Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

(Rankings, Profiles, Tuition, Student Life, . . . )

Which T-14 Law Degree is the Least Portable?

University of Chicago
8
2%
NYU
13
4%
UC Berkeley
27
8%
University of Pennsylvania
7
2%
University of Virginia
33
10%
University of Michigan
28
8%
Duke University
37
11%
Northwestern University
27
8%
Cornell University
76
22%
Georgetown University
84
25%
 
Total votes: 340

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dingbat
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby dingbat » Fri Oct 26, 2012 12:00 am

bizzybone1313 wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:Living in Colorado is my main goal, which I have always known is going to be a very uphill battle.

155 unintentional pun.


Or maybe not.....my work experience in psychic energy related fields should get me interviews in Colorado.

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Kronk
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Kronk » Fri Oct 26, 2012 1:10 am

K. I got bored as fuck after the first page of this thread. But you living in Texas will not help you in Colorado. You are fucked in Colorado for SAs, almost surely. I was about to type out advice on my job search and what yours would entail, but I realized it was worthless. If you want to do something like work for the public defender, work for the DA, do something like legal aid, maybe get on it 1L summer and you'll have a shot. Or marry a Coloradoan? I don't know. If you want an SA I don't care where you go, you're 95% fucked. They get lots of applicants from HYS and other top schools, and those people grew up in Colorado. Everyone wants to move back there.

Civil rights law? Doesn't exist here. Go somewhere else. Staying in Texas is probably intelligent. Immigration? Very small practices, bro. Energy law? Sure, except that it's the most desirable type of law here.

I suggest practicing first and trying to transfer in.

tl;dr LOL @ connections, you're fucked, I apologize.

Love,
Kronk

Lord Randolph McDuff
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Lord Randolph McDuff » Fri Oct 26, 2012 11:45 am

Didn't read everything, but your number 1 goal is working in Colorado and you are interested in politics.

Go to CU-Boulder. Duh.

No one in "politics" in Colorado are going to care about your Northwestern degree... BC you aren't from Colorado, your chances of getting work in Colorado big law or otherwise are way higher from CU than from any other school. All politics and most of getting a job is about who you know. Go to the state school and try to meet everyone. Same advise for if you wanted to work in some other random state without ties-- go to the local school.

People can be so misguided about the "prestige" of going to a top school. It shows a real lack of understanding about local cultures.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:00 pm

Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:Didn't read everything, but your number 1 goal is working in Colorado and you are interested in politics.

Go to CU-Boulder. Duh.

No one in "politics" in Colorado are going to care about your Northwestern degree... BC you aren't from Colorado, your chances of getting work in Colorado big law or otherwise are way higher from CU than from any other school. All politics and most of getting a job is about who you know. Go to the state school and try to meet everyone. Same advise for if you wanted to work in some other random state without ties-- go to the local school.

People can be so misguided about the "prestige" of going to a top school. It shows a real lack of understanding about local cultures.


Its real easy to say just go to CU-Boulder. When people on this board suggest to go to the state school of the state where you want to be a politician, this strategy is flawed on so many levels. Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successfull. By following this strategy, a person could be left holding the bag with a non-prestigious law degree. What if I later want to practice law again or do something non-legal in another state? Why wouldn't I go the T-14 route? If someone is capable of comfortably being admitted to a T-14 with some scholarship money, there is not any reason for someone to go to CU-Boulder or another lesser known state school. It would be a different story if the name of the state school was UT-Austin, the University of North Carolina or another highly regarded state school ranked in the 20's, but not a state school that is in the bottom of the first tier or even in the second tier. Here are a few examples in Colorado no less that your advice is misguided: Former U.S. Senator Ken Salazar (University of Michigan Law), U.S. Senator Michael Bennet (Yale Law) and U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette (NYU Law). It may be true that a lot of politicians hold law degrees from their state schools, but it isn't the best decision for most people's long term career.

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Kronk
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Kronk » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:25 pm

Michael Bennet was appointed for his first term, not sure if you knew that. He was elected the second time by a hair over a dude that claimed being gay was a choice.

