New Mexican Law

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scrowell
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby scrowell » Mon Aug 08, 2011 11:05 am

firemed: Ok yeah I see it now. But thanks for recognizing that I got "the call" hahaha

BeautifulSW: Every time I read that I'm glad I went to undergrad for free and that I go to a school that costs 10k/year. I'm just curious though, does that mean you see a decent amount of non-UNM grads? I feel like UNM grads wouldn't necessarily have triple-digit debt.

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esq
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby esq » Mon Aug 08, 2011 11:08 am

scrowell wrote:Hey guys,
I'm talking sweet 3 bedroom houses for like $150k in Albuquerque, a major city.

Honestly, it's not as major a city as you might think. Sure, it looks fine and dandy in pictures - that's easy to fabricate. But you should visit it first, honestly. The reality of it is that Albuquerque is a small, brown (dirt, brown buildings, more dirt), desert city that takes no more than 5 to 10 minutes to drive through from end to end and resemble's more of a dirty Phoenix Jr than anything. Its downtown isn't nearly as beautiful as it is in the pictures that you are making your judgements on, and unlike most major cities that have a large downtown, suburbs, and other small cities surrounding it, Alburquerque goes as follows: desert emptiness - small town - desert emptiness. Check it out before you make any decisions, and if you like it, more power to ya. It would be a heck of a place to live if you enjoy ATVing.

BeautifulSW
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby BeautifulSW » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:00 pm

Albuquerque really isn't as cosmopolitan as, say, Tucson. It is more like a very large small town than a small big city. Non UNM Law people make it all the time in New Mexico, especially outside the Albuquerque-Santa Fe dyad. It just takes longer, that's all. Of the eight Judges serving on the local District bench in my Southern N.Mex. city, two are UNM Law grads, one U.T. Austin, two are Georgetown, one Hastings, one NY Law School, and one Notre Dame.

Just off the top of my head, I can think of grads I've worked with from Gonzaga, Thos. Jefferson, Texas Tech, Columbia, Denver U., Vermont Law, U. Utah, San Fernando Valley (a CBE school), North Dakota, American U., The Pontifical University, Glendale (another CBE school), Yale and Harvard (of course), South Texas, St. Mary's, and Cooley. Oh, and U. Buffalo, Washington U. St. Louis, and the University of Alberta.

So the OP can finish his degree at CUNY and come here if he chooses. Since that route is fairly inexpensive, it might be the best way to go.

Crud. I left out U. Wisconsin and Oklahoma City. Oh, and Creighton.

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NewLobo
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby NewLobo » Mon Aug 08, 2011 5:49 pm

BeautifulSW wrote:Oh, and I give up..."PDL"?

--LinkRemoved--

It's south of Santa Rosa.
I'm part of the old families of NM mentioned earlier in the thread. The Santa Rosa + PDL area is where one side of my family comes from.

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scrowell
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby scrowell » Mon Aug 08, 2011 6:07 pm

BeautifulSW: Great info as usual, thanks a lot!

esq: I REALLY want to go visit. I've seen a few round trip Southwest vouchers on craigslist for like $250-300 and I've been tempted to buy one and go down to Abq or El Paso/Las Cruces for a couple days before school officially starts. I'm really trying to limit my expenses now though, and someone earlier in the thread suggested using spring break to road trip down to SW Texas and New Mexico so that I can see more of the area rather than just one city. Basically, my point is, I'm definitely going to visit first. Just trying to work out the details right now. But anyway, thanks for your input!

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theavrock
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby theavrock » Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:26 am

esq wrote:
scrowell wrote:Hey guys,
I'm talking sweet 3 bedroom houses for like $150k in Albuquerque, a major city.

Honestly, it's not as major a city as you might think. Sure, it looks fine and dandy in pictures - that's easy to fabricate. But you should visit it first, honestly. The reality of it is that Albuquerque is a small, brown (dirt, brown buildings, more dirt), desert city that takes no more than 5 to 10 minutes to drive through from end to end and resemble's more of a dirty Phoenix Jr than anything. Its downtown isn't nearly as beautiful as it is in the pictures that you are making your judgements on, and unlike most major cities that have a large downtown, suburbs, and other small cities surrounding it, Alburquerque goes as follows: desert emptiness - small town - desert emptiness. Check it out before you make any decisions, and if you like it, more power to ya. It would be a heck of a place to live if you enjoy ATVing.



