a lot of practicing lawyers that it's better to go to a lower ranked regional school and be in the upper echelon than to go to a t14 school and be nobody. I also have connections in Atlanta and I know that there are jobs to be had if you make an impression during your time there. (I exaggerated calling it a "booming" market and "fantastic" employment rate, but I know there are real opportunities there.)

I would love to know why the people who voted for NE did so. I'm only seeing negative feedback about that school.


The LST figure is the number of people employed in full-time (ie, the type of job that may possibly pay enough to cover your loan payments) long-term (ie, the type of job that will possibly continue long enough for you to make all your loan payments) legal (ie, the kind of job you spent three years studying for) jobs. The other figures include part-time work, short-term work, and, worse yet, non-legal jobs like barista at Starbucks and insurance salesperson. I find it extremely hard to believe that people spend $150K and three years of their life studying law to become an insurance salesperson yet schools happily include these jobs in their employment figures on their websites. Meanwhile they deride organizations like LST that attempt to distill the number of good employment outcomes by saying that the JD is "versatile" and not only meant to be used in the legal field. In fact, many of their students come to get the degree with the intention of going into "business" (ie, Starbucks barista). If you consider part-time, short-term, or unrelated jobs to be satisfactory outcomes for you, then go by the 80% figure. If not, you should recognize that this school gives you about a 2/3 chance of landing a legal job, which will likely pay about $40K/year.

That is not to say that GA State is singularly terrible. In fact, it is a better choice than many schools that are similarly-regarded because it is cheaper and does appear to place a little bit better albeit into not very desirable legal jobs. Between GA State and Northeastern, I think GA State is the clear winner simply because it is much cheaper, but TCR is to retake the LSAT and get some much better options on the table.

User avatar
BruceWayne
Posts: 2032
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby BruceWayne » Mon Jan 21, 2013 12:52 pm

Chelle could you share the opportunities in Atlanta that you're talking about with us? I'm not being sarcastic--totally serious.

PRgradBYU
Posts: 1419
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:04 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby PRgradBYU » Mon Jan 21, 2013 5:23 pm

chelle26 wrote:I hear all of you about it still not being a good enough school, but I also hear from a lot of practicing lawyers that it's better to go to a lower ranked regional school and be in the upper echelon than to go to a t14 school and be nobody.


LST is a more credible source than "I hear from a lot of practicing lawyers," no offense.

chelle26 wrote:I'm only seeing negative feedback about that school.


Take the hint.

linquest
Posts: 143
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2008 11:06 am

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby linquest » Wed Jan 23, 2013 1:31 am

Northeastern grad here. Not voting either way (I don't have enough information about you to have an opinion), but I wanted to correct and expound on some information here.

Richie Tenenbaum wrote:3) Going to Northeastern with the goal of getting a legal job in a different state is most definitely a bad idea.
4) I've only read the description on Northeastern's website, but their co-op program does not seem that special. First off, everyone is trying to do legal work during the summers. That's not special. Plus, Northeastern having classes in part of the summer time might be a headache and potentially limit some of the stuff you can do in the summer. Secondly, internships during the school year are fairly common. That's part of the reason why it's a good idea to go to a school in an area you want to work.


The co-op system: The NUSL co-op system is totally unique. It consists of 4 _full-time_ internships because we're on a quarter system in the 2L/3L years. You can do either winter/summer or spring/fall rotations between classes/co-ops (more explanation of the system here- --LinkRemoved-- ). Being available full-time outside of summer can be a huge advantage because most students from other schools are not- you have less competition for more "prestigious" employers (i.e. fed judges and corporate firms) and you typically get more facetime and feedback from attorneys/supervisors since there will be fewer (if any) fellow interns to divide attention.

You'll have to research the stats, but I wouldn't be surprised if historically, NUSL graduates are placed more frequently/further outside of the Boston region than GSU students are outside of Atlanta. Part of this is simply due to the fact that NUSL has a HUGE out-of-state population, and few of them are committed to staying in Boston after they matriculate. When I was at NUSL, it seemed like less than half the students from entering classes were MA residents. I hear that the out-of-state population at GSU is only 10%. And yes, the opportunity to co-op in multiple markets in addition to Boston helps you develop contacts and demonstrate interest in working in a different region. There's a strong alumni presence in NYC, DC, and San Francisco.

As far as transferring to GSU, you might want to ask GSU Admissions if they've ever admitted a transfer student from NUSL. I had classmates that transferred to BU, BC, and lower-ranked law schools (for family reasons), but don't know about other T1/T2 schools.

Also, please don't ever, ever tell an attorney you want to practice "international law" unless you're aiming for a condescending eye roll. It's like saying, "I want to specialize in American law."

User avatar
cahwc12
Posts: 941
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 4:49 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby cahwc12 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 10:50 am

This first part is just a thought exercise here, but something to keep in mind.

