Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

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MrAnon
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Re: Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

Postby MrAnon » Sun Oct 16, 2011 12:07 pm

Both schools are a one way ticket to the 99%, lower middle class, upper low class lifestyle. Never heard of anyone from either school making biglaw except in doc reviewer or staff attorney capacity. Both feed huge to state court clerkships. Presumably if the students were employable they'd get actual jobs instead of clerkships. No idea what the employment rate is following the clerkship, and I doubt the schools keep those statistics because they dont want to know either.

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mrtoren
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Re: Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

Postby mrtoren » Tue Oct 18, 2011 8:56 pm

MrAnon wrote:Both schools are a one way ticket to the 99%, lower middle class, upper low class lifestyle. Never heard of anyone from either school making biglaw except in doc reviewer or staff attorney capacity. Both feed huge to state court clerkships. Presumably if the students were employable they'd get actual jobs instead of clerkships. No idea what the employment rate is following the clerkship, and I doubt the schools keep those statistics because they dont want to know either.

I thought you were a respectable contributor because of your post count, but your head is so far up your ass that I'm afraid you might not know which way is up anymore. Do you have any idea what kind of connections and experience clerkships build? Judges are fantastic references and many firms prefer and pay big bonuses for clerkship experience. I would also venture to say that your speculation about Rutgers' grads futures is completely baseless and out of line. Unless you have figures to contradict the official employment statistics, 78% of RU-N and 68% of RU-C grads are employed at graduation. That's better than some T30 schools. At 9 months, 90% of RU-N and 84% of RU-C grads are employed. Also very strong numbers. Median private sector salaries are $135,000 (RU-N) and $115,000 (RU-C) respectively. Again, excellent numbers. If you want to bash TT schools, go ahead. But leave Rutgers out of it. Both rankings deviate from the true potential of these schools. Best case scenario, you haven't taken more than glance or two at both Rutgers' employment figures.

To those considering Rutgers, please contact me for reliable advice.

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Wholigan
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Re: Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

Postby Wholigan » Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:23 pm

MrAnon wrote:Both schools are a one way ticket to the 99%, lower middle class, upper low class lifestyle. Never heard of anyone from either school making biglaw except in doc reviewer or staff attorney capacity. Both feed huge to state court clerkships. Presumably if the students were employable they'd get actual jobs instead of clerkships. No idea what the employment rate is following the clerkship, and I doubt the schools keep those statistics because they dont want to know either.


mrtoren wrote:I thought you were a respectable contributor because of your post count, but your head is so far up your ass that I'm afraid you might not know which way is up anymore. Do you have any idea what kind of connections and experience clerkships build? Judges are fantastic references and many firms prefer and pay big bonuses for clerkship experience. I would also venture to say that your speculation about Rutgers' grads futures is completely baseless and out of line. Unless you have figures to contradict the official employment statistics, 78% of RU-N and 68% of RU-C grads are employed at graduation. That's better than some T30 schools. At 9 months, 90% of RU-N and 84% of RU-C grads are employed. Also very strong numbers. Median private sector salaries are $135,000 (RU-N) and $115,000 (RU-C) respectively. Again, excellent numbers. If you want to bash TT schools, go ahead. But leave Rutgers out of it. Both rankings deviate from the true potential of these schools. Best case scenario, you haven't taken more than glance or two at both Rutgers' employment figures.

To those considering Rutgers, please contact me for reliable advice.


The real truth is miles from either of your respective positions, somewhere in the middle. To imply that no one from either school makes big law is patently false. While neither is the right choice to get into biglaw, both place over 10% into large law firms, and most NJ biglaw firms are made up of over half Rutgers & SH grads.

Regurgitating the employment numbers the schools put out is pretty useless, however. You are not new to this site, mrtoren. You should know how to use LST and see that those medians represent only about 35% of the class. In reality, less than 20% of the class earns those salaries, not 50% as a median would suggest. You should also know that "employed" counts part-time work and jobs which do not require a JD. Also, the vast majority of clerkships that Rutgers and Seton Hall feed into are state court clerkships. Firms do not pay any bonus for these clerkships.

Ronburgandy2468
Posts: 87
Joined: Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:49 am

Re: Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

Postby Ronburgandy2468 » Thu Oct 20, 2011 6:18 am

Wholigan wrote:
MrAnon wrote:Both schools are a one way ticket to the 99%, lower middle class, upper low class lifestyle. Never heard of anyone from either school making biglaw except in doc reviewer or staff attorney capacity. Both feed huge to state court clerkships. Presumably if the students were employable they'd get actual jobs instead of clerkships. No idea what the employment rate is following the clerkship, and I doubt the schools keep those statistics because they dont want to know either.


mrtoren wrote:I thought you were a respectable contributor because of your post count, but your head is so far up your ass that I'm afraid you might not know which way is up anymore. Do you have any idea what kind of connections and experience clerkships build? Judges are fantastic references and many firms prefer and pay big bonuses for clerkship experience. I would also venture to say that your speculation about Rutgers' grads futures is completely baseless and out of line. Unless you have figures to contradict the official employment statistics, 78% of RU-N and 68% of RU-C grads are employed at graduation. That's better than some T30 schools. At 9 months, 90% of RU-N and 84% of RU-C grads are employed. Also very strong numbers. Median private sector salaries are $135,000 (RU-N) and $115,000 (RU-C) respectively. Again, excellent numbers. If you want to bash TT schools, go ahead. But leave Rutgers out of it. Both rankings deviate from the true potential of these schools. Best case scenario, you haven't taken more than glance or two at both Rutgers' employment figures.

To those considering Rutgers, please contact me for reliable advice.


The real truth is miles from either of your respective positions, somewhere in the middle. To imply that no one from either school makes big law is patently false. While neither is the right choice to get into biglaw, both place over 10% into large law firms, and most NJ biglaw firms are made up of over half Rutgers & SH grads.

Regurgitating the employment numbers the schools put out is pretty useless, however. You are not new to this site, mrtoren. You should know how to use LST and see that those medians represent only about 35% of the class. In reality, less than 20% of the class earns those salaries, not 50% as a median would suggest. You should also know that "employed" counts part-time work and jobs which do not require a JD. Also, the vast majority of clerkships that Rutgers and Seton Hall feed into are state court clerkships. Firms do not pay any bonus for these clerkships.


Yes but isn't LST based on a sample of graduate who decided to report data, as in it's not as reliable as well.
I was under the impression that roughly 35% of RU-N grads make over six figures.
less than 20% seems a bit low, imo. Then again, what do I know lol, 0L.

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beach_terror
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Re: Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

Postby beach_terror » Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:26 am

Ronburgandy2468 wrote:
Wholigan wrote:
MrAnon wrote:Both schools are a one way ticket to the 99%, lower middle class, upper low class lifestyle. Never heard of anyone from either school making biglaw except in doc reviewer or staff attorney capacity. Both feed huge to state court clerkships. Presumably if the students were employable they'd get actual jobs instead of clerkships. No idea what the employment rate is following the clerkship, and I doubt the schools keep those statistics because they dont want to know either.


mrtoren wrote:I thought you were a respectable contributor because of your post count, but your head is so far up your ass that I'm afraid you might not know which way is up anymore. Do you have any idea what kind of connections and experience clerkships build? Judges are fantastic references and many firms prefer and pay big bonuses for clerkship experience. I would also venture to say that your speculation about Rutgers' grads futures is completely baseless and out of line. Unless you have figures to contradict the official employment statistics, 78% of RU-N and 68% of RU-C grads are employed at graduation. That's better than some T30 schools. At 9 months, 90% of RU-N and 84% of RU-C grads are employed. Also very strong numbers. Median private sector salaries are $135,000 (RU-N) and $115,000 (RU-C) respectively. Again, excellent numbers. If you want to bash TT schools, go ahead. But leave Rutgers out of it. Both rankings deviate from the true potential of these schools. Best case scenario, you haven't taken more than glance or two at both Rutgers' employment figures.

To those considering Rutgers, please contact me for reliable advice.


The real truth is miles from either of your respective positions, somewhere in the middle. To imply that no one from either school makes big law is patently false. While neither is the right choice to get into biglaw, both place over 10% into large law firms, and most NJ biglaw firms are made up of over half Rutgers & SH grads.

