Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

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Sheffield
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby Sheffield » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:05 am

Does a 60% employment rate sound accurate? This is what LST reported for '11.

Aqualibrium
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby Aqualibrium » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:07 am

HeavenWood wrote:
Rina814 wrote:1) There is no one left in the Career Services office because everyone quit. Even when they actually HAD employees, they did not offer any assistance or advice in obtaining a summer internship, nor did they return phone calls or emails. The Richmond job bank website has 6-7 unpaid positions posted at any given time - most of which are not even in the Richmond area. The Richmond job market is beyond lackluster - any distinguished firms in the area are hiring UVA students.
2) They ran out of funding and were not able to provide the stipend for government/public interest internships for students as they promised.
3) The facilities (classrooms, library, etc.) are inadequate and cannot accommodate the amount of students that have been admitted.
4) There is an incredibly limited number of classes offered, which does not give students the opportunity to explore areas of interest beyond basic substantive law courses.
5) Richmond offers very few clinic opportunities and networking events in order to gain hands-on experience for real world practice.

I can go on forever about why Richmond is poor investment. Like I said, I am genuinely trying to inform prospective students about my 1L year at Richmond Law - these are all things I wish I was aware of when I was making my decision. Now that I know better, I would be happy to answer any questions that prospective students have about the Richmond experience.

Reasons 1) and 2) are legitimate. The rest are pretty superficial, and in fact, are problems many top schools exhibit in varying degrees. I'm not trying to rain on your parade. It's just very important to remember that in many respects, law schools don't greatly differ across the spectrum.



Every party has a pooper, that's why OP invited you.

Rina814
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby Rina814 » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:11 am

If you read my original post, you would know that the school I transferred to does not exhibit any of those negative qualities. Maybe I'm incredibly fortunate, but as far as I've heard, most schools have enough classrooms for their students and don't outsource them to a random undergraduate building. I don't think it's considered a luxury to be able to have an outlet to plug in my laptop when I'm in class - it's not superficial at all to expect that the building isn't so ancient that I might have to handwrite my notes. I also had 60+ classes to choose from at my new institution, as opposed to the 12 or so classes that Richmond offered per semester. Clinic opportunities are incredibly important for a lot of people, as well as student organizations, journals, networking events, etc. If I'm investing so much in my law degree, I would expect to have all these things available to me. I know from first hand experience that not all schools are so disappointing - if you had all the information, why wouldn't you choose a school that gives you far more resources and opportunities?

HeavenWood
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby HeavenWood » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:13 am

Rina814 wrote:If you read my original post, you would know that the school I transferred to does not exhibit any of those negative qualities. Maybe I'm incredibly fortunate, but as far as I've heard, most schools have enough classrooms for their students and don't outsource them to a random undergraduate building. I don't think it's considered a luxury to be able to have an outlet to plug in my laptop when I'm in class - it's not superficial at all to expect that the building isn't so ancient that I might have to handwrite my notes. I also had 60+ classes to choose from at my new institution, as opposed to the 12 or so classes that Richmond offered per semester. Clinic opportunities are incredibly important for a lot of people, as well as student organizations, journals, networking events, etc. If I'm investing so much in my law degree, I would expect to have all these things available to me. I know from first hand experience that not all schools are so disappointing - if you had all the information, why wouldn't you choose a school that gives you far more resources and opportunities?

This is fine when picking between peer schools, but the point of law school is getting a job.

Rina814
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby Rina814 » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:25 am

Hence reasons 1 and 2! IF YOU ATTEND RICHMOND, IT IS NOT LIKELY YOU WILL GET A JOB. Career Services will ignore your attempts to contact them and, in fact, will tell you to waitress or bartend instead of bothering to look for an internship because the "economy is bad". I was in the top 20% of my class, got on an academic journal, competed and secured a position on the Trial Advocacy Board, found a government agency internship on my own and did everything else under the sun to prepare for the job market. THEY WILL NOT SUPPORT YOU, HELP YOU, OR PROVIDE YOU WITH ANY GUIDANCE, no matter how hard you work or what you do.

You're right - the point of law school is to get a job. THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. If you are considering comparable law schools and Richmond is one of them, DO NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. I feel like I've sufficiently made my point - this was just a well-intended attempt to save others from making the same mistake. If it wasn't well received, then so be it.

HeavenWood
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby HeavenWood » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:32 am

Rina814 wrote:Hence reasons 1 and 2! IF YOU ATTEND RICHMOND, IT IS NOT LIKELY YOU WILL GET A JOB. Career Services will ignore your attempts to contact them and, in fact, will tell you to waitress or bartend instead of bothering to look for an internship because the "economy is bad". I was in the top 20% of my class, got on an academic journal, competed and secured a position on the Trial Advocacy Board, found a government agency internship on my own and did everything else under the sun to prepare for the job market. THEY WILL NOT SUPPORT YOU, HELP YOU, OR PROVIDE YOU WITH ANY GUIDANCE, no matter how hard you work or what you do.

You're right - the point of law school is to get a job. THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. If you are considering comparable law schools and Richmond is one of them, DO NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. I feel like I've sufficiently made my point - this was just a well-intended attempt to save others from making the same mistake. If it wasn't well received, then so be it.

And that's an excellent summation.

I like to think Penn does pretty well in most of those other categories you mention as well, but just a forewarning, career services staff tend to suck no matter where you go.

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North
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby North » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:41 am

Rina814 wrote:Hence reasons 1 and 2! IF YOU ATTEND RICHMOND, IT IS NOT LIKELY YOU WILL GET A JOB. Career Services will ignore your attempts to contact them and, in fact, will tell you to waitress or bartend instead of bothering to look for an internship because the "economy is bad". I was in the top 20% of my class, got on an academic journal, competed and secured a position on the Trial Advocacy Board, found a government agency internship on my own and did everything else under the sun to prepare for the job market. THEY WILL NOT SUPPORT YOU, HELP YOU, OR PROVIDE YOU WITH ANY GUIDANCE, no matter how hard you work or what you do.

You're right - the point of law school is to get a job. THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. If you are considering comparable law schools and Richmond is one of them, DO NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. I feel like I've sufficiently made my point - this was just a well-intended attempt to save others from making the same mistake. If it wasn't well received, then so be it.

You've misunderstood. TLS agrees that there are few circumstances wherein it would be a good idea to pay real money to attend Richmond Law. What HeavenWood, I, and a couple others seem to be interested in (might I be so bold) is why you, who seems to understand how legal hiring has come to operate and why a $200,000 TTT JD isn't a good idea for someone looking to start a career in law, went to Richmond AT ALL. You couldn't have known all that going in or you would have ran, not walked, away from that TTT.

We like the message (though some of the reasons are silly -- would you not go to Yale if they had no outlets in heir classrooms?), but don't understand YOU.

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hichvichwoh
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby hichvichwoh » Sat Sep 01, 2012 11:16 am

North wrote:
Rina814 wrote:Hence reasons 1 and 2! IF YOU ATTEND RICHMOND, IT IS NOT LIKELY YOU WILL GET A JOB. Career Services will ignore your attempts to contact them and, in fact, will tell you to waitress or bartend instead of bothering to look for an internship because the "economy is bad". I was in the top 20% of my class, got on an academic journal, competed and secured a position on the Trial Advocacy Board, found a government agency internship on my own and did everything else under the sun to prepare for the job market. THEY WILL NOT SUPPORT YOU, HELP YOU, OR PROVIDE YOU WITH ANY GUIDANCE, no matter how hard you work or what you do.

You're right - the point of law school is to get a job. THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. If you are considering comparable law schools and Richmond is one of them, DO NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. I feel like I've sufficiently made my point - this was just a well-intended attempt to save others from making the same mistake. If it wasn't well received, then so be it.

You've misunderstood. TLS agrees that there are few circumstances wherein it would be a good idea to pay real money to attend Richmond Law. What HeavenWood, I, and a couple others seem to be interested in (might I be so bold) is why you, who seems to understand how legal hiring has come to operate and why a $200,000 TTT JD isn't a good idea for someone looking to start a career in law, went to Richmond AT ALL. You couldn't have known all that going in or you would have ran, not walked, away from that TTT.

We like the message (though some of the reasons are silly -- would you not go to Yale if they had no outlets in heir classrooms?), but don't understand YOU.


And that is why none of your posts have been helpful

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North
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby North » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:42 pm

hichvichwoh wrote:Obviously this discredits the advice. Sorry OP, your well-meaning attempt to teach others from your mistake and to prevent them from making the same one is somehow invalid...because you made the mistake in the first place?
hichvichwoh wrote:And that is why none of your posts have been helpful

You're being so sarcastic that it's actually difficult to pick out the point you're trying to make. So... what's your point?

tim.janitor
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby tim.janitor » Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:48 pm

Hey OP, I'm a OL.

I also met some very nice people in admissions, who know my name (the more people who know my name the better obviously).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLKMwkW3gqM

You might connect with that video.

What school are you at now?

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hichvichwoh
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby hichvichwoh » Sat Sep 01, 2012 3:34 pm

North wrote:
hichvichwoh wrote:Obviously this discredits the advice. Sorry OP, your well-meaning attempt to teach others from your mistake and to prevent them from making the same one is somehow invalid...because you made the mistake in the first place?
hichvichwoh wrote:And that is why none of your posts have been helpful

You're being so sarcastic that it's actually difficult to pick out the point you're trying to make. So... what's your point?


I guess I have to simplify it for you. The whole point of this thread is that the OP made a mistake in going to Richmond Law, and is now using his/her experience to warn others not to make the same mistake. Attacking OP's original reasoning for attending Richmond Law serves no purpose.

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North
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby North » Sat Sep 01, 2012 4:53 pm

hichvichwoh wrote:I guess I have to simplify it for you. The whole point of this thread is that the OP made a mistake in going to Richmond Law, and is now using his/her experience to warn others not to make the same mistake. Attacking OP's original reasoning for attending Richmond Law serves no purpose.

Thanks for breaking it down. Sometimes really high-level writing just flies over my head. Knowing what lured OP -- who seems knowledgable about legal hiring -- into making the poor decision to attend Richmond is as valuable to those considering attending Richmond themselves as the post-enrollment information OP provided. OP jumped into a trap. If he told us what convinced him to make that jump, those applicants considering making the same jump for the same reasons could benefit. We have the "after" picture. Adding the "before" picture would further OP's goal. Do you understand? Nobody's attacking anybody, so calm the fuck down.

timbs4339
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby timbs4339 » Sun Sep 02, 2012 10:55 am

OP, had you wound up at the median instead of top 20%, would you have continued to attend Richmond?

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cahwc12
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby cahwc12 » Mon Sep 03, 2012 9:36 am

you should get a group of students from there (especially ones that transferred out if you can) to sue them and try to get them to lose accreditation.

Probably won't ever amount to anything, but it would be great if it did.

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dingbat
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby dingbat » Mon Sep 03, 2012 11:21 am


Skump
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby Skump » Wed Sep 05, 2012 1:26 pm

Of course, this thread's takeaway could basically be generalized to:

Thinking of going to [some school other than]:

1) a T10, or...

2) a school with exceptionally strong regional placement on a nearly full scholarship with no stipulations?

Don't!

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dibs
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby dibs » Mon Oct 08, 2012 12:28 pm

.

je1house
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

Postby je1house » Wed Oct 10, 2012 12:30 am

Current (happy) Richmond Law student here. Let’s take the OP to task on a few of her allegations, shall we?

1) There is no one left in the Career Services office because everyone quit. Even when they actually HAD employees, they did not offer any assistance or advice in obtaining a summer internship, nor did they return phone calls or emails.

Perhaps that’s because you displayed the same entitled attitude this post is drenched in. You aren’t guaranteed a job. Career Services surely had its issues, but I worked with a judge this summer because of their hard work.

2) They ran out of funding and were not able to provide the stipend for government/public interest internships for students as they promised.

They didn’t run out of funding. It sounds like you missed the deadline Career Services set as soon as the stipends were announced.

3) The facilities (classrooms, library, etc.) are inadequate and cannot accommodate the amount of students that have been admitted.

Everyone has a seat in class. Every student has his or her own private carrel. Study tables are always open.

4) There is an incredibly limited number of classes offered, which does not give students the opportunity to explore areas of interest beyond basic substantive law courses.

http://law.richmond.edu/academics/curriculum/index.html Are you sure about that?

Richmond tends to "run out of money". They offer a small stipend for summer internships if the student is working with a government or nonprofit agency. When I was offered a government internship, they had conveniently "run out of funding", and people who just happened to secure internships before I did were able to receive that money for the same exact type of job. So glad my tuition money is being fairly disbursed and is benefiting some students and not others.

That isn’t your tuition money. As you may recall, the school hosted a public interest auction to raise money for students choosing to work in government or public interest jobs. Again, it sounds like you missed the deadline…

If you read my original post, you would know that the school I transferred to does not exhibit any of those negative qualities. Maybe I'm incredibly fortunate, but as far as I've heard, most schools have enough classrooms for their students and don't outsource them to a random undergraduate building. I don't think it's considered a luxury to be able to have an outlet to plug in my laptop when I'm in class - it's not superficial at all to expect that the building isn't so ancient that I might have to handwrite my notes.

Your first world “problem” is completely asinine. If you charge your laptop before class, it’ll last ninety minutes. Most classrooms provide a personal outlet for each seat, so I’m not sure what your complaint is about in the first place.

I also had 60+ classes to choose from at my new institution, as opposed to the 12 or so classes that Richmond offered per semester. Clinic opportunities are incredibly important for a lot of people, as well as student organizations, journals, networking events, etc. If I'm investing so much in my law degree, I would expect to have all these things available to me. I know from first hand experience that not all schools are so disappointing - if you had all the information, why wouldn't you choose a school that gives you far more resources and opportunities?

Have you recently suffered a head injury? A list of active classes this semester from Richmond’s BannerWeb:

1) Corporations
2) International Business Transactions
3) Labor Law
4) Evidence
5) Federal Income Taxation
6) Criminal Procedure
7) Admiralty Law
8) Agency and Partnership
9) Core Commercial Law Concepts
10) Environmental Law
11) Election Law
12) Employment Discrimination Law
13) Employment Law
14) Civil Litigation
15) Advanced Trial Practice
16) Estate and Gift Taxation
17) Taxation/ Non-Corporate Entities
18) Intellectual Property Fundamentals
19) International Business Transactions
20) International Law
21) Labor Law
22) Land Use Planning
23) Products Liability
24) Intellectual Property Law and Policy
25) Remedies
26) Legislative Advocacy
27) Virginia Procedure
28) Business Planning
29) Interviewing and Counseling
30) Negotiation
31) Tax Policy Seminar
32) Sales and Leases
33) Secured Transactions
34) Contract Drafting
35) White Collar Crime
36) Comparative Criminal Procedure
37) Federal Role in Education
38) Public Policy Research and Drafting
39) Transactional Drafting
40) Pre-Trial Drafting
41) Civilian Workers in Warzones
42) Entertainment Law
43) Advanced Family Law Seminar
44) Mergers and Acquisitions
45) Role of Lawyer in Mediation
46) Family Law
47) Animal Law
48) Trademark/ Copyright/ Trade Secrets
49) International Intellectual Property
50) International Environmental Law
51) Patent Law
52) Immigration Law
53) Medical Malpractice
54) John Marshall Scholars Seminar
55) Race, Religion, and the Law
56) Wrongful Conviction Seminar
57) Family Law Clinic
58) Domestic Violence Seminar
59) Copyright Law
60) Lawyering Skills III- Trial Advocacy
61) Professional Responsibility
62) Multiple Research Assistant Positions
63) Multiple Judicial Placements (Including Federal Placements)
64) Children’s Defense Clinic
65) Education Rights Clinic
66) Multiple Civil Placements
67) Multiple Criminal Placements

Hence reasons 1 and 2! IF YOU ATTEND RICHMOND, IT IS NOT LIKELY YOU WILL GET A JOB. Career Services will ignore your attempts to contact them and, in fact, will tell you to waitress or bartend instead of bothering to look for an internship because the "economy is bad". I was in the top 20% of my class, got on an academic journal, competed and secured a position on the Trial Advocacy Board, found a government agency internship on my own and did everything else under the sun to prepare for the job market. THEY WILL NOT SUPPORT YOU, HELP YOU, OR PROVIDE YOU WITH ANY GUIDANCE, no matter how hard you work or what you do.

Please cite statistics supporting your first claim, because I haven’t seen them. Like I said, Career Services wasn’t perfect, but Richmond implemented a newly refocused Career Development Office this fall. The first step Dean Perdue took was hiring Janet Hutchinson, former assistant dean for career services at Emory Law. http://law.richmond.edu/people/faculty/jhutchi2/

You're right - the point of law school is to get a job. THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. If you are considering comparable law schools and Richmond is one of them, DO NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. I feel like I've sufficiently made my point - this was just a well-intended attempt to save others from making the same mistake. If it wasn't well received, then so be it.

Your “well-intended” attempt wasn’t truthful. You said there were twelve classes offered—there are nearly seventy, including the clinics you felt were absent. You said Richmond ran out of money— it looks like you missed a well-advertised deadline to apply for a generous summer stipend that you weren’t entitled to in the first place. You said there isn’t space for our student body, but you had your own private study carrel, a recreation room, the atrium, the student commons, five private study rooms, dozens of quiet library tables, and your pick of any empty classroom to study in.

Richmond is a great school with great opportunities. Over the past year, I've made some of my closest friends and taken on rewarding challenges all thanks to this school. I urge anyone seriously considering Richmond Law to visit campus before making a decision based on this thread.

The OP wasn't happy. Fine. But it isn’t fair to portray the school her former classmates still proudly attend in such a dishonest light. At best, Maryland Law received someone whose arguments lack the precision and attention to detail necessary to practice law.

rad lulz
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Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:53 pm

Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

Postby rad lulz » Wed Oct 10, 2012 3:13 am

je1house wrote:Current (happy) Richmond Law student here. Let’s take the OP to task on a few of her allegations, shall we?

1) There is no one left in the Career Services office because everyone quit. Even when they actually HAD employees, they did not offer any assistance or advice in obtaining a summer internship, nor did they return phone calls or emails.

Perhaps that’s because you displayed the same entitled attitude this post is drenched in. You aren’t guaranteed a job. Career Services surely had its issues, but I worked with a judge this summer because of their hard work.

2) They ran out of funding and were not able to provide the stipend for government/public interest internships for students as they promised.

They didn’t run out of funding. It sounds like you missed the deadline Career Services set as soon as the stipends were announced.

3) The facilities (classrooms, library, etc.) are inadequate and cannot accommodate the amount of students that have been admitted.

Everyone has a seat in class. Every student has his or her own private carrel. Study tables are always open.

4) There is an incredibly limited number of classes offered, which does not give students the opportunity to explore areas of interest beyond basic substantive law courses.

http://law.richmond.edu/academics/curriculum/index.html Are you sure about that?

Richmond tends to "run out of money". They offer a small stipend for summer internships if the student is working with a government or nonprofit agency. When I was offered a government internship, they had conveniently "run out of funding", and people who just happened to secure internships before I did were able to receive that money for the same exact type of job. So glad my tuition money is being fairly disbursed and is benefiting some students and not others.

That isn’t your tuition money. As you may recall, the school hosted a public interest auction to raise money for students choosing to work in government or public interest jobs. Again, it sounds like you missed the deadline…

If you read my original post, you would know that the school I transferred to does not exhibit any of those negative qualities. Maybe I'm incredibly fortunate, but as far as I've heard, most schools have enough classrooms for their students and don't outsource them to a random undergraduate building. I don't think it's considered a luxury to be able to have an outlet to plug in my laptop when I'm in class - it's not superficial at all to expect that the building isn't so ancient that I might have to handwrite my notes.

Your first world “problem” is completely asinine. If you charge your laptop before class, it’ll last ninety minutes. Most classrooms provide a personal outlet for each seat, so I’m not sure what your complaint is about in the first place.

I also had 60+ classes to choose from at my new institution, as opposed to the 12 or so classes that Richmond offered per semester. Clinic opportunities are incredibly important for a lot of people, as well as student organizations, journals, networking events, etc. If I'm investing so much in my law degree, I would expect to have all these things available to me. I know from first hand experience that not all schools are so disappointing - if you had all the information, why wouldn't you choose a school that gives you far more resources and opportunities?

