Pitt, W&L, Lewis and Clark

(Rankings, Profiles, Tuition, Student Life, . . . )
HeavenWood
Posts: 2915
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 6:42 pm

Re: Pitt, W&L, Lewis and Clark

Postby HeavenWood » Tue Mar 27, 2012 2:19 pm

1776 wrote:
flem wrote:
1776 wrote:
My question was more like this: I want to move to Oregon. Is it better to go to law school there now, or go to Pitt, work, then try to move?


Then I'd go to L&C if it's cheap enough.

Or move out there now and reapply to Oregon as a resident.

Pitt will be you nowhere outside of Pittsburgh.

Outside of the T14, go to where you want to work.


Is it reasonable to think once you have several years of work experience, like in other fields, that matters more than the school? As in, if I have a solid job for 5-9 years, would that be enough to move to a different city?

It can be, but you're counting on a number of conditionals here. If Oregon is what you really want, I'd work like mad to establish ties there. Moving out there and working for a year or two before starting law school could do the trick, especially since (like tflem said) you could establish residency

User avatar
flem
Posts: 12949
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:44 pm

Re: Pitt, W&L, Lewis and Clark

Postby flem » Tue Mar 27, 2012 2:54 pm

1776 wrote:
flem wrote:
1776 wrote:
My question was more like this: I want to move to Oregon. Is it better to go to law school there now, or go to Pitt, work, then try to move?


Then I'd go to L&C if it's cheap enough.

Or move out there now and reapply to Oregon as a resident.

Pitt will be you nowhere outside of Pittsburgh.

Outside of the T14, go to where you want to work.


Is it reasonable to think once you have several years of work experience, like in other fields, that matters more than the school? As in, if I have a solid job for 5-9 years, would that be enough to move to a different city?


You're going to build a client base and reputation in one area, so not really.

User avatar
1776
Posts: 243
Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 3:49 pm

Re: Pitt, W&L, Lewis and Clark

Postby 1776 » Tue Mar 27, 2012 10:38 pm

flem wrote:
1776 wrote:
flem wrote:
1776 wrote:
My question was more like this: I want to move to Oregon. Is it better to go to law school there now, or go to Pitt, work, then try to move?


Then I'd go to L&C if it's cheap enough.

Or move out there now and reapply to Oregon as a resident.

Pitt will be you nowhere outside of Pittsburgh.

Outside of the T14, go to where you want to work.


Is it reasonable to think once you have several years of work experience, like in other fields, that matters more than the school? As in, if I have a solid job for 5-9 years, would that be enough to move to a different city?


You're going to build a client base and reputation in one area, so not really.


I see a lot of different fields in which people completely rellocate after a couple of years of good experience. They get recruited, new job openings, etc. Is law not like that? Are people stuck in one city their entire career?

User avatar
romothesavior
Posts: 14772
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 4:29 pm

Re: Pitt, W&L, Lewis and Clark

Postby romothesavior » Tue Mar 27, 2012 10:43 pm

1776 wrote:I see a lot of different fields in which people completely rellocate after a couple of years of good experience. They get recruited, new job openings, etc. Is law not like that? Are people stuck in one city their entire career?

You're not "stuck." You could move if the opportunity was right, particularly if it was private practice ---> in-house, moving among public interest employers or government agencies, etc. But jumping from firm to firm isn't nearly as easy. You build a reputation, build a client base, become familiar with local rules of practice, etc. and that makes moving a more difficult task.

User avatar
1776
Posts: 243
Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 3:49 pm

Re: Pitt, W&L, Lewis and Clark

Postby 1776 » Tue Mar 27, 2012 10:53 pm

romothesavior wrote:
1776 wrote:I see a lot of different fields in which people completely rellocate after a couple of years of good experience. They get recruited, new job openings, etc. Is law not like that? Are people stuck in one city their entire career?

You're not "stuck." You could move if the opportunity was right, particularly if it was private practice ---> in-house, moving among public interest employers or government agencies, etc. But jumping from firm to firm isn't nearly as easy. You build a reputation, build a client base, become familiar with local rules of practice, etc. and that makes moving a more difficult task.


I'm interested in PI and gov work. I know gov agencies find openings elsewhere regularly.




Return to “Choosing a Law School”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests