What should I do

(Rankings, Profiles, Tuition, Student Life, . . . )
skri65
Posts: 484
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 11:07 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby skri65 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:59 pm

bk1 wrote:
skri65 wrote:The question is whether you see yourself being a software engineer for the rest of your life.

You can always go to law school later.


I always hear this but to me it's a little faulty. True, one can always enroll in law school. But five years down the line, and most certainly ten years down the line, I will have a family, and the assumption that my family could sustain three years without a primary income is untrue.

User avatar
bk1
Posts: 18402
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:06 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby bk1 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:02 pm

skri65 wrote:I always hear this but to me it's a little faulty. True, one can always enroll in law school. But five years down the line, and most certainly ten years down the line, I will have a family, and the assumption that my family could sustain three years without a primary income is untrue.

This is what loans and savings are for (and possibly having the other parent be an earner).

skri65
Posts: 484
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 11:07 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby skri65 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:05 pm

bk1 wrote:
skri65 wrote:I always hear this but to me it's a little faulty. True, one can always enroll in law school. But five years down the line, and most certainly ten years down the line, I will have a family, and the assumption that my family could sustain three years without a primary income is untrue.

This is what loans and savings are for (and possibly having the other parent be an earner).


In many cases, the other parent isn't the earner. And in most cases, young people don't have the sufficient savings to just take three years off. Also, good luck raising kids on loans.

The point is, for many people, law school isn't "always there." For most people, it makes sense to enroll while younger (for the record, I agree with the general consensus that people should take a couple years off before law school..it is what i am doing). But it's not as simple as just saying, "law school is always there"...especially for those already with a significant other or those with a family in mind.
Last edited by skri65 on Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:18 pm, edited 5 times in total.

User avatar
Micdiddy
Posts: 2189
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 3:38 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby Micdiddy » Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:12 pm

skri65 wrote:
bk1 wrote:
skri65 wrote:I always hear this but to me it's a little faulty. True, one can always enroll in law school. But five years down the line, and most certainly ten years down the line, I will have a family, and the assumption that my family could sustain three years without a primary income is untrue.

This is what loans and savings are for (and possibly having the other parent be an earner).


In many cases, the other parent isn't the earner. And in most cases, young people don't have the sufficient savings to just take three years off. Also, good luck raising kids on loans.

The point is, for many people, law school isn't "always there." For most people, it makes sense to enroll while younger (for the record, I agree with the general consensus that people should take a couple years off before law school..it is what i am doing). But it's not as simple as just saying, "law school is always there"...especially for those already with a significant other.


I tend to agree. Just turned 26 already been married for a year and if I didn't go to law school now before we had kids I would need find some serious career path fast. I'm hesitant even waiting another year, though I probably should logistically.

fallingup
Posts: 481
Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2010 4:34 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby fallingup » Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:13 pm

yeah, i agree. especially as a woman who'd like to have a kid within the next 10 years, it's perfectly rational for me to want to get higher ed out of the way sooner rather than later. kids cost $$$

User avatar
bk1
Posts: 18402
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:06 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby bk1 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:28 pm

skri65 wrote:In many cases, the other parent isn't the earner. And in most cases, young people don't have the sufficient savings to just take three years off. Also, good luck raising kids on loans.

The point is, for many people, law school isn't "always there." For most people, it makes sense to enroll while younger (for the record, I agree with the general consensus that people should take a couple years off before law school..it is what i am doing). But it's not as simple as just saying, "law school is always there"...especially for those already with a significant other or those with a family in mind.

Young people don't have savings, but people who have worked for a while do (or at least should), which is what we're talking about. Plenty of my classmates at NU do the law school thing with a spouse and kids.

I'm not saying it's easy, nor am I saying that getting education earlier isn't ideal. What I am saying is that it's definitely feasible and that, even with the risks of delaying education, rushing into law school might be riskier than waiting to get education later due to the risks of law school itself.

skri65
Posts: 484
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 11:07 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby skri65 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:42 pm

bk1 wrote:
skri65 wrote:In many cases, the other parent isn't the earner. And in most cases, young people don't have the sufficient savings to just take three years off. Also, good luck raising kids on loans.

The point is, for many people, law school isn't "always there." For most people, it makes sense to enroll while younger (for the record, I agree with the general consensus that people should take a couple years off before law school..it is what i am doing). But it's not as simple as just saying, "law school is always there"...especially for those already with a significant other or those with a family in mind.

