Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby 20130312 » Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:36 pm

Mr. Somebody wrote:Why is re-taking not an option? These schools are not worth going to.

iceicebaby wrote:Please no generic "retake" answers.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby wannabejag » Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:38 pm

Join the NJ National Guard and then Rutgers becomes FREE.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby 20130312 » Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:40 pm

wannabejag wrote:Join the NJ National Guard and then Rutgers becomes FREE.


Also, possibly Afghanistan

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby wannabejag » Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:42 pm

InGoodFaith wrote:
wannabejag wrote:Join the NJ National Guard and then Rutgers becomes FREE.


Also, possibly Afghanistan


There are ways to ensure that doesn't happen while you are in school. And Afghanistan really isn't that bad if you are in a support job.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby get it to x » Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:42 pm

Nelson wrote:
get it to x wrote:Recent RU grad (with gainful employment) here.


Thanks for the info.

Are you working for a small firm or govt.? I'm assuming you have fairly limited debt. Would you say law school was worth it/would you do it again the same way?


Nope, I'm in a private civil litigation practice at a mid-sized firm. My debt is not 6 figures, but it's enough. The debt issue, in my opinion, isn't as big of a deal for an RU grad as it is elsewhere at other public institutions and certainly private ones who offer the same options at twice the price (Fordham is, in my opinion, the most dangerous option you can chose in the NY market w/o a scholarship because if you're below the top 1/3 your options are good as a middle of the road RU student who is paying half the tuition you do.) $22,000 a year plus living expenses is about as good as you're going to get and that's without a scholarship. My debt is manageable (below but not far from 6 figures) because I was able to pay some of it off from my savings, but it's still a concern. It was a particular concern when you're having trouble finding a paying 2L summer job etc., but once/if you get something along the line you can construct your life around finding a balance between living and paying it off. But I wanted to be an attorney and knew about what my options would be coming out of Rutgers and things bounced my way with a bit of luck.

I wouldn't pay anything to do 1L again. Hated it and the feelings were probably mutual. 2L and 3L were different stories because I was taking the courses I wanted to and found an area that I liked and was good at. And I was more involved with working for judges, etc. Plus you actually know what you're doing relatively. When you actually start to practice and someone hands you a case file you won't know what to do with it (that's why we're probably better off ditching the case-method approach and going back to an actual apprentice model of legal education but I'll get off my soapbox). Overall, no I wouldn't do it again. Law school is an incredibly childish enterprise. You're a graduate student, but you have to attend a certain amount of classes or you won't be able to sit for the exam. (I'm not advocating massively cutting class because I'm the one paying to learn, but life happens, job/intern interviews happen, and you shouldn't be stressed out even more whether or not you've used up your quota of classes that will get the administration on your ass.) And to tell you the truth a good portion of your classmates are childish in different ways (gunners, self-entitlement/arrogance, lack of professionalism, etc.) Now some of that bleeds over into practice, but I've found my colleagues to be incredibly mature and professional which was better than some of my classmates and professors. It's just a different world for three years. Whether you're good at it or not doesn't mean that you will be a great or poor attorney.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby 20130312 » Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:48 pm

Poster above me: did you go to Rutgers straight from undergrad or did you get some work experience first?

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Wed Jan 18, 2012 2:55 pm

get it to x wrote:
Nelson wrote:
get it to x wrote:Recent RU grad (with gainful employment) here.


Thanks for the info.

Are you working for a small firm or govt.? I'm assuming you have fairly limited debt. Would you say law school was worth it/would you do it again the same way?