If you honestly believe the bolded I'm surprised you have spent much time in ABQ.

Driving from Rio Bravo down in the South Valley up to Tramway in the Heights would easily take you 30+ minutes. Same thing going from the Four Hills area up to Cottonwood. Maybe if you stay on 25 it would take less time to drive end to end, but even then the airport to Tramway is at least a 20 min drive.

Not that I necessarily disagree with you about ABQ not being a "major" city, but for very different reasons. ABQ is incredibly spread out and this leaves a lack of high density neighborhoods that help define cities. It is not a small town by any means, but it lacks a big city feel because of how spread out it is.

tbenting
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby tbenting » Thu Sep 29, 2011 4:51 pm

I'm off topic of law school choice, but I have a Q about NM v. TX bar. I think I might want to do both (ick). The way I understand it, I can transfer my MBE score from TX to NM, but not the other way around (stupid TX), but it has to be done in concurrence with my NM bar app. I guess, then, I'd take the bar in Texas, then take NM-specific stuff in NM the same year? Is it worth it?

Ideally, right now anyhow, I want to practice in NM. However, I dont really know what job-course to take (and I'm a 2L...slacking). I've got experience as a legal assistant, interned for a federal judge over the summer, participating in an ADR Clinic in the spring, so I am not slacking completely, I'm just not doing OCI crap.

Is there a "best way/strategy" to gain admission to the bars of both states?

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Bosque
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby Bosque » Fri Sep 30, 2011 5:31 pm

This thread reminded me that the balloon fiesta starts tomorrow, and I again am not going to be able to go home to see it. And I likely won't be able to make it next year either (pretty sure taking time off two weeks after starting a job is frowned upon).

This makes me sad.

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descartesb4thehorse
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby descartesb4thehorse » Fri Sep 30, 2011 6:16 pm

I love the balloon fiesta :cry:

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NewLobo
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby NewLobo » Sat Oct 01, 2011 3:12 pm

I'm more excited to go to the UNM vs. NMSU game tonight. The Balloon fiesta is always to crowded.

tbenting
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby tbenting » Sat Oct 01, 2011 7:02 pm

It should be fun to see UNM be destroyed by such a crappy team (NMSU).
/NMSU grad Dec 08

BeautifulSW
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby BeautifulSW » Thu Oct 06, 2011 4:49 pm

TX vs. N.Mex. Bar...

Texas, heaven bless them, allows NM lawyers to waive in after five years of practice experience. But that's ONLY if you haven't taken and failed the TX Bar! N.Mex. has reciprocity with no one. And the Texas Bar exam has a medium-nasty reputation whereas our Bar is tied with Montana as being the easiest in the country (last time I checked).. So conventional wisdom is to pass the NM Bar and work here for five years then waive into Tejas.

Funny thing, though...I've been eligible to waive into TX for decades and live right by the state yet I never seem to get around to it.

nStiver
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby nStiver » Thu Oct 06, 2011 10:07 pm

OP. If you want to practice in NM, cut your losses at your stuffy old NY school and come transfer to UNM law :mrgreen: . Its the best school in the country for working here. This advice is contingent, of course, on you not being a complete troll who is doing this for his own amusement.

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scrowell
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby scrowell » Sun Oct 09, 2011 6:44 pm

nStiver wrote:OP. If you want to practice in NM, cut your losses at your stuffy old NY school and come transfer to UNM law :mrgreen: . Its the best school in the country for working here. This advice is contingent, of course, on you not being a complete troll who is doing this for his own amusement.


I would love to, but alas, one must be a New Mexico resident in order to transfer to UNM. That would require, at the very least I assume, a move and then a year off before I could apply as a transfer. And imagine if they rejected me after all that work.

BeautifulSW
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby BeautifulSW » Mon Oct 24, 2011 11:59 am

The is another way to insinuate yourself into the N.Mex. legal market but it's not going to be very attractive and it will work only if you don't owe a ton of money to Aunt Sallie. Finish your J.D. at CUNY then start looking for a New Mexico entry level job with state or local government. Warning! This job will NOT be in Albuquerque, Santa Fe, or Taos (which last seems to be the fallback concession most outsiders are willing to make.) No, that job will be someplace like Farmington in the Four Corners region or (horrors) Hobbs or Clovis on the Eastern Plains and it will pay mid to late $40s to start. That's why you cannot be carrying $100,000 in debt. But rent on a 3 bedroom house will be about $350 so it could be worse. Then stick it out for two or three years.