In general (not always), solo jobs and jobs with 2-10 attorneys for new graduates aren't considered real legal jobs, but rather amalgamations of graduates who can't otherwise fine gainful employment. Now, one thing that should stand out to you here is that GSU is in Atlanta, but 31% of its graduates end up in these 2-10 jobs... that's about half the number of employed graduates.

To put that in perspective I made this chart from http://employmentsummary.abaquestionnaire.org/:

Image

Of all ABA Approved law schools, GSU has the 10th most students employed in 2-10 lawyers. Most of the other schools in that top 10 list are located in rural areas where those 2-10 jobs are less likely to be merely graduates banding together (how much less likely is unknown).


Your initial post espouses a profound ignorance of both law school admissions and legal employment at large--I don't intend that to be a rude comment, but rather an illuminating one. It's good that you posted here and hopefully people here can steer you in the right direction. Some of the red flags (as others have already pointed out) include:

1) You've mentioned both tuition and COL, but didn't seem like you've mentally added 2+2 here. COA for both of these schools will run you well over $100,000 in debt. Ask yourself if either of these schools is really worth paying $100,000 or more of your future earnings PLUS the opportunity cost of not being gainfully employed for at least 2.5 years (assuming full summer employment and employment immediately after graduation, which is the best possible scenario). You mention in a later post that you "have money saved up, so debt isn't an issue." That money isn't in gift cards redeemable only in law school COA dollars. Don't throw your/your parents' money away on the best of a set of terrible decisions.

2) You are most interested in "international law" but admit that you have no idea what that really means. That's because it doesn't mean anything. Of all the people I've ever heard of interested in international law, exactly one got one of those mythical jobs and he went to Georgetown at the tail end of the anomalous boom of the early-mid 00's AND was a very special snowflake. It's just not going to happen for you at Georgia State or Northeastern.

3) Transferring from either of these schools to the other is a bad idea. Instead of $100k you'll end up with $200k debt. You'll lose out on in-state tuition at GSU or you'll lose out on the 30k/yr discount at NE.

4) You're seriously considering NE because of a specialty program. Edit: and to the poster above actually trying to defend this idea as giving you an advantage in federal clerkships or biglaw:
Image

5) You don't plan on working in NE's immediate region. Compare BC's 48% MA employment to NE's 54% MA employment. Where do you think those 20% unreported and 12% unemployed at NE are at?

6) You mention wanting to get a legal job in another country. What exactly would you intend to do? Here's a quick assignment: open a word processor and write 1 page on what you would do in the day-to-day operations as an international lawyer. When you can't write more than three lines and it sounds like "well I'll help international refugees with my knowledge of the American legal system and my Georgia state bar membership on a 9-5 schedule and eat delicious western European lunches each day" then you'll understand.


I recommend this ebook to all my LSAT students and often in threads like these, and think you should read it:
Don't Go to Law School by Paul Campos
It's free if you're an amazon prime member, and otherwise only $5.00 for a cornucopia of the best available information around.

Once you've read that, you'll have a better perspective on what you are otherwise about to get yourself into.

The short of it is this:

Georgia State is unarguably and objectively a better option for you than Northeastern. However, neither of these is likely to be fruitful and get you where you want to go, and both are likely to leave you with crippling, nondischargeable debt and/or under-employment. If you were to add a third option in your poll and allow for re-voting, most people would probably choose "Neither."

chelle26
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:32 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby chelle26 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 7:47 pm

cahwc12 wrote:2) You are most interested in "international law" but admit that you have no idea what that really means. That's because it doesn't mean anything. Of all the people I've ever heard of interested in international law, exactly one got one of those mythical jobs and he went to Georgetown at the tail end of the anomalous boom of the early-mid 00's AND was a very special snowflake. It's just not going to happen for you at Georgia State or Northeastern.

I am resigning myself to the fact that I'm not going to get to work overseas. I'll never use the phrase international law again, promise.
cahwc12 wrote:I recommend this ebook to all my LSAT students and often in threads like these, and think you should read it:
Don't Go to Law School by Paul Campos
It's free if you're an amazon prime member, and otherwise only $5.00 for a cornucopia of the best available information around.

Once you've read that, you'll have a better perspective on what you are otherwise about to get yourself into.

The short of it is this:

Georgia State is unarguably and objectively a better option for you than Northeastern. However, neither of these is likely to be fruitful and get you where you want to go, and both are likely to leave you with crippling, nondischargeable debt and/or under-employment. If you were to add a third option in your poll and allow for re-voting, most people would probably choose "Neither."

Okay, so neither. Where do I go then? I'm (most likely) not going to get above a 165 on my LSAT because I never have on a practice test in any situation, so I just don't see the point in retaking even if I was trying to get a scholarship from a t14 school.

I do realize that the legal profession is in a crisis. I already expected that I would only make 40k or maybe not even get a job at first. I just don't see a better option for myself. GA State does not give scholarships, period. They are one of the least expensive law schools in the country, so retaking would not help me there. 30k annually is NE's biggest scholarship, so retaking also would not help me there.

