Law and Economics

(Rankings, Profiles, Tuition, Student Life, . . . )
dkt4
Posts: 316
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 6:33 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby dkt4 » Tue Aug 09, 2011 6:25 pm

pcwcecac wrote:Why is UChicago usually not TCR?


because its the U of Chicago.

duh

User avatar
ahduth
Posts: 2468
Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:55 am

Re: Law and Economics

Postby ahduth » Tue Aug 09, 2011 6:34 pm

TaipeiMort wrote:
pcwcecac wrote:Why is UChicago usually not TCR?


He was joking-- or maybe he goes to Northwestern.

Chicago is awesome, and does have the best law and econ program in the world, and invented it. Also, it is pretty good for academia-- I would place it right under HY and above S (probably because of the law and econ focus of the school).


Just here to confirm Taipei as a Chicago troll. Complete with jabs at Northwestern and Stanford.

User avatar
TaipeiMort
Posts: 874
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 11:51 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby TaipeiMort » Tue Aug 09, 2011 6:54 pm

ahduth wrote:
TaipeiMort wrote:
pcwcecac wrote:Why is UChicago usually not TCR?


He was joking-- or maybe he goes to Northwestern.

Chicago is awesome, and does have the best law and econ program in the world, and invented it. Also, it is pretty good for academia-- I would place it right under HY and above S (probably because of the law and econ focus of the school).


Just here to confirm Taipei as a Chicago troll. Complete with jabs at Northwestern and Stanford.


It wasn't a jab at Northwestern, he goes to Northwestern doesn't he?, and you need to take anything a NU guy says about Chicago with a huge grain of salt. Also, Chicago may outplace Stanford in Academia... I really don't know. If you want trolling, I'll give you some:

The US News Rankings hugely undervalues Chicago, and (adjusting to remove the effects of law prestige) the rankings should be Yale, Chicago, Harvard, Stanford.

Evidence:

The most law firm partners, adjusted by class size, of any school-- Almost double the number of number 2 (Harvard).

More Supreme Court Clerks per capita than any school but Yale.

Objectively the best faculty in the country (The President, and two members of the Supreme Court taught there). Current faculty include Posner, Epstein, Easterbrook, Wood, Sunstein, and Baird.

The best law firm placement of any school (NLJ250).

Invented law and economics, the JD, and popularized the Socratic method.

User avatar
Sentry
Posts: 1235
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:38 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby Sentry » Tue Aug 09, 2011 7:44 pm

TaipeiMort wrote:
ahduth wrote:
TaipeiMort wrote:
pcwcecac wrote:Why is UChicago usually not TCR?


He was joking-- or maybe he goes to Northwestern.

Chicago is awesome, and does have the best law and econ program in the world, and invented it. Also, it is pretty good for academia-- I would place it right under HY and above S (probably because of the law and econ focus of the school).


Just here to confirm Taipei as a Chicago troll. Complete with jabs at Northwestern and Stanford.


It wasn't a jab at Northwestern, he goes to Northwestern doesn't he?, and you need to take anything a NU guy says about Chicago with a huge grain of salt. Also, Chicago may outplace Stanford in Academia... I really don't know. If you want trolling, I'll give you some:

The US News Rankings hugely undervalues Chicago, and (adjusting to remove the effects of law prestige) the rankings should be Yale, Chicago, Harvard, Stanford.

Evidence:

The most law firm partners, adjusted by class size, of any school-- Almost double the number of number 2 (Harvard).

More Supreme Court Clerks per capita than any school but Yale.

Objectively the best faculty in the country (The President, and two members of the Supreme Court taught there). Current faculty include Posner, Epstein, Easterbrook, Wood, Sunstein, and Baird.

The best law firm placement of any school (NLJ250).

Invented law and economics, the JD, and popularized the Socratic method.


This reminds me of Talladega nights.

Ricky: Really, smarty-pants? What did French land give us?
Jean: We invented democracy, existentialism, and the blowjob.

dkt4
Posts: 316
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 6:33 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby dkt4 » Tue Aug 09, 2011 7:49 pm

poor chicago, always the red headed step child.

pcwcecac
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:32 am

Re: Law and Economics

Postby pcwcecac » Tue Aug 09, 2011 10:51 pm

Taipei is awesome. I will ED U of Chicago. Heck, even a Northwestern guy concedes that it's TCR given my circumstances.

User avatar
Lovely Ludwig Van
Posts: 370
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 1:43 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby Lovely Ludwig Van » Wed Aug 10, 2011 1:21 am

Sentry wrote:
Ricky: Really, smarty-pants? What did French land give us?
Jean: We invented democracy, existentialism, and the blowjob.


I LOL-ed. More and more I get the feeling that only thing UChicago student ever thinks about is "we're the shit but no one knows about it."

