Suggestions for non-patent IP law programs?

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curiousme
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2012 12:25 am

Suggestions for non-patent IP law programs?

Postby curiousme » Sat Jun 16, 2012 2:38 pm

I'm looking for some suggestions on law schools with strong Intellectual Property programs to consider applying to.

Most of the posts I've seen focus on patent law, which is not really what I'm interested in. Where I want to work is with copyright and trademark, particularly in the art/lit fields (preferably with new-media/internet as a component, though the legal aspects of cross-media adaptations fascinates me). So far my method is to cross reference overall ranking with how many courses they list in the areas I'm looking at. Would prefer east coast, as most of the publishing industry in the US is centered around NYC, and DC has the think-tanks, but I'm not ruling anything out geographically. Other than Stanford and Boalt (which have fantastic course-lists), I'm trying to figure what other schools to apply to. Also, though I have been using rankings, I'm not married to T14, (stats: UG GPA 3.84+, waiting on LSAT).

From reading the forums and my own research the following seem to be good options given rank/course options:
Stanford, Boalt, Harvard (fair number of online/cyber law classes), NYU, Columbia, George Washington, Franklin Pierce, Vanderbilt, UVA, Chicago.

Also, considering supplementing IP classes with Entertainment Law and/or Sports Law classes, so some strength in those areas would be a nice bonus, but not required.

2012JayDee
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue May 29, 2012 10:49 pm

Re: Suggestions for non-patent IP law programs?

Postby 2012JayDee » Sat Jun 16, 2012 6:57 pm

curiousme wrote:I'm looking for some suggestions on law schools with strong Intellectual Property programs to consider applying to.

Most of the posts I've seen focus on patent law, which is not really what I'm interested in. Where I want to work is with copyright and trademark, particularly in the art/lit fields (preferably with new-media/internet as a component, though the legal aspects of cross-media adaptations fascinates me). So far my method is to cross reference overall ranking with how many courses they list in the areas I'm looking at. Would prefer east coast, as most of the publishing industry in the US is centered around NYC, and DC has the think-tanks, but I'm not ruling anything out geographically. Other than Stanford and Boalt (which have fantastic course-lists), I'm trying to figure what other schools to apply to. Also, though I have been using rankings, I'm not married to T14, (stats: UG GPA 3.84+, waiting on LSAT).

From reading the forums and my own research the following seem to be good options given rank/course options:
Stanford, Boalt, Harvard (fair number of online/cyber law classes), NYU, Columbia, George Washington, Franklin Pierce, Vanderbilt, UVA, Chicago.

Also, considering supplementing IP classes with Entertainment Law and/or Sports Law classes, so some strength in those areas would be a nice bonus, but not required.


Franklin Pierce probably shouldn't be a consideration if your other options are anything else on the list that you mentioned. I don't care what the brochure says. There's no program in the world that's going to make Franklin Pierce comparable to NYU, Columbia, GW, Vandy, UVA, or Chicago. If none of those schools becomes an option once you get your LSAT score back and Franklin Pierce is your only option then retake the LSAT.

Don't go to any school just because of a published course list. Just about every law school in the country offers a basic intellectual property or Copyright/Trademark, or Entertainment Law, or Sports Law class. Taking 3 or 4 courses in this areas isn't going to help you achieve much and you shouldn't base your admissions decision on classes that may or may not be available when you enroll and may or may not fit into your schedule when you are ready to take them. Course listings are usually just tentative and representative of the classes that have been offered or are normally offered.

If you want to work in soft IP one intro class and then some internships are best. There are a number of entertainment companies in NY that offer internships in their business/legal dept and that dept usually handles the IP stuff. Columbia, NYU, Fordham and Cardozo all have good relationships and lots of contacts with businesses in NYC that do soft IP.

But really, you should just try and get into the best school you can get into and don't focus too much or put too much stock into a few classes. You'll want to take a wide range of courses during law school. As you'll come to find out there are a lot of other things that are important to IP other than the obvious TM and copyright law (i.e., bankruptcy and antitrust).

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rickgrimes69
Posts: 1107
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:56 am

Re: Suggestions for non-patent IP law programs?

Postby rickgrimes69 » Sat Jun 16, 2012 7:04 pm

curiousme wrote:
From reading the forums and my own research the following seem to be good options given rank/course options:
Stanford, Boalt, Harvard (fair number of online/cyber law classes), NYU, Columbia, George Washington, Franklin Pierce, Vanderbilt, UVA, Chicago.