Nope, I'm in a private civil litigation practice at a mid-sized firm. My debt is not 6 figures, but it's enough. The debt issue, in my opinion, isn't as big of a deal for an RU grad as it is elsewhere at other public institutions and certainly private ones who offer the same options at twice the price (Fordham is, in my opinion, the most dangerous option you can chose in the NY market w/o a scholarship because if you're below the top 1/3 your options are good as a middle of the road RU student who is paying half the tuition you do.) $22,000 a year plus living expenses is about as good as you're going to get and that's without a scholarship. My debt is manageable (below but not far from 6 figures) because I was able to pay some of it off from my savings, but it's still a concern. It was a particular concern when you're having trouble finding a paying 2L summer job etc., but once/if you get something along the line you can construct your life around finding a balance between living and paying it off. But I wanted to be an attorney and knew about what my options would be coming out of Rutgers and things bounced my way with a bit of luck.

I wouldn't pay anything to do 1L again. Hated it and the feelings were probably mutual. 2L and 3L were different stories because I was taking the courses I wanted to and found an area that I liked and was good at. And I was more involved with working for judges, etc. Plus you actually know what you're doing relatively. When you actually start to practice and someone hands you a case file you won't know what to do with it (that's why we're probably better off ditching the case-method approach and going back to an actual apprentice model of legal education but I'll get off my soapbox). Overall, no I wouldn't do it again. Law school is an incredibly childish enterprise. You're a graduate student, but you have to attend a certain amount of classes or you won't be able to sit for the exam. (I'm not advocating massively cutting class because I'm the one paying to learn, but life happens, job/intern interviews happen, and you shouldn't be stressed out even more whether or not you've used up your quota of classes that will get the administration on your ass.) And to tell you the truth a good portion of your classmates are childish in different ways (gunners, self-entitlement/arrogance, lack of professionalism, etc.) Now some of that bleeds over into practice, but I've found my colleagues to be incredibly mature and professional which was better than some of my classmates and professors. It's just a different world for three years. Whether you're good at it or not doesn't mean that you will be a great or poor attorney.


Hey, thanks for all of the feedback!!! I think Rutgers is probably my choice between the two, I just don't think I can gamble with that 50% stip, let alone pay 3 years at Seton Hall which would cover 4 years at Rutgers, even with the scholly. Basically I pray I get into better schools, but I'm honestly not that distraught if I don't.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby 20130312 » Wed Jan 18, 2012 3:36 pm

iceicebaby wrote:
InGoodFaith wrote:Put it this way: there's a 50% chance you will lose your scholarship. If we wanted to do a decision tree economic analysis thingy, that knocks your scholarship down to $7500 a year [.5*15000+(1-.5)*0]. So total amounts would look more like this:

Rutgers = $66k
Seton Hall = $108k

For schools with similar job prospects, that is a scary thing.


Yeah, that makes total sense. The 50% stipulation is tough. I would never go to Seton Hall at sticker right now, so I suppose the same should be true if there is the chance that I have to. Rutgers looks a lot better to me knowing that I can get all three years at the in-state tuition rate.


Revising my numbers, forgot that the first $15,000 is guaranteed.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby get it to x » Wed Jan 18, 2012 3:52 pm

InGoodFaith wrote:Poster above me: did you go to Rutgers straight from undergrad or did you get some work experience first?


I worked for four years between undergraduate/graduate school and law school. I wasn't a stock broker pulling in tons of cash, but I was able to put about $10,000-$12,000 a year with an eye towards putting it towards my J.D. I'm very particular of how I live (I don't like roommates so a 1br was necessary and like some space in a relatively safe area) so I knew that I would need the money to put towards rent and tuition. Again, the amount of debt you get into is partially in your hands depending on how much you want to pay for rent, etc. I knew classmates who took vacations over break to very nice tropical climates and were paying for it on their own somehow. I couldn't do it financially and wouldn't use my federal loans to subsidize a vacation that I basically couldn't afford to go on. You don't have to live frugally, but I would recommend simplicity for the next three years. Cook your own meals (dining out and fast food are huge expenses), get basic cable (some law school friends had those packages with every premium channel), avoid vacations unless someone else (ie. your parents) are flipping the bill) and stay away from impulse buying for stuff you truly don't need.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Wed Jan 18, 2012 4:04 pm

get it to x wrote:
InGoodFaith wrote:Poster above me: did you go to Rutgers straight from undergrad or did you get some work experience first?


