Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

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Ernesto3298
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Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 3:55 pm

Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby Ernesto3298 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 4:59 pm

I recently was offered admission (and a 50% tuition scholarship) to the Stetson University College of Law. One particular program that has drawn me to the University is its dual JD/Grado en Derecho program in which I would earn both an American Law degree and a European Law Degree from the University of Granada, Spain in four years. I've found this program to be an amazing opportunity considering I am completely fluent/able to write professionally in both English and Spanish and am interested in international law.

What are you thoughts and opinions on the "marketability" of having both of these degrees and the opportunities that it could provide me in the future?

P.S.
-The scholarship covers tuition in both Granada and Stetson.
-Although Stetson is not ranked very high, the UdeG has an exceptionally ranked law program.
-I would be open to practicing law in Europe, but would prefer to stay in the U.S.

iowalum
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Re: Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby iowalum » Fri Mar 02, 2012 5:14 pm

First I'd say try to negotiate your scholarship with Stetson. I see pros and cons here: this would be a good opportunity if you are interested in working in immigration law or working in Spain (which is hard if you're an American, I'm sure you know), or if you can find a firm/in-house-legal with a corporation that has close relations with Spain (think Acciona, for one, a wind company in Iowa that has its main offices in Spain) - this might really set you apart. On the other hand, Stetson isn't ranked well, like you said, and if you aren't able to find a job that is this specific you might just end up with a lot of debt.

But, if you can get your scholly up a little and because you already have the Spanish fluency this sounds like a cool opportunity.

rad lulz
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Re: Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby rad lulz » Fri Mar 02, 2012 5:54 pm

,.
Last edited by rad lulz on Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Ernesto3298
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby Ernesto3298 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 6:22 pm

Also it's not a great option if you want to work in the central FL area either. Basically, don't go to Stetson.


@rad,

Did you or someone you know go to Stetson? Where are you getting this information from?

...and by international law I mean immigration law, if you want specifics.

rad lulz
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Re: Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby rad lulz » Fri Mar 02, 2012 6:38 pm

,
Last edited by rad lulz on Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Ernesto3298
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Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby Ernesto3298 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 6:54 pm

I see.

I appreciate your input.

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dingbat
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Re: Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby dingbat » Fri Mar 02, 2012 7:51 pm

Ernesto3298 wrote:I recently was offered admission (and a 50% tuition scholarship) to the Stetson University College of Law. One particular program that has drawn me to the University is its dual JD/Grado en Derecho program in which I would earn both an American Law degree and a European Law Degree from the University of Granada, Spain in four years. I've found this program to be an amazing opportunity considering I am completely fluent/able to write professionally in both English and Spanish and am interested in international law.

What are you thoughts and opinions on the "marketability" of having both of these degrees and the opportunities that it could provide me in the future?

P.S.
-The scholarship covers tuition in both Granada and Stetson.
-Although Stetson is not ranked very high, the UdeG has an exceptionally ranked law program.
-I would be open to practicing law in Europe, but would prefer to stay in the U.S.


I don't know about spain, but most european countries require lawyers to apprentice - a degree doesn't make you a lawyer.
Over here, having both a european and US law degree might help you stand out in a crowded market, but it's unlikely to be a big boost. Firms don't hire new grads to do that.
Law firms do occasionally send lawyers to another country for extra experience, but normally that's after you've been practicing for a few years (and proven that you're worth that kind of investment).

Note that I know a few european lawyers who've been sent to the U.S. by their firm for a year, but I haven't heard the other way around (could be lack of exposure on my part)
The people I know who did that, had been working on international matters for several years and were sent to the US to build on that experience, so they could become the firms' experts for dealing with American lawyers (and legal issues)
It was not so they could practice in the other country.

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dingbat
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Re: Dual American and European Law Degree? Your thoughts.

Postby dingbat » Fri Mar 02, 2012 7:53 pm

rad lulz wrote:
Ernesto3298 wrote:by international law I mean immigration law, if you want specifics.


Dual degree is DEFINITELY not necessary or helpful for immigration.


Seconded. Immigration law only relates to the country someone is emigrating to, not the country they are leaving (except for certain nationality laws)




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