I would just find a different liberal state to move into.

Also I would repeat this to yourself:

Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successful

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bizzybone1313
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:30 pm

Kronk wrote:Michael Bennet was appointed for his first term, not sure if you knew that. He was elected the second time by a hair over a dude that claimed being gay was a choice.

I would just find a different liberal state to move into.

Also I would repeat this to yourself:

Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successful


He was appointed in large part, because of what he was able to accomplish with his Yale Law degree. His Yale Law degree positioned him to bundle a few significant accomplishments to be selected for that Senate seat. He would have never made it there without the Yale Law degree. As for you quoting what I said, that is exactly the point of getting an elite law degree. If someone fails, they can fall back on it and do something else.

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Cerebro
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Cerebro » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:49 pm

bizzybone1313 wrote:
Kronk wrote:Michael Bennet was appointed for his first term, not sure if you knew that. He was elected the second time by a hair over a dude that claimed being gay was a choice.

I would just find a different liberal state to move into.

Also I would repeat this to yourself:

Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successful


He was appointed in large part, because of what he was able to accomplish with his Yale Law degree. His Yale Law degree positioned him to bundle a few significant accomplishments to be selected for that Senate seat. He would have never made it there without the Yale Law degree. As for you quoting what I said, that is exactly the point of getting an elite law degree. If someone fails, they can fall back on it and do something else.


A law degree from YLS isn't necessary for failing and falling back on something else. You can succeed in politics by going to a TTT like SUCOL and graduating near the bottom of your class.

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Kronk
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Kronk » Fri Oct 26, 2012 6:53 pm

k. I mean he was a superintendent of schools. Not sure that his YLS degree got him that job in large part. No moreso than you could say my undergraduate degree from a state school put me in position to work in the legislature.

Just saying, our senator who was actually elected didn't even go to law school.

Lord Randolph McDuff
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Lord Randolph McDuff » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:26 pm

bizzybone1313 wrote:
Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:Didn't read everything, but your number 1 goal is working in Colorado and you are interested in politics.

Go to CU-Boulder. Duh.

No one in "politics" in Colorado are going to care about your Northwestern degree... BC you aren't from Colorado, your chances of getting work in Colorado big law or otherwise are way higher from CU than from any other school. All politics and most of getting a job is about who you know. Go to the state school and try to meet everyone. Same advise for if you wanted to work in some other random state without ties-- go to the local school.

People can be so misguided about the "prestige" of going to a top school. It shows a real lack of understanding about local cultures.


Its real easy to say just go to CU-Boulder. When people on this board suggest to go to the state school of the state where you want to be a politician, this strategy is flawed on so many levels. Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successfull. By following this strategy, a person could be left holding the bag with a non-prestigious law degree. What if I later want to practice law again or do something non-legal in another state? Why wouldn't I go the T-14 route? If someone is capable of comfortably being admitted to a T-14 with some scholarship money, there is not any reason for someone to go to CU-Boulder or another lesser known state school. It would be a different story if the name of the state school was UT-Austin, the University of North Carolina or another highly regarded state school ranked in the 20's, but not a state school that is in the bottom of the first tier or even in the second tier. Here are a few examples in Colorado no less that your advice is misguided: Former U.S. Senator Ken Salazar (University of Michigan Law), U.S. Senator Michael Bennet (Yale Law) and U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette (NYU Law). It may be true that a lot of politicians hold law degrees from their state schools, but it isn't the best decision for most people's long term career.



Your answer is horshit for a lot of reasons. No reason to go to "non-prestigious" schools if you can get into a "prestigious" one with some money... Don't go to TTT CU but UNC is ok... Then the strange anecdotal evidence. In ten years you'd probably cringe if you re read your post.

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dingbat
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby dingbat » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:34 pm

Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:
Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:Didn't read everything, but your number 1 goal is working in Colorado and you are interested in politics.

Go to CU-Boulder. Duh.