I worked for four years between undergraduate/graduate school and law school. I wasn't a stock broker pulling in tons of cash, but I was able to put about $10,000-$12,000 a year with an eye towards putting it towards my J.D. I'm very particular of how I live (I don't like roommates so a 1br was necessary and like some space in a relatively safe area) so I knew that I would need the money to put towards rent and tuition. Again, the amount of debt you get into is partially in your hands depending on how much you want to pay for rent, etc. I knew classmates who took vacations over break to very nice tropical climates and were paying for it on their own somehow. I couldn't do it financially and wouldn't use my federal loans to subsidize a vacation that I basically couldn't afford to go on. You don't have to live frugally, but I would recommend simplicity for the next three years. Cook your own meals (dining out is a huge expense), get basic cable (some law school friends had those packages with every premium channel), avoid vacations unless someone else (ie. your parents) are flipping the bill) and stay away from impulse buying for stuff you truly don't need.


I like the cut of your jib. I have worked the past 3 years as a paralegal (FML) since I graduated college, but sadly I didn't really save all that much because of the things you mentioned in your last sentence (impulse buying, rent/living in NYC, expensive vacations). I'm glad I did that though because I got it out of my system and would welcome calming down a bit while I'm at law school, especially when I am begging my parents to pay/borrowing the money for it.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby romothesavior » Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:50 pm

These schools are dumps. Don't go.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Thu Jan 19, 2012 3:20 pm

romothesavior wrote:These schools are dumps. Don't go.


What schools at that range would you consider to not be dumps?

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby romothesavior » Fri Jan 20, 2012 1:40 pm

iceicebaby wrote:
romothesavior wrote:These schools are dumps. Don't go.


What schools at that range would you consider to not be dumps?

In this range, I'd either go to school for free or not go at all. Even T20-30 schools are risky investments these days (I know, I go to one). I wouldn't even advise anyone to go to my T20 without a huge scholarship. You think I would advise going to Seton Hall? I would never pay a dime in tuition to go to a school like these They are awful schools with awful job prospects and they (especially Seton Hall) are way too expensive. Seriously, either retake the LSAT and get a big scholarship to a high ranked school, don't go to law school, or ignore this advice and end up debt pwned.

Some light reading:

http://www.xoxohth.com/thread.php?thread_id=1318472&mc=1&forum_id=2

http://T14 Paradise.blogspot.com/2010/04/call-plumber-seton-hall-university.html

Other schools in this range? Being sued for fraud. http://abovethelaw.com/2011/10/fifteen-more-law-schools-to-be-hit-with-class-action-lawsuits-over-post-grad-employment-rates/

--LinkRemoved--

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:05 pm

Okay well enough of that. I understand the sentiments about law school being a risk for many people. I have worked a good couple of years at law firms and understand the fear associated with the changing legal field. Truth is, these fears exist no matter what you do. What do people suggest someone like myself do when they don't score well on a test that holds no subjective bearing on your ability to become a good lawyer? Go be a mechanic? Listen plenty of people do well from these schools just as plenty of people don't do well. It's really up to me to make most of my opportunities. The fact is that if you are top25% at these schools, you will do just fine. Getting off my soapbox now...

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby romothesavior » Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:20 pm

So a 1/4 chance you can go work for the same pay you could make now, and it only costs you $150,000! Where do I sign up?

I would actually be interested in seeing some sort of mathematical model comparing the investment in law school versus the investment in betting at a roulette table. I would be surprised if a $150,000 investment in Settton Hall was better than betting $150,000 on black.

You can write me and everyone else on this site who is actually in law school and knows 100000x more than you about it, or you can just dive into some shitty law school, spend your money like a sucker, and enjoy carpetbombing little insurance defense firms in Jersey with your resume (along with the hundreds of other applicants) for the chance to make $35,000 at 60+ hours a week. The stats and the information is out there, and TLS has told you how things are, so when you are among the tens of thousands of un- and underemployed law grads in a few years, you can't say you weren't warned.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby 2LT_CPG » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:45 pm

The NJ National Guard isn't deploying anywhere anytime soon. Want an easy way to avoid debt? Enlist as a PVT in the NJARNG and take advantage of that state's ridiculously awesome tuition waiver and go to Rutgers Newark or Rutgers Camden.

I'm an NYARNG officer. Trust me. This isn't 2005. The Guard, and to a larger extent, the entire Army, is deploying sparingly now that Iraq is done and Afg is winding down. You'll do drill and two weeks in the summer, maybe a hurricane call-up. Free law school. The get out after four years. You won't even have to take promotion to SGT so you won't have any responsibilities.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby bobbyh1919 » Sat Jan 21, 2012 2:23 pm

iceicebaby wrote:Okay well enough of that. I understand the sentiments about law school being a risk for many people. I have worked a good couple of years at law firms and understand the fear associated with the changing legal field. Truth is, these fears exist no matter what you do. What do people suggest someone like myself do when they don't score well on a test that holds no subjective bearing on your ability to become a good lawyer? Go be a mechanic? Listen plenty of people do well from these schools just as plenty of people don't do well. It's really up to me to make most of my opportunities. The fact is that if you are top25% at these schools, you will do just fine. Getting off my soapbox now...


It's not that a poor LSAT score necessarily means you can't be a great lawyer. I believe the idea is that the score only allows you to get into schools with questionable job prospects. If you do indeed get top 25 % at either of these schools, you'll most likely be fine. But, again, 100% of students will be aiming for the top 25 %, and 75 % will fail. That's all romo is really saying. Your margin for error is very thin attending these schools will anything less than a large (and secure) scholarship.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Mon Jan 23, 2012 11:32 am

bobbyh1919 wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:Okay well enough of that. I understand the sentiments about law school being a risk for many people. I have worked a good couple of years at law firms and understand the fear associated with the changing legal field. Truth is, these fears exist no matter what you do. What do people suggest someone like myself do when they don't score well on a test that holds no subjective bearing on your ability to become a good lawyer? Go be a mechanic? Listen plenty of people do well from these schools just as plenty of people don't do well. It's really up to me to make most of my opportunities. The fact is that if you are top25% at these schools, you will do just fine. Getting off my soapbox now...


It's not that a poor LSAT score necessarily means you can't be a great lawyer. I believe the idea is that the score only allows you to get into schools with questionable job prospects. If you do indeed get top 25 % at either of these schools, you'll most likely be fine. But, again, 100% of students will be aiming for the top 25 %, and 75 % will fail. That's all romo is really saying. Your margin for error is very thin attending these schools will anything less than a large (and secure) scholarship.


Point taken. I guess I just don't really see the point in giving up because you're scared of what could go wrong instead of striving for what could go right. The fact is that I'm not as debt-adverse nor as desperate for cash as many 0L's might be (I'm lucky to have family that can help me out with tuition). There is the one school of thought to go to whatever school is ranked the best that you get into regardless of scholarship awards or not. There is another school of thought to take the money and run at any of these schools, even if it means going to a lower ranked TT. I'm somewhere in between and still wonder if Seton Hall is worth the extra $24,000 or not for being a higher ranked school as well as nicer than Rutgers-Newark. It also is ranked higher in the NLJ's list of Go-To schools. Still, I don't know completely which would be better. I suppose the Top 50% stip is a tough pill to swallow because it can backfire in my second or third year, which is why hedging my bets with Rutgers might be much better.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby Mr. Somebody » Mon Jan 23, 2012 11:50 am

iceicebaby wrote:
bobbyh1919 wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:Okay well enough of that. I understand the sentiments about law school being a risk for many people. I have worked a good couple of years at law firms and understand the fear associated with the changing legal field. Truth is, these fears exist no matter what you do. What do people suggest someone like myself do when they don't score well on a test that holds no subjective bearing on your ability to become a good lawyer? Go be a mechanic? Listen plenty of people do well from these schools just as plenty of people don't do well. It's really up to me to make most of my opportunities. The fact is that if you are top25% at these schools, you will do just fine. Getting off my soapbox now...


