Cal or SLS for patent law

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markman
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 12:48 am

Re: Cal or SLS for patent law

Postby markman » Sun May 20, 2012 2:42 pm

jim-green wrote:
dixiecupdrinking wrote:Why are you going?
Combine my technical background with a law degree will give me a boost in the rat race I think, learning a new subject and being in class again, potentially more $$ when I graduate over the next 20 years (my current raises are only cost-of-living if any, move out of this small town we are in, get into a job that cannot be outsourced as easily as engineering, and maybe make a difference to my parent's home country (in the 3rd world). Some of these reasons probably are not good or sound silly, I mean not worth taking such a financial hit for.

First, rat race. You're going from one rat race to another. And the rats in the patent law rat race are vicious. Law school ain't about learning unless you're at Yale Law. It's about graduating in the top 10-25% if you're at a t14 and in the top 5% everywhere else.

Second, money. More $$ when you graduate? What are you talking about? Doing what? Making partner? Do you know that 1-4% of law graduates make partner? Do you know how deep you'll be in debt? And if you have $250k lying around, do you realize how much that money could compound into over 40 years versus blowing it all on a JD?

Third, your aim at revolutionizing a third-world country (BRIC, let me guess - India?). See my above post. Law school is the dumbest idea toward this goal. Why the fudge are you going to try and learn about the latest developments in the law of prosecution history disclaimer and how that is different from estoppel, as one step on your path toward saving a third-world country? Spare us and yourself this garbage diploma you're pursuing and go do what you want now.

Don't save up sex for old age. Go do that BRIC-crap now.

One last comment. You are not special as an engineer with a JD. There are TONS of those. And you won't be any more special coming from Yale. The value-added of your diploma, you will find, will fade away dramatically after your first job. Then, it's about working 60-hour weeks, kissing the right asses, getting lucky, and not burning out - all while knowing that there's only so long you can linger at a firm without getting the boot.

jim-green
Posts: 808
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:55 pm

Re: Cal or SLS for patent law

Postby jim-green » Sun May 20, 2012 2:49 pm

markman wrote:One last comment. You are not special as an engineer with a JD. There are TONS of those. And you won't be any more special coming from Yale. The value-added of your diploma, you will find, will fade away dramatically after your first job. Then, it's about working 60-hour weeks, kissing the right asses, getting lucky, and not burning out - all while knowing that there's only so long you can linger at a firm without getting the boot.
This is good advice. I needed to hear this, thanks.

markman
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 12:48 am

Re: Cal or SLS for patent law

Postby markman » Sun May 20, 2012 2:59 pm

jim-green wrote:
markman wrote:One last comment. You are not special as an engineer with a JD. There are TONS of those. And you won't be any more special coming from Yale. The value-added of your diploma, you will find, will fade away dramatically after your first job. Then, it's about working 60-hour weeks, kissing the right asses, getting lucky, and not burning out - all while knowing that there's only so long you can linger at a firm without getting the boot.
This is good advice. I needed to hear this, thanks.


No problem. And trust me, there are TONS of top-flight engineers with JDs from Harvard and Yale in the patent bar. You will not be a special snowflake by any means. And now that patents have had a 10-year run of being "hot" - there will be TONS more. The last reason you need to go to law school is to become more "competitive" for certain jobs.

Don't believe me? Martindale it.

jim-green
Posts: 808
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:55 pm

Re: Cal or SLS for patent law

Postby jim-green » Sun May 20, 2012 4:52 pm

markman wrote:No problem. And trust me, there are TONS of top-flight engineers with JDs from Harvard and Yale in the patent bar. You will not be a special snowflake by any means. And now that patents have had a 10-year run of being "hot" - there will be TONS more. The last reason you need to go to law school is to become more "competitive" for certain jobs. Don't believe me? Martindale it.
Martindale? Do any 3Ls work part-time? Could I manage classes as well as work part-time in 3L doing, say, patent prosecution for a firm? How much would this pay?

markman
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 12:48 am

Re: Cal or SLS for patent law

Postby markman » Mon May 21, 2012 12:05 am

jim-green wrote:
markman wrote:No problem. And trust me, there are TONS of top-flight engineers with JDs from Harvard and Yale in the patent bar. You will not be a special snowflake by any means. And now that patents have had a 10-year run of being "hot" - there will be TONS more. The last reason you need to go to law school is to become more "competitive" for certain jobs. Don't believe me? Martindale it.
Martindale? Do any 3Ls work part-time? Could I manage classes as well as work part-time in 3L doing, say, patent prosecution for a firm? How much would this pay?

Why would you have a need to manage 3L classes? Again, your questions are all over the place. Nobody cares about 3L grades.
Yes, you can work part-time whenever you feel like it. Why is that even relevant to Cal versus SLS?
I'm beginning to think you're a flame, but I'll keep playing.

jim-green
Posts: 808
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:55 pm

Re: Cal or SLS for patent law

Postby jim-green » Mon May 21, 2012 8:22 am

markman wrote:Why would you have a need to manage 3L classes? Again, your questions are all over the place. Nobody cares about 3L grades. Yes, you can work part-time whenever you feel like it. Why is that even relevant to Cal versus SLS?
I'm beginning to think you're a flame, but I'll keep playing.
What is Martindale?
The reason I am asking about how intense 3L classes are is to ask whether I can work part-time, say in patent prosecution in SV, and make some $$$ to reduce my loans and financial hit. Simple. And how much could I hope to make? It is not relevant to Cal v. SLS. I have given up on SLS from the advice in the earlier posts in this thread. I'm just calculating my overall financial hit to decide, "law school or not?".

jim-green
Posts: 808
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:55 pm

Re: Cal or SLS for patent law

Postby jim-green » Tue May 22, 2012 1:45 pm

Any further comments? I have a couple other questions as well, but perhaps this is the wrong thread or forum?




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