Regurgitating the employment numbers the schools put out is pretty useless, however. You are not new to this site, mrtoren. You should know how to use LST and see that those medians represent only about 35% of the class. In reality, less than 20% of the class earns those salaries, not 50% as a median would suggest. You should also know that "employed" counts part-time work and jobs which do not require a JD. Also, the vast majority of clerkships that Rutgers and Seton Hall feed into are state court clerkships. Firms do not pay any bonus for these clerkships.


Yes but isn't LST based on a sample of graduate who decided to report data, as in it's not as reliable as well.
I was under the impression that roughly 35% of RU-N grads make over six figures.
less than 20% seems a bit low, imo. Then again, what do I know lol, 0L.

lol, 10-12% max will make six figures at graduation. Read the site before you start posting.

MrAnon
Posts: 1615
Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2010 9:08 pm

Re: Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

Postby MrAnon » Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:37 am

I thought you were a respectable contributor because of your post count, but your head is so far up your ass that I'm afraid you might not know which way is up anymore. Do you have any idea what kind of connections and experience clerkships build? Judges are fantastic references and many firms prefer and pay big bonuses for clerkship experience. I would also venture to say that your speculation about Rutgers' grads futures is completely baseless and out of line. Unless you have figures to contradict the official employment statistics, 78% of RU-N and 68% of RU-C grads are employed at graduation. That's better than some T30 schools. At 9 months, 90% of RU-N and 84% of RU-C grads are employed. Also very strong numbers. Median private sector salaries are $135,000 (RU-N) and $115,000 (RU-C) respectively. Again, excellent numbers. If you want to bash TT schools, go ahead. But leave Rutgers out of it. Both rankings deviate from the true potential of these schools. Best case scenario, you haven't taken more than glance or two at both Rutgers' employment figures.


State and local court judge references and recommendations become meaningless when the same student body is shuffled out of the schools and into the court system year after year after year. The selectivity of these positions is not high. You are confusing them with Article III Fed Court clerkships which are relatively rare from either one of these schools. Many firms do not pay big bonuses for your run of the mill Rutgers/SH grad who goes on to a state court clerkship just like 50% of his class.

Those employment figures are unimpressive and inflated because they include clerkships as employment when in reality a clerkship is limited to a year, its not permanent. As soon as you begin it you know its going to end and soon. The excellent private sector salary numbers are reflective of a very small portion of the class. the rankings are the rankings, they speak for themselves.

HeavenWood
Posts: 2915
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Re: Rutgers-N V. Seton Hall

Postby HeavenWood » Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:41 am

MrAnon wrote:
I thought you were a respectable contributor because of your post count, but your head is so far up your ass that I'm afraid you might not know which way is up anymore. Do you have any idea what kind of connections and experience clerkships build? Judges are fantastic references and many firms prefer and pay big bonuses for clerkship experience. I would also venture to say that your speculation about Rutgers' grads futures is completely baseless and out of line. Unless you have figures to contradict the official employment statistics, 78% of RU-N and 68% of RU-C grads are employed at graduation. That's better than some T30 schools. At 9 months, 90% of RU-N and 84% of RU-C grads are employed. Also very strong numbers. Median private sector salaries are $135,000 (RU-N) and $115,000 (RU-C) respectively. Again, excellent numbers. If you want to bash TT schools, go ahead. But leave Rutgers out of it. Both rankings deviate from the true potential of these schools. Best case scenario, you haven't taken more than glance or two at both Rutgers' employment figures.


State and local court judge references and recommendations become meaningless when the same student body is shuffled out of the schools and into the court system year after year after year. The selectivity of these positions is not high. You are confusing them with Article III Fed Court clerkships which are relatively rare from either one of these schools. Many firms do not pay big bonuses for your run of the mill Rutgers/SH grad who goes on to a state court clerkship just like 50% of his class.

Those employment figures are unimpressive and inflated because they include clerkships as employment when in reality a clerkship is limited to a year, its not permanent. As soon as you begin it you know its going to end and soon. The excellent private sector salary numbers are reflective of a very small portion of the class. the rankings are the rankings, they speak for themselves.

I think the point he's trying to make is that statements like these:

Never heard of anyone from either school making biglaw except in doc reviewer or staff attorney capacity

Are pure hyperbole.




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