It's not that a poor LSAT score necessarily means you can't be a great lawyer. I believe the idea is that the score only allows you to get into schools with questionable job prospects. If you do indeed get top 25 % at either of these schools, you'll most likely be fine. But, again, 100% of students will be aiming for the top 25 %, and 75 % will fail. That's all romo is really saying. Your margin for error is very thin attending these schools will anything less than a large (and secure) scholarship.


Point taken. I guess I just don't really see the point in giving up because you're scared of what could go wrong instead of striving for what could go right. The fact is that I'm not as debt-adverse nor as desperate for cash as many 0L's might be (I'm lucky to have family that can help me out with tuition). There is the one school of thought to go to whatever school is ranked the best that you get into regardless of scholarship awards or not. There is another school of thought to take the money and run at any of these schools, even if it means going to a lower ranked TT. I'm somewhere in between and still wonder if Seton Hall is worth the extra $24,000 or not for being a higher ranked school as well as nicer than Rutgers-Newark. It also is ranked higher in the NLJ's list of Go-To schools. Still, I don't know completely which would be better. I suppose the Top 50% stip is a tough pill to swallow because it can backfire in my second or third year, which is why hedging my bets with Rutgers might be much better.


Nobody is telling you to give up. It seems you are the one giving up when it comes to your LSAT score....

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:04 pm

Mr. Somebody wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:
bobbyh1919 wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:Okay well enough of that. I understand the sentiments about law school being a risk for many people. I have worked a good couple of years at law firms and understand the fear associated with the changing legal field. Truth is, these fears exist no matter what you do. What do people suggest someone like myself do when they don't score well on a test that holds no subjective bearing on your ability to become a good lawyer? Go be a mechanic? Listen plenty of people do well from these schools just as plenty of people don't do well. It's really up to me to make most of my opportunities. The fact is that if you are top25% at these schools, you will do just fine. Getting off my soapbox now...


It's not that a poor LSAT score necessarily means you can't be a great lawyer. I believe the idea is that the score only allows you to get into schools with questionable job prospects. If you do indeed get top 25 % at either of these schools, you'll most likely be fine. But, again, 100% of students will be aiming for the top 25 %, and 75 % will fail. That's all romo is really saying. Your margin for error is very thin attending these schools will anything less than a large (and secure) scholarship.


Point taken. I guess I just don't really see the point in giving up because you're scared of what could go wrong instead of striving for what could go right. The fact is that I'm not as debt-adverse nor as desperate for cash as many 0L's might be (I'm lucky to have family that can help me out with tuition). There is the one school of thought to go to whatever school is ranked the best that you get into regardless of scholarship awards or not. There is another school of thought to take the money and run at any of these schools, even if it means going to a lower ranked TT. I'm somewhere in between and still wonder if Seton Hall is worth the extra $24,000 or not for being a higher ranked school as well as nicer than Rutgers-Newark. It also is ranked higher in the NLJ's list of Go-To schools. Still, I don't know completely which would be better. I suppose the Top 50% stip is a tough pill to swallow because it can backfire in my second or third year, which is why hedging my bets with Rutgers might be much better.


Nobody is telling you to give up. It seems you are the one giving up when it comes to your LSAT score....


Well I'm not some kid in college or some recent graduate living at home with nothing but time for studying for the LSAT. I work a full-time paralegal job and just can never have the time to give the proper attention to studying. I've realized that after taking it twice and after two LSAT classes, the only way I would continue to improve would be quitting my job entirely and studying for two months almost as a full-time job. But this is not an option since I can't just stop working. I know there are many people that have a lot going on in their lives but still find time to study on the LSAT, but I am just not able to give it the attention it would need to bolster my score in my current capacity. So yes, I guess I give up at this point but I'm 25 going on 26 and just need to go to law school. It's what I want to do and I have legal experience that confirms this desire.

Man, can I just /thread here? No one seems to be giving positive feedback really as I'm not interested in the "retake or don't go" line from some people who probably haven't worked in a law office in their lives.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby Mr. Somebody » Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:13 pm

iceicebaby wrote:
Well I'm not some kid in college or some recent graduate living at home with nothing but time for studying for the LSAT. I work a full-time paralegal job and just can never have the time to give the proper attention to studying. I've realized that after taking it twice and after two LSAT classes, the only way I would continue to improve would be quitting my job entirely and studying for two months almost as a full-time job. But this is not an option since I can't just stop working. I know there are many people that have a lot going on in their lives but still find time to study on the LSAT, but I am just not able to give it the attention it would need to bolster my score in my current capacity. So yes, I guess I give up at this point but I'm 25 going on 26 and just need to go to law school. It's what I want to do and I have legal experience that confirms this desire.

Man, can I just /thread here? No one seems to be giving positive feedback really as I'm not interested in the "retake or don't go" line from some people who probably haven't worked in a law office in their lives.


I also work a full-time paralegal job and took the test twice.... being a paralegal is one of the most common work experiences for 0L's so you really aren't anything special for having "worked in a law office". I think you have already been giving solid advice from all angles, as the fact is that these schools are bad bets. If you are understanding of that and willing to roll the dice, then that's your decision.

The real question is not if you want to go to law school but if you want to be a lawyer. If you just want to go to law school, then go... but if you want to be a lawyer (and not in some shitlaw firm), then you need to re-evaluate.

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:21 pm

Mr. Somebody wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:
Well I'm not some kid in college or some recent graduate living at home with nothing but time for studying for the LSAT. I work a full-time paralegal job and just can never have the time to give the proper attention to studying. I've realized that after taking it twice and after two LSAT classes, the only way I would continue to improve would be quitting my job entirely and studying for two months almost as a full-time job. But this is not an option since I can't just stop working. I know there are many people that have a lot going on in their lives but still find time to study on the LSAT, but I am just not able to give it the attention it would need to bolster my score in my current capacity. So yes, I guess I give up at this point but I'm 25 going on 26 and just need to go to law school. It's what I want to do and I have legal experience that confirms this desire.

Man, can I just /thread here? No one seems to be giving positive feedback really as I'm not interested in the "retake or don't go" line from some people who probably haven't worked in a law office in their lives.


I also work a full-time paralegal job and took the test twice.... being a paralegal is one of the most common work experiences for 0L's so you really aren't anything special for having "worked in a law office". I think you have already been giving solid advice from all angles, as the fact is that these schools are bad bets. If you are understanding of that and willing to roll the dice, then that's your decision.

The real question is not if you want to go to law school but if you want to be a lawyer. If you just want to go to law school, then go... but if you want to be a lawyer (and not in some shitlaw firm), then you need to re-evaluate.


Fair enough then, if you're in the same boat. I guess I know myself better than anyone else does and I know that unless I quit my job, I won't do much better the third time around on the LSAT.

Of course I want to be a lawyer. If I didn't I wouldn't have tortured myself for the past few years trying to go to law school. So do you have an opinion on my question or not?

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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby Mr. Somebody » Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:24 pm

iceicebaby wrote:
Mr. Somebody wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:
Well I'm not some kid in college or some recent graduate living at home with nothing but time for studying for the LSAT. I work a full-time paralegal job and just can never have the time to give the proper attention to studying. I've realized that after taking it twice and after two LSAT classes, the only way I would continue to improve would be quitting my job entirely and studying for two months almost as a full-time job. But this is not an option since I can't just stop working. I know there are many people that have a lot going on in their lives but still find time to study on the LSAT, but I am just not able to give it the attention it would need to bolster my score in my current capacity. So yes, I guess I give up at this point but I'm 25 going on 26 and just need to go to law school. It's what I want to do and I have legal experience that confirms this desire.