Young people don't have savings, but people who have worked for a while do (or at least should), which is what we're talking about. Plenty of my classmates at NU do the law school thing with a spouse and kids.

I'm not saying it's easy, nor am I saying that getting education earlier isn't ideal. What I am saying is that it's definitely feasible and that, even with the risks of delaying education, rushing into law school might be riskier than waiting to get education later due to the risks of law school itself.



First off, many people who don't have a nice job already and have been working for a few years don't have significant savings, let alone enough to cover the mountain of costs that involve beginning a family. People get savings when they have enough money to save, which many people don't.

You are right in that they are risky in different ways. Obviously no one should "rush" into law school in the sense of doing something that is stupid. On the flip side, the blanket statement that law school "is always there" is just not true for many. It's a cliche. There's always risks with law school, and I guess it depends on which risks you're willing to take. For some, waiting to go to law school is a large risk in and of itself. It risks the chance of gaining a law degree at all, especially if you're not 22 anymore and have responsibilities to people besides yourself.

Which risks matter more really should be taken in a case-by-case basis rather than responded to with blanket cliches. This forum has enough of those.

cooldude87
Posts: 177
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:51 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby cooldude87 » Fri Jan 18, 2013 7:20 pm

ok you guys can stop commenting on this thread now, i'm prolly not going to lawl skool

User avatar
Crowing
Posts: 2636
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby Crowing » Sat Jan 19, 2013 4:08 pm

Suralin wrote:
buddytyler wrote:
Micdiddy wrote:I can barely think of any UG degree that has a good chance at a 50k+ job, let alone accounting/engineering. With that said I can think of little reason to attend any TT school without basically a verbally agreement from a local firm that they will hire you afterwards.
What's the third option?

UG degree in anything computer-related (CIS/CS) all but guarantees you a 50k+ 40hr/week job. Source: I graduated with a CIS degree a year ago and these jobs exist in abundance.


Even if the degree is from a liberal arts college (decent non-technical programs, but CS program is not well-known)? I've been debating changing my major from philosophy to computer science; only problem is that it would require at least an extra semester.

Is the job market really that good for people with CS undergrad degrees?

(Sorry for hijacking, but somewhat relevant.)


My friend is at a non-prestigious LAC and is a 3rd year CS student. He interviewed with 4 or 5 on-campus recruiters in the fall and got three post-graduation job offers along with paid summer work. Most of his friends didn't do as well but I think the main advantage he has (as his grades aren't fantastic) is that he has a really magnetic personality and is great at interviewing which is a rarity within the CS world.

User avatar
suralin
better than you
Posts: 15013
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:52 am

Re: What should I do

Postby suralin » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:53 pm

Crowing wrote:
Suralin wrote:
buddytyler wrote:
Micdiddy wrote:I can barely think of any UG degree that has a good chance at a 50k+ job, let alone accounting/engineering. With that said I can think of little reason to attend any TT school without basically a verbally agreement from a local firm that they will hire you afterwards.
What's the third option?

UG degree in anything computer-related (CIS/CS) all but guarantees you a 50k+ 40hr/week job. Source: I graduated with a CIS degree a year ago and these jobs exist in abundance.


Even if the degree is from a liberal arts college (decent non-technical programs, but CS program is not well-known)? I've been debating changing my major from philosophy to computer science; only problem is that it would require at least an extra semester.

Is the job market really that good for people with CS undergrad degrees?

(Sorry for hijacking, but somewhat relevant.)


My friend is at a non-prestigious LAC and is a 3rd year CS student. He interviewed with 4 or 5 on-campus recruiters in the fall and got three post-graduation job offers along with paid summer work. Most of his friends didn't do as well but I think the main advantage he has (as his grades aren't fantastic) is that he has a really magnetic personality and is great at interviewing which is a rarity within the CS world.


Yeah, I've heard similar things before (re: CS people being not so great at interviewing). I guess that implies that if you're a CS major and are non-aspie/have normal social skills, you're pretty attractive to employers. Bodes pretty well for me then :D

User avatar
Crowing
Posts: 2636
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: What should I do

Postby Crowing » Sun Jan 20, 2013 12:04 am

My dad is an IT director without an IT background (managerial) so I hear plenty of stories about interviewing CS grads.

e.g.

"So why did you choose to study CS?"

"I dunno; I liked it I guess."




Return to “Choosing a Law School”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: emirleee and 5 guests