If there was another type of graduate school that was in less of a crisis and still within the interests of a liberal arts major, I would consider it. I just don't see it. Obtaining a phD in History or English is even more of a risk. At least law school only consumes 3 years of my life.

I will read Campos' book, at least so that I don't sound like such an airhead upon entering law school. In the meantime, any additional constructive criticism is welcomed from all.

User avatar
cinephile
Posts: 3469
Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:50 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby cinephile » Wed Jan 23, 2013 8:07 pm

As far as not scoring about a 165, you never know until you try. Reevaluate how you were studying to avoid the mistakes you made last time. And remember that a score of 165 could still come up as a 168 due to the margin of error.

chelle26
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:32 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby chelle26 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 9:19 pm

3.9/162 I've taken the LSAT once. I only have work experience as a part-time barista. I volunteer weekly at the American Cancer Society.

Cinephile, I realize I MIGHT raise my score financially. I just don't see how that's worth postponing law school another year - esp. with the fact that almost certainly I'm not going to get a full scholarship from a local school regardless of how much I raise my score.

As a side note, I was also accepted into UGA. It is much higher ranked than my other options but I'd already ruled it out because 1. it's employment statistics didn't seem any better than ga state 2. it has higher tuition than ga state and 3. it's in Athens, and I want to live in a big city. BUT if anyone knows something I don't and thinks it's a worthy option, please let me know.

User avatar
cinephile
Posts: 3469
Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:50 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby cinephile » Wed Jan 23, 2013 9:23 pm

chelle26 wrote:3.9/162 I've taken the LSAT once. I only have work experience as a part-time barista. I volunteer weekly at the American Cancer Society.

Cinephile, I realize I MIGHT raise my score financially. I just don't see how that's worth postponing law school another year - esp. with the fact that almost certainly I'm not going to get a full scholarship from a local school regardless of how much I raise my score.



I have never ever heard anyone say they were sorry they waited. But loads of people, myself included, regret going without a retake. It is always worth waiting because if you do worse, they'll still take your highest score, but if you do better, you've radically changed your options. A year is just a year. Enjoy it, work, save, go out, be young and happy.

chelle26
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:32 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby chelle26 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 9:32 pm

cinephile wrote:
chelle26 wrote:3.9/162 I've taken the LSAT once. I only have work experience as a part-time barista. I volunteer weekly at the American Cancer Society.

Cinephile, I realize I MIGHT raise my score financially. I just don't see how that's worth postponing law school another year - esp. with the fact that almost certainly I'm not going to get a full scholarship from a local school regardless of how much I raise my score.



I have never ever heard anyone say they were sorry they waited. But loads of people, myself included, regret going without a retake. It is always worth waiting because if you do worse, they'll still take your highest score, but if you do better, you've radically changed your options. A year is just a year. Enjoy it, work, save, go out, be young and happy.


My closest friend going to law school waited a year, and it was a mistake. He studied extensively. He got a worse score and now has to write an addendum. He buckled under pressure during the examination. I'm similarly anxious like him. So to me, it does seem like a bit of a risk taking a year off.

And as far as I know, I'm not going to be able to pull a full scholarship out of GA State or UGA even if I raise my score (please someone, correct me if I'm wrong).

I don't mean to be whiny or argumentative. I really do appreciate the advice, and I'll consider it. It's just a big decision to take a year off. My dad, who is also the source of funding for law school, is dead set against it. And my hometown sucks. There are minimal opportunities here to do anything at all professionally, even as an intern.

uvabro
Posts: 405
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:44 pm

Re: Northeastern v. Georgia State

Postby uvabro » Wed Jan 23, 2013 9:34 pm

chelle26 wrote:
cinephile wrote:
chelle26 wrote:3.9/162 I've taken the LSAT once. I only have work experience as a part-time barista. I volunteer weekly at the American Cancer Society.

Cinephile, I realize I MIGHT raise my score financially. I just don't see how that's worth postponing law school another year - esp. with the fact that almost certainly I'm not going to get a full scholarship from a local school regardless of how much I raise my score.



I have never ever heard anyone say they were sorry they waited. But loads of people, myself included, regret going without a retake. It is always worth waiting because if you do worse, they'll still take your highest score, but if you do better, you've radically changed your options. A year is just a year. Enjoy it, work, save, go out, be young and happy.


My closest friend going to law school waited a year, and it was a mistake. He studied extensively. He got a worse score and now has to write an addendum. He buckled under pressure during the examination. I'm similarly anxious like him. So to me, it does seem like a bit of a risk taking a year off.

And as far as I know, I'm not going to be able to pull a full scholarship out of GA State or UGA even if I raise my score (please someone, correct me if I'm wrong).

I don't mean to be whiny or argumentative. I really do appreciate the advice, and I'll consider it. It's just a big decision to take a year off. My dad, who is also the source of funding for law school, is dead set against it. And my hometown sucks. There are minimal opportunities here to do anything at all professionally, even as an intern.

as long as our taxes don't have to pay for the failed loan repayment, follow your heart.




Return to “Choosing a Law School”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests