2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

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FlanSolo
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby FlanSolo » Mon Jul 11, 2011 4:10 pm

Stats:
LSAT: 160, 168 / LSAC GPA: 3.11 / Decent softs, Strong 3+ Years WE
Took October test, retook in December

Applied to:
GULC, a number of schools 18-35

What were your expectations going in?
Realistic, I think. I did a fair amount of research here and used LSN, so I basically knew that my future as a splitter was uncertain. I will say that I did not anticipate getting waitlisted as much as I did with my solid WE and LSAT generally around 75th percentile for nearly all the schools I applied to.

How did things turn out? AND How did you make your decision?
I got in or got in off the waitlist just about everywhere I applied (only reject was from BC). I was originally going to take money at WUSTL, but given that I wanted to stay on the east coast and also eventually start a family with current SO who's going to W&M, it made more sense to go to GW at quasi-sticker (I'm living at home, so no rent/groceries/utilities).

What did you feel you did right?
Just about nothing by TLS standards.

What would you do differently?
Just about everything. My cycle is a virtual litany of TLS sins. To wit:

-I did a fair amount of LSAT prep and PT'ed in the 167-171 range, but was too satisfied with my score and didn't do as much prep as I should have (I gave myself 2.5 months while working a full-time, "real" job). On average, I missed about 4-5 questions on LG and I definitely should have put in more work improving that.

-I was insanely nervous and completely shat the bed on the October test. I'm not sure what I could have done differently to get myself mentally ready, but taking some proctored practice tests probably would have been a good idea.

-Because I shat the bed on the October test, I waited to get my December before applying and wound up getting everything in just before the March deadline. This almost definitely contributed to my "tour de waitlist." This was compounded by my refusal to use the additional time to do anything but "maintain" my score. I basically let 2-3 months go by where I took 3 or 4 PTs and a handfull of practice sections. This was a huge missed opportunity ...which brings me to my next point...

-I did not bother to learn much about the application process - let alone legal market - until I was actually applying. Thus, I didn't have the right perspective on anything I was doing until it was too late to do anything about it.

General tips from your experience?
-It goes without saying, but do everything in your power to maximize your LSAT score. A lot of people make the mistaken assumption that something about their application makes them "different," and that this factor will account for some other deficiency, but in most circumstances you are not a beautiful snowflake and most of the decision is going to come down to your numbers. A higher LSAT can not only mean the difference between schools, but also how much you'll need to invest in your education. The importance of the LSAT really cannot be overstated.
-Familiarize yourself with the application process from the start.

Lord Randolph McDuff
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby Lord Randolph McDuff » Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:45 pm

southernsnapp wrote:What were your expectations going in?

3.5, 158, URM
Before the LSAT, I expected it to be as simple and carefree as applying to undergrad. I was practice testing in the 170s each time. Test anxiety? Idk. After, I expected to work at the place I was interning. I applied to Chicago, NYU, Cornell, BU, UGA, Ga State, UHouston, USC, Alabama, Indiana, Miami, Loyola LA, GMU, Cardozo, Vanderbilt, and some other places I can't remember. Also I retook the LSAT in Dec. I ended up spending 750+ on apps.

How did things turn out?

The exact opposite, but with a happy ending. I was waitlisted at Chicago, which gave me hope! I didn't write a LOCI because I really want to study abroad again. I was close to committing to Alabama after their great scholarship and impressive recruiting. However, In March I was accepted to Cornell and received a good amount of money. I was waitlisted at
GMU, Houston, and Vanderbilt.
How did you make your decision?

Cornell has everything I want except a good climate. With the money it was a no-brainer. The money from Alabama was really tempting, but it just wasn't the school for me.

What did you feel you did right?

My resume was pretty fantastic. Lots of languages, part time jobs while in school, study abroad, volunteering, organizations. All in 3 years. My personal statement matched my
resume, and I hear from people that my ps and ds were really good. Had to make a big effort after that lsat score lol
.

Also, I was told by my pre law advisor to aim for low schools. In appts with her I'd talk
about Cornell, UNC, Chicago, and she would tell me I need to apply to Santa Clara and other schools that just weren't what I wanted. Which is why I ended up applying to Miami, GSU, etc. I know that's where my numbers put me, but I told her if I didn't get into a school I'd be happy at, I'd just wait and go later. She told me I shouldn't aim so high because even if I got in a T14, I would't get money. Apparently not!

I also worked harder and pulled my first all nighter of college during the fall I was applying, just to make sure I got good grades. Idk if that helped or not, but Cornell did have a chance to see them. But it did make me feel better.

What would you do differently?

I did a lot of prep for the lsat, idk what else I would do. I would decide exactly what I want
in a law school before deciding to apply. Houston, GMU, Ga State, and some others were complete wastes of time.
I'd probably put more effort in some of the classes I got B's in, and the 2 I got C's in, even though I hated those classes with a passion.


I wouldn't act so crazy. My closest friends probably hated me because I was always worried over something regarding law school. When I told them I was going to Cornell I got a bunch of itoldyousos.

General tips from your experience?

1. Go where you want. No matter what your parents, friends, etc say. You'll have to do the work and it's your education.
2. Plan.
3. Don't listen to negativity.
4. Try not to get stressed out.
5. Begin with the end in mind. (from 7 habits lol) In November, I was thinking about how at my graduation party I'd announce my law school. Those types of happy thoughts kept me going.
6. Don't be afraid to ask for help. I had plenty of people read my personal statement and diversity statement.


Lol at the bolded.

Listen sweety, not to be a patronizing dick, but you had success getting into law schools because you are a URM. Your resume is shit, you numbers are very average, and if your PS was anything like the rambling nonsense above (you didn't want to write an LOCI to Chicago because you "really wanted to do study abroad again???") it was probably painful to read and likely way out of touch with reality. Not that it would matter, as LS admissions is a numbers game-- URMS compete with other URMS based on their numbers so long as there are no red flags in the files.

I'm actually saying this to help you because clarity is the greatest gift there is. You got in because you are a URM. Figure that out and then try to look out at the world with the fewest amount of personal biases and irrational emotions obstructing your vision. A sincere good luck to you, you will definitely need it at Cornell.

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Flips88
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby Flips88 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:51 pm

Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:
southernsnapp wrote:What were your expectations going in?

3.5, 158, URM
Before the LSAT, I expected it to be as simple and carefree as applying to undergrad. I was practice testing in the 170s each time. Test anxiety? Idk. After, I expected to work at the place I was interning. I applied to Chicago, NYU, Cornell, BU, UGA, Ga State, UHouston, USC, Alabama, Indiana, Miami, Loyola LA, GMU, Cardozo, Vanderbilt, and some other places I can't remember. Also I retook the LSAT in Dec. I ended up spending 750+ on apps.

How did things turn out?

The exact opposite, but with a happy ending. I was waitlisted at Chicago, which gave me hope! I didn't write a LOCI because I really want to study abroad again. I was close to committing to Alabama after their great scholarship and impressive recruiting. However, In March I was accepted to Cornell and received a good amount of money. I was waitlisted at
GMU, Houston, and Vanderbilt.
How did you make your decision?

Cornell has everything I want except a good climate. With the money it was a no-brainer. The money from Alabama was really tempting, but it just wasn't the school for me.

What did you feel you did right?

My resume was pretty fantastic. Lots of languages, part time jobs while in school, study abroad, volunteering, organizations. All in 3 years. My personal statement matched my
resume, and I hear from people that my ps and ds were really good. Had to make a big effort after that lsat score lol
.

Also, I was told by my pre law advisor to aim for low schools. In appts with her I'd talk
about Cornell, UNC, Chicago, and she would tell me I need to apply to Santa Clara and other schools that just weren't what I wanted. Which is why I ended up applying to Miami, GSU, etc. I know that's where my numbers put me, but I told her if I didn't get into a school I'd be happy at, I'd just wait and go later. She told me I shouldn't aim so high because even if I got in a T14, I would't get money. Apparently not!

I also worked harder and pulled my first all nighter of college during the fall I was applying, just to make sure I got good grades. Idk if that helped or not, but Cornell did have a chance to see them. But it did make me feel better.

What would you do differently?

I did a lot of prep for the lsat, idk what else I would do. I would decide exactly what I want
in a law school before deciding to apply. Houston, GMU, Ga State, and some others were complete wastes of time.
I'd probably put more effort in some of the classes I got B's in, and the 2 I got C's in, even though I hated those classes with a passion.


I wouldn't act so crazy. My closest friends probably hated me because I was always worried over something regarding law school. When I told them I was going to Cornell I got a bunch of itoldyousos.

General tips from your experience?