Lol

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JCFindley
Posts: 1283
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2012 1:19 pm

Re: Suggestions for non-patent IP law programs?

Postby JCFindley » Sat Jun 16, 2012 7:15 pm

2012JayDee wrote:
curiousme wrote:I'm looking for some suggestions on law schools with strong Intellectual Property programs to consider applying to.

Most of the posts I've seen focus on patent law, which is not really what I'm interested in. Where I want to work is with copyright and trademark, particularly in the art/lit fields (preferably with new-media/internet as a component, though the legal aspects of cross-media adaptations fascinates me). So far my method is to cross reference overall ranking with how many courses they list in the areas I'm looking at. Would prefer east coast, as most of the publishing industry in the US is centered around NYC, and DC has the think-tanks, but I'm not ruling anything out geographically. Other than Stanford and Boalt (which have fantastic course-lists), I'm trying to figure what other schools to apply to. Also, though I have been using rankings, I'm not married to T14, (stats: UG GPA 3.84+, waiting on LSAT).

From reading the forums and my own research the following seem to be good options given rank/course options:
Stanford, Boalt, Harvard (fair number of online/cyber law classes), NYU, Columbia, George Washington, Franklin Pierce, Vanderbilt, UVA, Chicago.

Also, considering supplementing IP classes with Entertainment Law and/or Sports Law classes, so some strength in those areas would be a nice bonus, but not required.


Franklin Pierce probably shouldn't be a consideration if your other options are anything else on the list that you mentioned. I don't care what the brochure says. There's no program in the world that's going to make Franklin Pierce comparable to NYU, Columbia, GW, Vandy, UVA, or Chicago. If none of those schools becomes an option once you get your LSAT score back and Franklin Pierce is your only option then retake the LSAT.

Don't go to any school just because of a published course list. Just about every law school in the country offers a basic intellectual property or Copyright/Trademark, or Entertainment Law, or Sports Law class. Taking 3 or 4 courses in this areas isn't going to help you achieve much and you shouldn't base your admissions decision on classes that may or may not be available when you enroll and may or may not fit into your schedule when you are ready to take them. Course listings are usually just tentative and representative of the classes that have been offered or are normally offered.

If you want to work in soft IP one intro class and then some internships are best. There are a number of entertainment companies in NY that offer internships in their business/legal dept and that dept usually handles the IP stuff. Columbia, NYU, Fordham and Cardozo all have good relationships and lots of contacts with businesses in NYC that do soft IP.

But really, you should just try and get into the best school you can get into and don't focus too much or put too much stock into a few classes. You'll want to take a wide range of courses during law school. As you'll come to find out there are a lot of other things that are important to IP other than the obvious TM and copyright law (i.e., bankruptcy and antitrust).


TCR

I am interested in IP as well, both the TM/Copyright stuff and patent actually. My choice was Fordham but the decision came down to the school as a whole and not just their IP program.

PolySuyGuy
Posts: 441
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2012 11:59 pm

Re: Suggestions for non-patent IP law programs?

Postby PolySuyGuy » Sat Jul 21, 2012 7:06 pm

curiousme wrote:I'm looking for some suggestions on law schools with strong Intellectual Property programs to consider applying to.

Most of the posts I've seen focus on patent law, which is not really what I'm interested in. Where I want to work is with copyright and trademark, particularly in the art/lit fields (preferably with new-media/internet as a component, though the legal aspects of cross-media adaptations fascinates me). So far my method is to cross reference overall ranking with how many courses they list in the areas I'm looking at. Would prefer east coast, as most of the publishing industry in the US is centered around NYC, and DC has the think-tanks, but I'm not ruling anything out geographically. Other than Stanford and Boalt (which have fantastic course-lists), I'm trying to figure what other schools to apply to. Also, though I have been using rankings, I'm not married to T14, (stats: UG GPA 3.84+, waiting on LSAT).

From reading the forums and my own research the following seem to be good options given rank/course options:
Stanford, Boalt, Harvard (fair number of online/cyber law classes), NYU, Columbia, George Washington, Franklin Pierce, Vanderbilt, UVA, Chicago.

Also, considering supplementing IP classes with Entertainment Law and/or Sports Law classes, so some strength in those areas would be a nice bonus, but not required.


The Hollywood Reporter has all you need. :lol:




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