No one in "politics" in Colorado are going to care about your Northwestern degree... BC you aren't from Colorado, your chances of getting work in Colorado big law or otherwise are way higher from CU than from any other school. All politics and most of getting a job is about who you know. Go to the state school and try to meet everyone. Same advise for if you wanted to work in some other random state without ties-- go to the local school.

People can be so misguided about the "prestige" of going to a top school. It shows a real lack of understanding about local cultures.


Its real easy to say just go to CU-Boulder. When people on this board suggest to go to the state school of the state where you want to be a politician, this strategy is flawed on so many levels. Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successfull. By following this strategy, a person could be left holding the bag with a non-prestigious law degree. What if I later want to practice law again or do something non-legal in another state? Why wouldn't I go the T-14 route? If someone is capable of comfortably being admitted to a T-14 with some scholarship money, there is not any reason for someone to go to CU-Boulder or another lesser known state school. It would be a different story if the name of the state school was UT-Austin, the University of North Carolina or another highly regarded state school ranked in the 20's, but not a state school that is in the bottom of the first tier or even in the second tier. Here are a few examples in Colorado no less that your advice is misguided: Former U.S. Senator Ken Salazar (University of Michigan Law), U.S. Senator Michael Bennet (Yale Law) and U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette (NYU Law). It may be true that a lot of politicians hold law degrees from their state schools, but it isn't the best decision for most people's long term career.



Your answer is horshit for a lot of reasons. No reason to go to "non-prestigious" schools if you can get into a "prestigious" one with some money... Don't go to TTT CU but UNC is ok... Then the strange anecdotal evidence. In ten years you'd probably cringe if you re read your post.

TL/DR: University North Carolina (ranked 38) is worth turning down a T14, while University of Colorado: Boulder (ranked 44) is not

rad lulz
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby rad lulz » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:42 pm

dingbat wrote:
Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:
Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:Didn't read everything, but your number 1 goal is working in Colorado and you are interested in politics.

Go to CU-Boulder. Duh.

No one in "politics" in Colorado are going to care about your Northwestern degree... BC you aren't from Colorado, your chances of getting work in Colorado big law or otherwise are way higher from CU than from any other school. All politics and most of getting a job is about who you know. Go to the state school and try to meet everyone. Same advise for if you wanted to work in some other random state without ties-- go to the local school.

People can be so misguided about the "prestige" of going to a top school. It shows a real lack of understanding about local cultures.


Its real easy to say just go to CU-Boulder. When people on this board suggest to go to the state school of the state where you want to be a politician, this strategy is flawed on so many levels. Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successfull. By following this strategy, a person could be left holding the bag with a non-prestigious law degree. What if I later want to practice law again or do something non-legal in another state? Why wouldn't I go the T-14 route? If someone is capable of comfortably being admitted to a T-14 with some scholarship money, there is not any reason for someone to go to CU-Boulder or another lesser known state school. It would be a different story if the name of the state school was UT-Austin, the University of North Carolina or another highly regarded state school ranked in the 20's, but not a state school that is in the bottom of the first tier or even in the second tier. Here are a few examples in Colorado no less that your advice is misguided: Former U.S. Senator Ken Salazar (University of Michigan Law), U.S. Senator Michael Bennet (Yale Law) and U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette (NYU Law). It may be true that a lot of politicians hold law degrees from their state schools, but it isn't the best decision for most people's long term career.



Your answer is horshit for a lot of reasons. No reason to go to "non-prestigious" schools if you can get into a "prestigious" one with some money... Don't go to TTT CU but UNC is ok... Then the strange anecdotal evidence. In ten years you'd probably cringe if you re read your post.

TL/DR: University North Carolina (ranked 38) is worth turning down a T14, while University of Colorado: Boulder (ranked 44) is not

In before some ridiculous reference to lay prestige.

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Lawquacious
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Lawquacious » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:44 pm

dingbat wrote:
Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:
Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:Didn't read everything, but your number 1 goal is working in Colorado and you are interested in politics.

Go to CU-Boulder. Duh.

