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Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 1:54 pm
by Loyalty
Hello, I am a prospect law applicant and I am interested in becoming a judge or a law professor (probably after a few years of practicing law especially). What areas/focus of laws are especially good for preparing for the desired route? And, what law schools (top 100) should I look into?

thanks,

Loyalty

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 1:55 pm
by ToTransferOrNot
Loyalty wrote:Hello, I am a prospect law applicant and I am interested in becoming a judge or a law professor (probably after a few years of practicing law especially). What areas/focus of laws are especially good for preparing for the desired route? And, what law schools (top 100) should I look into?

thanks,

Loyalty


What is this I don't even

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 2:02 pm
by Tom Joad
Loyalty wrote:Hello, I am a prospect law applicant and I am interested in becoming a judge or a law professor (probably after a few years of practicing law especially). What areas/focus of laws are especially good for preparing for the desired route? And, what law schools (top 100) should I look into?

thanks,

Loyalty


I would look at Yale, Harvard, and Stanford as prospective schools to attend.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:10 pm
by Yukos
I imagine becoming a judge without more than "a few years" of practicing law is pretty much impossible.

For becoming a professor, Yale. If Yale is impossible, Harvard, Stanford or (maybe) Chicago, with strong grades and a publication. If you can't make those, go to a lesser school and publish like crazy during and after LS.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:12 pm
by JamMasterJ
Yale

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:15 pm
by UnamSanctam
Yale, Harvard, Stanford

To a lesser extent, Chicago, Columbia. Otherwise, forget about becoming a prof.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:20 pm
by JamMasterJ
UnamSanctam wrote:Yale, Harvard, Stanford

To a lesser extent, Chicago, Columbia. Otherwise, forget about becoming a prof.

for academia, Chicago is greater than or equal to Stanford

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:29 pm
by Loyalty
My apologies for not making it clear, I will not be practicing in the U.S. I will be going back to my home country (which does not have any law schools but most of the legal stuff are based on U.S constitution and law). I guess I was not also clear enough to mention that I was especially looking for a specialty/concentration (constitutional, administrative, ???) that is relevant to the job and what schools (doesn't have to THE BEST but within tier 1 &2 range) that are especially good in those areas. I hope that helps....

Loyalty

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:35 pm
by CanadianWolf
Go to the best law school to which you are admitted. Otherwise, ask judges in your home country for recommendations.

P.S. It will be difficult to become a law professor in a country with no law schools.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 4:12 pm
by HeavenWood
The good news is that becoming a judge (especially a state judge) has little to do merit. Just befriend the right people from the right political party in your desired region.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:23 am
by thedive
Go to a school that has one of the largest law libraries. Judges and profs. are very smart because they read about 16 hours of the day. Make sure to also keep up with local gossip reading such as the National Enquirer, Star Magazine, etc. Judges hate to be out of the loop on anything.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 1:11 pm
by FlightoftheEarls
JamMasterJ wrote:
UnamSanctam wrote:Yale, Harvard, Stanford

To a lesser extent, Chicago, Columbia. Otherwise, forget about becoming a prof.

for academia, Chicago is greater than or equal to Stanford


http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=150721&p=4188514&hilit=academia#p4188514

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 8:03 pm
by mattviphky
it's not all about practice. My step-dad was telling my about a guy in chicago with a big family name that ran for judge fresh out of law school. Judges in Illinois are elected...not exactly merit-based.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 1:51 am
by WSJ_Law
Lol at this imbecile thinking he'll be a judge just lol

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 2:40 am
by vanwinkle
WSJ_Law wrote:Lol at this imbecile thinking he'll be a judge just lol

Image

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 3:13 pm
by JamMasterJ
FlightoftheEarls wrote:
JamMasterJ wrote:
UnamSanctam wrote:Yale, Harvard, Stanford

To a lesser extent, Chicago, Columbia. Otherwise, forget about becoming a prof.

for academia, Chicago is greater than or equal to Stanford


http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=150721&p=4188514&hilit=academia#p4188514

I stand corrected. I had just heard that Chi is more academia focused than S. Guess not.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 3:22 pm
by NZA
Loyalty wrote:My apologies for not making it clear, I will not be practicing in the U.S. I will be going back to my home country (which does not have any law schools but most of the legal stuff are based on U.S constitution and law). I guess I was not also clear enough to mention that I was especially looking for a specialty/concentration (constitutional, administrative, ???) that is relevant to the job and what schools (doesn't have to THE BEST but within tier 1 &2 range) that are especially good in those areas. I hope that helps....

Loyalty

...how are you going to be a law professor in your country if there are no law schools?

Like...you want to teach at the undergraduate level?

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 12:30 pm
by TMC116
From what i understand, Columbia actually turns out more profs than virtually any other school.

Obviously, if you go into the top 3 then you'll still be in a good position for academia (if you finish really well in your class).

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 5:50 pm
by JamMasterJ
TMC116 wrote:From what i understand, Columbia actually turns out more profs than virtually any other school.

Obviously, if you go into the top 3 then you'll still be in a good position for academia (if you finish really well in your class).

If you mean by "virtually every school" you mean raw as opposed to per capita, and all but a few, then yes.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 1:53 am
by johnnyutah
Yukos wrote:I imagine becoming a judge without more than "a few years" of practicing law is pretty much impossible.

You'd be wrong. You just have to be a Senator's son.

http://articles.latimes.com/2002/feb/15/news/mn-28198

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 1:58 am
by paul34
..

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 2:01 am
by IAFG
CanadianWolf wrote:Go to the best law school to which you are admitted. Otherwise, ask judges in your home country for recommendations.

P.S. It will be difficult to become a law professor in a country with no law schools.

This is the only good advice ITT so far.

No one here even knows what your home country is, and probably even if you told us, we couldn't meaningfully help you figure this out. You need a good mentor back home (and I would ask multiple people for advice to try to find some consensus).

If you've already done that and they've just said to get some American JD, the curriculum at most schools is pretty equivalent so I would be bargain-shopping. If money were no object, I'd probably be aiming for DC-area schools.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 12:01 pm
by FlightoftheEarls
TMC116 wrote:From what i understand, Columbia actually turns out more profs than virtually any other school.

Obviously, if you go into the top 3 then you'll still be in a good position for academia (if you finish really well in your class).

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Sun Nov 27, 2011 9:33 pm
by anstone1988
Loyalty wrote:My apologies for not making it clear, I will not be practicing in the U.S. I will be going back to my home country (which does not have any law schools but most of the legal stuff are based on U.S constitution and law). I guess I was not also clear enough to mention that I was especially looking for a specialty/concentration (constitutional, administrative, ???) that is relevant to the job and what schools (doesn't have to THE BEST but within tier 1 &2 range) that are especially good in those areas. I hope that helps....

Loyalty


If abroad, then Harvard. If in the US, then Yale.

Re: Law for judges/profs

Posted: Sun Nov 27, 2011 11:37 pm
by SehMeSerrious
IAFG0 wrote:If you've already done that and they've just said to get some American JD, the curriculum at most schools is pretty equivalent so I would be bargain-shopping. If money were no object, I'd probably be aiming for DC-area schools.

Just curious, why DC over other areas?