Citizen Genet
Posts: 516
Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2011 10:03 am

Re: Law and Economics

Postby Citizen Genet » Wed Aug 10, 2011 9:52 am

I may have missed this in the thread, but have you considered Vandy's Law and Economics PhD? If you're considering academia a PhD is a nice piece of paper to have under your belt. Vandy's not too shabby in terms of a law program either.

http://law.vanderbilt.edu/academics/aca ... index.aspx

If you're looking for three years only, obviously it won't be for you. But if you want to focus on law and economics intensely, then this could be for you.

pcwcecac
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:32 am

Re: Law and Economics

Postby pcwcecac » Wed Aug 10, 2011 11:22 am

Thanks Citizen. That's certainly a good suggestion.

I looked up vandy's program. They have a very high quality student body. I'm still looking for their job placement record though....

bdubs
Posts: 3729
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 2:23 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby bdubs » Wed Aug 10, 2011 11:32 am

I think everyone here is on the right track, although most top schools now have a decent faculty, courses, and resources for the study of law and economics. To get a sense of which ones have active funding that was mentioned above, you can look at the recipients of Olin foundation funding.

The advice that hasn't been clear ITT is that if you really want to teach you should try hard to enroll in a JD/PhD program, and go to any T14 that accepts you for a joint degree. Having a PhD in econ will probably get you out ahead of a lot of the JD only students, and it will get you funding for your studies that wouldn't be available with your numbers.

Failing admission to a PhD program, you should probably go to Chicago (assuming you can get in).

Citizen Genet
Posts: 516
Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2011 10:03 am

Re: Law and Economics

Postby Citizen Genet » Wed Aug 10, 2011 11:34 am

pcwcecac wrote:Thanks Citizen. That's certainly a good suggestion.

I looked up vandy's program. They have a very high quality student body. I'm still looking for their job placement record though....



I know they do well in the South and in D.C. They also do abnormally well in clerkship placement, so if you have the disposition to do a clerkship to try to get into academia, they can help you there.

Certainly, if you are in a PhD program, I'm sure that would boost your credentials for a great antitrust firm like Gibson Dunn, Jones Day, etc.

pcwcecac
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:32 am

Re: Law and Economics

Postby pcwcecac » Wed Aug 10, 2011 12:02 pm

a good point from bdub. And congrats on the NU joint program. It's efficient, to say the very very least.

I waived off the JD/PhD thought prematurely, mainly due to the length of the program. But academia is a long long journey; an extra 3-4 years investment might be trivial in the long run.

That said, 7 years + 2 years of clerkship (if I'm fortunate) YIKES! While bdub finishes 2 degrees in 3 years and spends the remaining 6 earning more money than I can ever accumulate. It really comes down to how much I want to be in academia, doesn't it?

bdubs
Posts: 3729
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 2:23 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby bdubs » Wed Aug 10, 2011 12:12 pm

pcwcecac wrote:a good point from bdub. And congrats on the NU joint program. It's efficient, to say the very very least.

I waived off the JD/PhD thought prematurely, mainly due to the length of the program. But academia is a long long journey; an extra 3-4 years investment might be trivial in the long run.

That said, 7 years + 2 years of clerkship (if I'm fortunate) YIKES! While bdub finishes 2 degrees in 3 years and spends the remaining 6 earning more money than I can ever accumulate. It really comes down to how much I want to be in academia, doesn't it?


Thanks. I considered the JD/Econ PhD route myself and found that I wasn't commited enough to do it, but academia was not my primary end goal. While the rest of us are attending T14 programs at substantial cost (the real cost of sticker is somwhere around $300k), a joint PhD student usually has no out of pocket tuition costs and a stipend that covers a modest standard of living. A clerkship is not a prerequisite for an academic with a PhD and it seems feasible to complete a clership while working on a dissertation.

As for timing I would really think of a JD/PhD as 2 years of law (they waive or cross credit most of the third year at a lot of schools) and 2 years of core curriculum in your PhD program. After that you are working on your dissertation, teaching courses, and churning out research and publications for as many years as it takes you to bring it all together. If you are truly committed to academia, the latter part of that should sound like fun and not like work.

pcwcecac
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:32 am

Re: Law and Economics

Postby pcwcecac » Wed Aug 10, 2011 12:35 pm

4 years of coursework is absolutely doable. Clerkship + Dissertation sounds very ambitious, but in the meantime, may complement each other very well. I didn't realize that JD/PhD students need not to pay law tuition. This is a game-changer.

bdubs
Posts: 3729
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 2:23 pm

Re: Law and Economics

Postby bdubs » Wed Aug 10, 2011 12:43 pm

pcwcecac wrote:4 years of coursework is absolutely doable. Clerkship + Dissertation sounds very ambitious, but in the meantime, may complement each other very well. I didn't realize that JD/PhD students need not to pay law tuition. This is a game-changer.


I would verify with the schools, but I believe that the university covers most if not all of the tuition for many joint JD/PhDs. Stanford has one of the more clear pages about this: http://www.law.stanford.edu/program/deg ... ancial_aid although it seems they expect you to pay for 1L with loans and then the PhD program covers the rest. This will probably vary from school to school a decent amount.




Return to “Choosing a Law School”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Veil of Ignorance and 4 guests