No one in "politics" in Colorado are going to care about your Northwestern degree... BC you aren't from Colorado, your chances of getting work in Colorado big law or otherwise are way higher from CU than from any other school. All politics and most of getting a job is about who you know. Go to the state school and try to meet everyone. Same advise for if you wanted to work in some other random state without ties-- go to the local school.

People can be so misguided about the "prestige" of going to a top school. It shows a real lack of understanding about local cultures.


Its real easy to say just go to CU-Boulder. When people on this board suggest to go to the state school of the state where you want to be a politician, this strategy is flawed on so many levels. Just because someone wants to be a politician it doesn't mean they will be successfull. By following this strategy, a person could be left holding the bag with a non-prestigious law degree. What if I later want to practice law again or do something non-legal in another state? Why wouldn't I go the T-14 route? If someone is capable of comfortably being admitted to a T-14 with some scholarship money, there is not any reason for someone to go to CU-Boulder or another lesser known state school. It would be a different story if the name of the state school was UT-Austin, the University of North Carolina or another highly regarded state school ranked in the 20's, but not a state school that is in the bottom of the first tier or even in the second tier. Here are a few examples in Colorado no less that your advice is misguided: Former U.S. Senator Ken Salazar (University of Michigan Law), U.S. Senator Michael Bennet (Yale Law) and U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette (NYU Law). It may be true that a lot of politicians hold law degrees from their state schools, but it isn't the best decision for most people's long term career.



Your answer is horshit for a lot of reasons. No reason to go to "non-prestigious" schools if you can get into a "prestigious" one with some money... Don't go to TTT CU but UNC is ok... Then the strange anecdotal evidence. In ten years you'd probably cringe if you re read your post.

TL/DR: University North Carolina (ranked 38) is worth turning down a T14, while University of Colorado: Boulder (ranked 44) is not


Lol. For someone who wants to end up outside of NC? NOOOOOOOOOO..... For someone who wants to end up in CO? Man, WTF.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:45 pm

UNC's is highly underrated. UNC has a lot of lay prestige in the region. It produced John Edwards, right? Has CU Boulder ever produced a presidential candidate? For almost everyone at the T-14, we get to cough up money for the tuition. Plus, UNC is very, very cheap for in state people. It isn't too far behind UT Austin as far as bang for the buck. In law school, I won't be taking out $20K in COL loans every year. That is dumb.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:49 pm

UNC does have a ridiculous amount lay prestige. It produced Michael Jordan. Did you catch that? Michael freaking Jordan!!!!!! The greatest to ever pick up a basketball.

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paratactical
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby paratactical » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:51 pm

bizzybone1313 wrote:UNC does have a ridiculous amount lay prestige. It produced Michael Jordan. Did you catch that? Michael freaking Jordan!!!!!! The greatest to ever pick up a basketball.

Trolls gon troll.

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IAFG
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby IAFG » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:04 pm

paratactical wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:UNC does have a ridiculous amount lay prestige. It produced Michael Jordan. Did you catch that? Michael freaking Jordan!!!!!! The greatest to ever pick up a basketball.

Trolls gon troll.

In TLS's better days, when people tried to start BS threads like this, we told them to come back with actual admissions. This clown doesn't even claim to have an LSAT score.

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Kronk
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Kronk » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:04 pm

bizzybone1313 wrote:UNC's is highly underrated. UNC has a lot of lay prestige in the region. It produced John Edwards, right? Has CU Boulder ever produced a presidential candidate? For almost everyone at the T-14, we get to cough up money for the tuition. Plus, UNC is very, very cheap for in state people. It isn't too far behind UT Austin as far as bang for the buck. In law school, I won't be taking out $20K in COL loans every year. That is dumb.


lol. I love how your fucking reasoning is based on anecdotal cases of "this one politician went here" or "this one politician" did this. Stupidest logic I've seen in awhile.

In Colorado, our current governor didn't go to law school. The governor before him, who I worked for, got his law degree at CU Boulder. On our supreme court, we have 3 CU grads, a University of Utah grad, a YLS grad, a UChi grad, a Boalt grad and a University of Denver grad.

No one in politics cares what school you went to, particularly in Colorado. You don't get bonus points for going to HYS in politics here, I promise you. My dad was in politics in Colorado for a long time without a law degree. It's a lot more important that you are actually involved in Colorado organizations, involved in your party in Colorado early on, and build connections with local government officials and politicians in your areas. None of which you have done because you have a skewed and wrong idea of what it takes to do what you want here.

The proper answer would be para's: if you actually want to do something in Colorado, you should probably start by moving here for a couple years. Or you can go to law school, graduate at 30, THEN come and start making connections. That makes a lot of sense.
Last edited by Kronk on Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Kronk
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Kronk » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:05 pm

Also, for lulz, I looked up the schools that have produced a "presidential candidate" in the primaries for one of the two major parties:

Joe Biden -- Syracuse University, J.D.
Chris Dodd -- University Louisville, J.D.
Mike Gravel -- No J.D.
Dennis Kucinich -- No J.D., masters from Case Western Reserve University
Bill Richardson -- No J.D.
John Kerry -- Boston College, J.D.
Al Gore -- No J.D.
Bill Bradley -- No J.D.
Tom Harkin -- Catholic University, J.D.

That's just from 4 democratic primaries (2008, 2004, 2000, 1992). Biden's sure wishing he had gone to Yale though, because then he would be galactic overlord.

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Kronk
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Kronk » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:06 pm

Fuck, he's a troll after I typed that shit out?

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paratactical
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby paratactical » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:07 pm

Kronk wrote:Fuck, he's a troll after I typed that shit out?

I wasn't sure until the Michael Jordan post. Sorry holmes.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:20 pm

I am not a troll. When I decide on where I will ultimately attend, I will post a picture of my acceptance letter. Here is the key question as it pertains to your list of politicians: Did any of those people actually become President? The answer is no. Anyone can run for president, but the public gets to decide. Like it or not, a person's education (usually an elite one) greatly enhances a major politician's chances of becoming POTUS. Since this is TLS, I can't really believe you guys are arguing otherwise. What's next? The next nominee to the Supreme Court is going to be a graduate from CU Boulder.

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Kronk
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby Kronk » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:27 pm

bizzybone1313 wrote:UNC's is highly underrated. UNC has a lot of lay prestige in the region. It produced John Edwards, right? Has CU Boulder ever produced a presidential candidate?


bizzybone1313 wrote:Did any of those people actually become President?


k.


I think it's worth noting that I never said CU Boulder was the right way to go. I just said you have no clue what the fuck you're talking about w/r/t what it takes to be a politician in Colorado. A prestigious law degree is probably the least important pick-up.

Also I still think you're trolling.

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beachbum
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby beachbum » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:34 pm

Duke produced Richard Nixon. Discuss.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:40 pm

Duke has a lot of lay prestige. That makes sense. Its Duke!!!!!!! You know, its in the T-14. By the way, I am having second thoughts amigo. I am probably going to apply to Duke because of that lay prestige. I'm going to have to break my promise from the other day.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: Least Portable T-14 Law Degree

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Oct 26, 2012 10:22 pm

IAFG wrote:
paratactical wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:UNC does have a ridiculous amount lay prestige. It produced Michael Jordan. Did you catch that? Michael freaking Jordan!!!!!! The greatest to ever pick up a basketball.

Trolls gon troll.

In TLS's better days, when people tried to start BS threads like this, we told them to come back with actual admissions. This clown doesn't even claim to have an LSAT score.


I do not understand why you and about three other posters on this site have such a problem with me. I will get the magic LSAT number. I can assure you of that. The threads I have produced cannot possibly be that dumb. All three of them combined have received thousands of views. I will not be posting a thread for a while. I asked the three main questions that are very important to me. And by the way, the way universities' athletic teams perform does unfornuately translate to some lay prestige in our dumbed down America. The mainstream media (or lamestream if we are to believe Sarah Palin) talked non-stop about how Jeremey Lin is a graduate from Harvard when he blew up. I mean, those geeks at Cambridge cannot possibly be good at sports, right?

Who is that person in your picture by the way? Is that you? If it is, you are real sexy.




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