Have you recently suffered a head injury? A list of active classes this semester from Richmond’s BannerWeb:

1) Corporations
2) International Business Transactions
3) Labor Law
4) Evidence
5) Federal Income Taxation
6) Criminal Procedure
7) Admiralty Law
8) Agency and Partnership
9) Core Commercial Law Concepts
10) Environmental Law
11) Election Law
12) Employment Discrimination Law
13) Employment Law
14) Civil Litigation
15) Advanced Trial Practice
16) Estate and Gift Taxation
17) Taxation/ Non-Corporate Entities
18) Intellectual Property Fundamentals
19) International Business Transactions
20) International Law
21) Labor Law
22) Land Use Planning
23) Products Liability
24) Intellectual Property Law and Policy
25) Remedies
26) Legislative Advocacy
27) Virginia Procedure
28) Business Planning
29) Interviewing and Counseling
30) Negotiation
31) Tax Policy Seminar
32) Sales and Leases
33) Secured Transactions
34) Contract Drafting
35) White Collar Crime
36) Comparative Criminal Procedure
37) Federal Role in Education
38) Public Policy Research and Drafting
39) Transactional Drafting
40) Pre-Trial Drafting
41) Civilian Workers in Warzones
42) Entertainment Law
43) Advanced Family Law Seminar
44) Mergers and Acquisitions
45) Role of Lawyer in Mediation
46) Family Law
47) Animal Law
48) Trademark/ Copyright/ Trade Secrets
49) International Intellectual Property
50) International Environmental Law
51) Patent Law
52) Immigration Law
53) Medical Malpractice
54) John Marshall Scholars Seminar
55) Race, Religion, and the Law
56) Wrongful Conviction Seminar
57) Family Law Clinic
58) Domestic Violence Seminar
59) Copyright Law
60) Lawyering Skills III- Trial Advocacy
61) Professional Responsibility
62) Multiple Research Assistant Positions
63) Multiple Judicial Placements (Including Federal Placements)
64) Children’s Defense Clinic
65) Education Rights Clinic
66) Multiple Civil Placements
67) Multiple Criminal Placements

Hence reasons 1 and 2! IF YOU ATTEND RICHMOND, IT IS NOT LIKELY YOU WILL GET A JOB. Career Services will ignore your attempts to contact them and, in fact, will tell you to waitress or bartend instead of bothering to look for an internship because the "economy is bad". I was in the top 20% of my class, got on an academic journal, competed and secured a position on the Trial Advocacy Board, found a government agency internship on my own and did everything else under the sun to prepare for the job market. THEY WILL NOT SUPPORT YOU, HELP YOU, OR PROVIDE YOU WITH ANY GUIDANCE, no matter how hard you work or what you do.

Please cite statistics supporting your first claim, because I haven’t seen them. Like I said, Career Services wasn’t perfect, but Richmond implemented a newly refocused Career Development Office this fall. The first step Dean Perdue took was hiring Janet Hutchinson, former assistant dean for career services at Emory Law. http://law.richmond.edu/people/faculty/jhutchi2/

You're right - the point of law school is to get a job. THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. If you are considering comparable law schools and Richmond is one of them, DO NOT ATTEND RICHMOND LAW. I feel like I've sufficiently made my point - this was just a well-intended attempt to save others from making the same mistake. If it wasn't well received, then so be it.

Your “well-intended” attempt wasn’t truthful. You said there were twelve classes offered—there are nearly seventy, including the clinics you felt were absent. You said Richmond ran out of money— it looks like you missed a well-advertised deadline to apply for a generous summer stipend that you weren’t entitled to in the first place. You said there isn’t space for our student body, but you had your own private study carrel, a recreation room, the atrium, the student commons, five private study rooms, dozens of quiet library tables, and your pick of any empty classroom to study in.

Richmond is a great school with great opportunities. Over the past year, I've made some of my closest friends and taken on rewarding challenges all thanks to this school. I urge anyone seriously considering Richmond Law to visit campus before making a decision based on this thread.

The OP wasn't happy. Fine. But it isn’t fair to portray the school her former classmates still proudly attend in such a dishonest light. At best, Maryland Law received someone whose arguments lack the precision and attention to detail necessary to practice law.

Whatever brah, 60% employment as lawyers, as per LST.

--LinkRemoved--

je1house
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:55 pm

Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

Postby je1house » Wed Oct 10, 2012 9:39 am

Whatever brah, 60% employment as lawyers, as per LST.

--LinkRemoved--


Sixty percent, while admittedly lower than I'd like to see, means most students are getting legal jobs after graduation. With the job market still licking its wounds, even better ranked Virginia schools like William and Mary and George Mason hover between 55-58% employment per LST. While LST's statistics are useful, numbers don't define a school. If you base your decision solely on "rankings" and percentages, you'll undoubtedly have a miserable law school experience.

Just my two cents.

noobishned
Posts: 94
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 2:17 pm

Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

Postby noobishned » Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:27 pm

Thanks for taking the time to write up that post. I am considering UR and, to be honest, OP had me scared.

I don't know why I listened, because, regardless of rankings or LST, people in Richmond love UR Law...

I interned at a fortune 500 in Richmond this summer and they said they only higher UR Law 1Ls as summer interns and they even give them jobs in legal (as lawyers).

All of the professionals that I talked to at coffee meetings (including 2 lawyers from RVA BigLaw) told me they think UR is a fine school and that they regularly higher from UR.

People on this board are blind to the regional placements and regional respect that most schools receive because they put all of the weight on rankings and stats. Admittedly, stats are very telling of the economic opportunities in an area, but like the previous poster said, they are pretty bad in most places (Outside T14).

timbs4339
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

Postby timbs4339 » Thu Oct 11, 2012 7:24 am

je1house wrote:Whatever brah, 60% employment as lawyers, as per LST.

--LinkRemoved--


Sixty percent, while admittedly lower than I'd like to see, means most students are getting legal jobs after graduation. With the job market still licking its wounds, even better ranked Virginia schools like William and Mary and George Mason hover between 55-58% employment per LST. While LST's statistics are useful, numbers don't define a school. If you base your decision solely on "rankings" and percentages, you'll undoubtedly have a miserable law school experience.

Just my two cents.


If you base your law school decision solely on "money" and "debt", you'll also undoubtedly have a miserable law school experience. Doesn't mean you shouldn't base your decision off of that. At 60% FT bar required- not worth it unless you go for free.

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cahwc12
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

Postby cahwc12 » Thu Oct 11, 2012 9:28 am

noobishned wrote:Thanks for taking the time to write up that post. I am considering UR and, to be honest, OP had me scared.

I don't know why I listened, because, regardless of rankings or LST, people in Richmond love UR Law...

I interned at a fortune 500 in Richmond this summer and they said they only higher UR Law 1Ls as summer interns and they even give them jobs in legal (as lawyers).

All of the professionals that I talked to at coffee meetings (including 2 lawyers from RVA BigLaw) told me they think UR is a fine school and that they regularly higher from UR.

People on this board are blind to the regional placements and regional respect that most schools receive because they put all of the weight on rankings and stats. Admittedly, stats are very telling of the economic opportunities in an area, but like the previous poster said, they are pretty bad in most places (Outside T14).


Define "regularly." I'm not trying to jump on the troll train here, but I'm legitimately concerned over people who would read these posts and reconsider Richmond at anything beyond significantly reduced tuition.

According to ABA placement statistics:

RVA 2011 Graduates - 166
Employed at Firms >100 - 12
Employed at firms >500 - 1

How are you defining biglaw and how are they defining it? And how do you define regularly hire? (I assume you meant to write hire rather than higher.) What's regular for the firms seems to be rare for graduates.


And a very key note here in these posts is that neither has indicated having secured any job. Perhaps the latter poster's opinion will change dramatically in another year.

rad lulz
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? Don't.

Postby rad lulz » Thu Oct 11, 2012 10:06 am

je1house wrote:Whatever brah, 60% employment as lawyers, as per LST.

--LinkRemoved--


Sixty percent, while admittedly lower than I'd like to see, means most students are getting legal jobs after graduation. With the job market still licking its wounds, even better ranked Virginia schools like William and Mary and George Mason hover between 55-58% employment per LST. While LST's statistics are useful, numbers don't define a school. If you base your decision solely on "rankings" and percentages, you'll undoubtedly have a miserable law school experience.

Just my two cents.

I never brought up rankings. I see you creating that straw man.

News flash: W&M and GM aren't good ideas either.

Unless you for some reason aren't planning to work after law school, employment stats are the #1 thing you should take into account.

albanach
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Re: Thinking about going to University of Richmond Law? DON'T.

Postby albanach » Thu Oct 11, 2012 10:16 am

HeavenWood wrote:I like to think Penn does pretty well in most of those other categories you mention as well, but just a forewarning, career services staff tend to suck no matter where you go.


Really? At UVA it seems they won't leave you alone unless and until you tell them you have a job lined up.




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