Man, can I just /thread here? No one seems to be giving positive feedback really as I'm not interested in the "retake or don't go" line from some people who probably haven't worked in a law office in their lives.


I also work a full-time paralegal job and took the test twice.... being a paralegal is one of the most common work experiences for 0L's so you really aren't anything special for having "worked in a law office". I think you have already been giving solid advice from all angles, as the fact is that these schools are bad bets. If you are understanding of that and willing to roll the dice, then that's your decision.

The real question is not if you want to go to law school but if you want to be a lawyer. If you just want to go to law school, then go... but if you want to be a lawyer (and not in some shitlaw firm), then you need to re-evaluate.


Fair enough then, if you're in the same boat. I guess I know myself better than anyone else does and I know that unless I quit my job, I won't do much better the third time around on the LSAT.

Of course I want to be a lawyer. If I didn't I wouldn't have tortured myself for the past few years trying to go to law school. So do you have an opinion on my question or not?


Rutgers easily.

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iceicebaby
Posts: 272
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Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby iceicebaby » Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:36 pm

Mr. Somebody wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:
Mr. Somebody wrote:
iceicebaby wrote:
Well I'm not some kid in college or some recent graduate living at home with nothing but time for studying for the LSAT. I work a full-time paralegal job and just can never have the time to give the proper attention to studying. I've realized that after taking it twice and after two LSAT classes, the only way I would continue to improve would be quitting my job entirely and studying for two months almost as a full-time job. But this is not an option since I can't just stop working. I know there are many people that have a lot going on in their lives but still find time to study on the LSAT, but I am just not able to give it the attention it would need to bolster my score in my current capacity. So yes, I guess I give up at this point but I'm 25 going on 26 and just need to go to law school. It's what I want to do and I have legal experience that confirms this desire.

Man, can I just /thread here? No one seems to be giving positive feedback really as I'm not interested in the "retake or don't go" line from some people who probably haven't worked in a law office in their lives.


I also work a full-time paralegal job and took the test twice.... being a paralegal is one of the most common work experiences for 0L's so you really aren't anything special for having "worked in a law office". I think you have already been giving solid advice from all angles, as the fact is that these schools are bad bets. If you are understanding of that and willing to roll the dice, then that's your decision.

The real question is not if you want to go to law school but if you want to be a lawyer. If you just want to go to law school, then go... but if you want to be a lawyer (and not in some shitlaw firm), then you need to re-evaluate.


Fair enough then, if you're in the same boat. I guess I know myself better than anyone else does and I know that unless I quit my job, I won't do much better the third time around on the LSAT.

Of course I want to be a lawyer. If I didn't I wouldn't have tortured myself for the past few years trying to go to law school. So do you have an opinion on my question or not?


Rutgers easily.


Thanks man!!! Probably should have just done a poll instead ... that's my bad.

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20130312
Posts: 3842
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2011 8:53 pm

Re: Rutgers-Newark vs. Seton Hall (with $)

Postby 20130312 » Mon Jan 23, 2012 1:11 pm

iceicebaby wrote:Well I'm not some kid in college or some recent graduate living at home with nothing but time for studying for the LSAT. I work a full-time paralegal job and just can never have the time to give the proper attention to studying. I've realized that after taking it twice and after two LSAT classes, the only way I would continue to improve would be quitting my job entirely and studying for two months almost as a full-time job. But this is not an option since I can't just stop working. I know there are many people that have a lot going on in their lives but still find time to study on the LSAT, but I am just not able to give it the attention it would need to bolster my score in my current capacity. So yes, I guess I give up at this point but I'm 25 going on 26 and just need to go to law school. It's what I want to do and I have legal experience that confirms this desire.


This is bull. I work a full time job as well and still carved a ton of time out of my nights and weekends to study for the LSAT. Sure, I was exhausted and it was tough to get through the day at work, but that's just what you have to do to score well on the LSAT.




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