These jobs come open fairly regularly and the source of your J.D. isn't terribly important (if it isn't UNM or Texas Tech, which do matter). You will learn to live in a Small Town without much in the way of Culture or Scenery and in the process you will earn some N.Mex. lawyer cred. Believe me, there is a big difference when applying for that Albuquerque slot between someone coming in directly from outside and the same person coming in after "paying his dues." Three years on the High Plains shows plenty of commitment to the state.

Warning! Every now and then someone tries this and discovers that (gasp) he LIKES living out there. (I loved it but my wife did not.) There is something vast and wonderful and basic and decent about that life; very much the feeling of the cowboy, I guess, which a lot of those folks actually ARE. If this happens, you may choose to live and eventually die on the lone prairie (and be sincerely mourned by your neighbors as having been a fine man (or woman), a good lawyer, and a distinguished Judge.)

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Veyron
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby Veyron » Wed Nov 02, 2011 8:22 pm

Well, I won't be working in New Mexico any time soon but I'm thinking about a nice romantic weekend roadtrip with the SO over the next few months. Tips?

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theavrock
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby theavrock » Wed Nov 02, 2011 10:02 pm

Veyron wrote:Well, I won't be working in New Mexico any time soon but I'm thinking about a nice romantic weekend roadtrip with the SO over the next few months. Tips?


Depends on what you want.

For nice and romantic hit up Santa Fe or Taos if you want a little larger city style, but mainly you want to be in the mountains at a B&B.

If you want more big city where you can explore a more urban environment you could try Corrales and ABQ will be right there.

If you really want remote and romantic you could try Cimmaron, Red River, Jemez Springs or Angel Fire. All little mountain towns that will give you a very different view of NM than what you think of from watching a Breaking Bad episode.

If you can be a little more specific I could get some better recommendations based off of that.

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Veyron
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby Veyron » Thu Nov 03, 2011 12:44 am

theavrock wrote:
Veyron wrote:Well, I won't be working in New Mexico any time soon but I'm thinking about a nice romantic weekend roadtrip with the SO over the next few months. Tips?


Depends on what you want.

For nice and romantic hit up Santa Fe or Taos if you want a little larger city style, but mainly you want to be in the mountains at a B&B.

If you want more big city where you can explore a more urban environment you could try Corrales and ABQ will be right there.

If you really want remote and romantic you could try Cimmaron, Red River, Jemez Springs or Angel Fire. All little mountain towns that will give you a very different view of NM than what you think of from watching a Breaking Bad episode.

If you can be a little more specific I could get some better recommendations based off of that.


Thinking of doing the artsy/native American scene. Maybe spaceport America too? Natural beauty we have in abundance back home.

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theavrock
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby theavrock » Thu Nov 03, 2011 8:54 am

Veyron wrote:
theavrock wrote:
Veyron wrote:Well, I won't be working in New Mexico any time soon but I'm thinking about a nice romantic weekend roadtrip with the SO over the next few months. Tips?


Depends on what you want.

For nice and romantic hit up Santa Fe or Taos if you want a little larger city style, but mainly you want to be in the mountains at a B&B.

If you want more big city where you can explore a more urban environment you could try Corrales and ABQ will be right there.

If you really want remote and romantic you could try Cimmaron, Red River, Jemez Springs or Angel Fire. All little mountain towns that will give you a very different view of NM than what you think of from watching a Breaking Bad episode.

If you can be a little more specific I could get some better recommendations based off of that.


Thinking of doing the artsy/native American scene. Maybe spaceport America too? Natural beauty we have in abundance back home.


Santa Fe would probably be your best bet then. It's definitely more "artsy" than abq and will give you a better variety than any of the other smaller towns I suggested. Art isn't my thing so I didn't spend a ton of time in Santa Fe but if that's what you're looking for its a great place.

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Veyron
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby Veyron » Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:47 am

theavrock wrote:
Veyron wrote:
theavrock wrote:
Veyron wrote:Well, I won't be working in New Mexico any time soon but I'm thinking about a nice romantic weekend roadtrip with the SO over the next few months. Tips?


Depends on what you want.

For nice and romantic hit up Santa Fe or Taos if you want a little larger city style, but mainly you want to be in the mountains at a B&B.

If you want more big city where you can explore a more urban environment you could try Corrales and ABQ will be right there.

If you really want remote and romantic you could try Cimmaron, Red River, Jemez Springs or Angel Fire. All little mountain towns that will give you a very different view of NM than what you think of from watching a Breaking Bad episode.

If you can be a little more specific I could get some better recommendations based off of that.


Thinking of doing the artsy/native American scene. Maybe spaceport America too? Natural beauty we have in abundance back home.


Santa Fe would probably be your best bet then. It's definitely more "artsy" than abq and will give you a better variety than any of the other smaller towns I suggested. Art isn't my thing so I didn't spend a ton of time in Santa Fe but if that's what you're looking for its a great place.


Yah, thats what I was thinking. Also had a colleague who went over there and she really liked it. Anything in particular we should do/see there?

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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby BeautifulSW » Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:58 am

There might be some open ski areas. The snow showed up early this year.

Santa Fe is "artsy" all right but it is also largely fake. Not sayin' "Don't bother"; S.F. is still quaint in a Disney-esque sort of way and there are plenty of good restaurants and museums. You can also buy genuine Navajo and Pueblo silver-and-tourquois jewelry.

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Veyron
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby Veyron » Thu Nov 03, 2011 10:02 am

BeautifulSW wrote:There might be some open ski areas. The snow showed up early this year.

Santa Fe is "artsy" all right but it is also largely fake. Not sayin' "Don't bother"; S.F. is still quaint in a Disney-esque sort of way and there are plenty of good restaurants and museums. You can also buy genuine Navajo and Pueblo silver-and-tourquois jewelry.


Are there more out of the way Native American areas worth seeing, preferably in the western part of the state? What is worth seeing in Santa Fe?

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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby BeautifulSW » Thu Nov 03, 2011 11:29 am

Well...sure. There are several pueblos that exclude outsiders and others that charge admission. Frankly, unless there's something actually going on, a dance or ritual that is open to the public (which many are not), there's not much reason to visit one. An exception is Sky City/Acoma Pueblo on I-40 west of Albuquerque which is worth a visit almost anytime they're open. The pueblo is built on top of a butte and looks much as it did when Lamy was Bishop.

Things to see/do in Northern N.Mex. (aside from sampling the local heroin, I mean...) Like an earlier poster said, it depends on what you want to do. My favorite places to eat in Santa Fe may not all exist anymore but I was very fond of the Blue Corn Cafe off San Francisco Street. Also The Shed if you want something more sophisticated and expensive. If you like opera (I don't) and it's during the season, the Santa Fe Opera is allegedly world famous.

Outdoor adventures depend on the season...there's kayaking, skiing, biking, hiking, hunting, fishing. The usual. There's also some mild to moderate mountaineering. Our highest peaks are what Coloradans call "Thirteeners".

If you like trains, you can ride the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, a coal fired narrow gauge operation that terminates in Chama. Worth it, too...it's the goods. Another trip I haven't taken is to ride the freight (mixed) train on the Santa Fe Southern between Lamy and Santa Fe. That was never a passenger route so it is slow and winding with (I'm told) fantastic views. Antiquing is said to be good, if not in Santa Fe, then in various 19th century small towns throughout the Northern central part of the state such as Cimmeron and Raton.

Los Alamos is absolutely worth a visit. It's where they developed the Atomic Bomb but there's also Bandelier National Monument some of our best preserved ruins.

I've never "done" Gallup though I've often thought it would be fun to live there. Basically, Gallup is the commercial interface between the Navajo Nation and the rest of the world. It is also a center for several pueblos including the rather unique Zuni. You used to be able to go to Shalako but I understand that the Zunis have now closed it to the public. Too bad but they were getting overrun. White people can sometimes get really weird around Native Americans.

Lots and lots of history for the tracing if that's your thing. Hot Springs, too, some developed and highway accessible others you have to hike to.

Go online through the state web site. Tourism is big business and the state spends a ton of money attracting visitors to NORTHERN New Mexico. Growl.

Or....you could buck the trend and visit the El Paso/Las Cruces area...MAJOR cool...Whites Sands National Monument, more skiing this year, a real artists' community, also the usual historic, cultural, and recreational possibilities and Old Mexico just over the border. :wink:

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Veyron
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby Veyron » Thu Nov 03, 2011 12:00 pm

BeautifulSW wrote:Well...sure. There are several pueblos that exclude outsiders and others that charge admission. Frankly, unless there's something actually going on, a dance or ritual that is open to the public (which many are not), there's not much reason to visit one. An exception is Sky City/Acoma Pueblo on I-40 west of Albuquerque which is worth a visit almost anytime they're open. The pueblo is built on top of a butte and looks much as it did when Lamy was Bishop.

Things to see/do in Northern N.Mex. (aside from sampling the local heroin, I mean...) Like an earlier poster said, it depends on what you want to do. My favorite places to eat in Santa Fe may not all exist anymore but I was very fond of the Blue Corn Cafe off San Francisco Street. Also The Shed if you want something more sophisticated and expensive. If you like opera (I don't) and it's during the season, the Santa Fe Opera is allegedly world famous.

Outdoor adventures depend on the season...there's kayaking, skiing, biking, hiking, hunting, fishing. The usual. There's also some mild to moderate mountaineering. Our highest peaks are what Coloradans call "Thirteeners".

If you like trains, you can ride the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, a coal fired narrow gauge operation that terminates in Chama. Worth it, too...it's the goods. Another trip I haven't taken is to ride the freight (mixed) train on the Santa Fe Southern between Lamy and Santa Fe. That was never a passenger route so it is slow and winding with (I'm told) fantastic views. Antiquing is said to be good, if not in Santa Fe, then in various 19th century small towns throughout the Northern central part of the state such as Cimmeron and Raton.

Los Alamos is absolutely worth a visit. It's where they developed the Atomic Bomb but there's also Bandelier National Monument some of our best preserved ruins.

I've never "done" Gallup though I've often thought it would be fun to live there. Basically, Gallup is the commercial interface between the Navajo Nation and the rest of the world. It is also a center for several pueblos including the rather unique Zuni. You used to be able to go to Shalako but I understand that the Zunis have now closed it to the public. Too bad but they were getting overrun. White people can sometimes get really weird around Native Americans.

Lots and lots of history for the tracing if that's your thing. Hot Springs, too, some developed and highway accessible others you have to hike to.

Go online through the state web site. Tourism is big business and the state spends a ton of money attracting visitors to NORTHERN New Mexico. Growl.

Or....you could buck the trend and visit the El Paso/Las Cruces area...MAJOR cool...Whites Sands National Monument, more skiing this year, a real artists' community, also the usual historic, cultural, and recreational possibilities and Old Mexico just over the border. :wink:


Sweet, visiting Los Alamos sounds very romantic (or at least it will by the time I get done thinking of how to present it). That, Sky City/Acoma, and SF sound like it would make a nice weekend.

But first, we hike Havasupai falls. Best ... region ... ever.

BeautifulSW
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Re: New Mexican Law

Postby BeautifulSW » Thu Nov 03, 2011 1:57 pm

I hiked to Havasupai some years ago, just after a major flood "lowered" the Falls a noticeable chunk. There have been floods since that altered the Falls even further. Nevertheless, I'm sure it's still worth the ten miles from Hilltop to the village.

Couple points:

-DO make a reservation. The last flood damaged their tourist facilities and I don't know how able they are to absorb unannounced guests.

-DO hike further down the canyon from the campground but DON'T try to reach the Colorado. Some folks have tried it at times and found that they couldn't scramble back up. Helicopter rescue is expensive.

-DO swim in the pools. FREEZING but lovely.

-DON'T use the horses/mules. You hiked IN, dammit, now hike OUT! :twisted:

I remember when my then-new wife and I emerged at Hilltop to be greeted by my '71 VW Bus, we had just one thing in mind; a large steak dinner in Flagstaff! Funny, though...fifteen years later, I've been climbing out of the Grand Canyon in all sorts of weather, no problem. The Havasupai Trail isn't SUPPOSED to be harder than Bright Angel, is it? A little longer, maybe, but much less vertical distance.

Oh, and are you going to visit the new visitor center on the rim? Where you walk out over the canyon on a glass-floored loop and stare DOWN? Brrrr!

Edit: I miss that old Bus, come to think of it.




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