1. Go where you want. No matter what your parents, friends, etc say. You'll have to do the work and it's your education.
2. Plan.
3. Don't listen to negativity.
4. Try not to get stressed out.
5. Begin with the end in mind. (from 7 habits lol) In November, I was thinking about how at my graduation party I'd announce my law school. Those types of happy thoughts kept me going.
6. Don't be afraid to ask for help. I had plenty of people read my personal statement and diversity statement.


Lol at the bolded.

Listen sweety, not to be a patronizing dick, but you had success getting into law schools because you are a URM. Your resume is shit, you numbers are very average, and if your PS was anything like the rambling nonsense above (you didn't want to write an LOCI to Chicago because you "really wanted to do study abroad again???") it was probably painful to read and likely way out of touch with reality. Not that it would matter, as LS admissions is a numbers game-- URMS compete with other URMS based on their numbers so long as there are no red flags in the files.

I'm actually saying this to help you because clarity is the greatest gift there is. You got in because you are a URM. Figure that out and then try to look out at the world with the fewest amount of personal biases and irrational emotions obstructing your vision. A sincere good luck to you, you will definitely need it at Cornell.

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SchopenhauerFTW
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby SchopenhauerFTW » Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:59 pm

Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:Not to be a patronizing dick, but I am one.

fingersxd
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby fingersxd » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:46 pm

Can't exactly be blamed for being mad though - 3.5/158? Think about how many candidates (myself included) got dinged with #'s WAAAAY better than that and good softs.

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beachbum
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby beachbum » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:55 pm

This just in: life isn't fair. Do better on the LSAT.

Lord Randolph McDuff
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby Lord Randolph McDuff » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:56 pm

I sound mad. I dunno, it's really just her obvious lack of perception of the world around her that gets to me. I am a pro affirmative action guy.

Her low LSAT will make it hard to compete, but her naivity about the situation she's about to find herself in pretty much assures me she will be at the bottom of the class.

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Flips88
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby Flips88 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:57 pm

fingersxd wrote:Can't exactly be blamed for being mad though - 3.5/158? Think about how many candidates (myself included) got dinged with #'s WAAAAY better than that and good softs.

Considering that LSP gives a deny for a URM with 3.5/158 at Cornell, it'd seem like the softs did make a difference.

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bk1
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby bk1 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:59 pm

Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:it's really just her obvious lack of perception of the world around her that gets to me.


We were all like this with regards to the application process at one point. You also went (and are still going) about it like a douche.

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bk1
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby bk1 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:05 pm

Flips88 wrote:
fingersxd wrote:Can't exactly be blamed for being mad though - 3.5/158? Think about how many candidates (myself included) got dinged with #'s WAAAAY better than that and good softs.

Considering that LSP gives a deny for a URM with 3.5/158 at Cornell, it'd seem like the softs did make a difference.


Dude, just no with the LSP stuff. You realize how few data points there are for URMs? Not to mention that URMs in general (and especially ones with those numbers) tend to apply to the wrong range of schools. A quick LSN search reveals that barely any URMs with those numbers applied to the T14 but I saw at least one other that got a similar sized scholarship to UPenn.

I think this person is a great indicator of two things: (1) how atrocious and harmful law school advisers are and can be, and (2) that URMs tend to misapply at a greater rate than non-URMs.

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Flips88
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby Flips88 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:08 pm

bk1 wrote:
Flips88 wrote:
fingersxd wrote:Can't exactly be blamed for being mad though - 3.5/158? Think about how many candidates (myself included) got dinged with #'s WAAAAY better than that and good softs.

Considering that LSP gives a deny for a URM with 3.5/158 at Cornell, it'd seem like the softs did make a difference.


Dude, just no with the LSP stuff. You realize how few data points there are for URMs? Not to mention that URMs in general (and especially ones with those numbers) tend to apply to the wrong range of schools. A quick LSN search reveals that barely any URMs with those numbers applied to the T14 but I saw at least one other that got a similar sized scholarship to UPenn.

I think this person is a great indicator of two things: (1) how atrocious and harmful law school advisers are and can be, and (2) that URMs tend to misapply at a greater rate than non-URMs.

You mean people apply to 'Bama for reasons other than the free iTunes?

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bk1
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby bk1 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:11 pm

Flips88 wrote:You mean people apply to 'Bama for reasons other than the free iTunes?


Birmingham biglawl?

dabbadon8
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby dabbadon8 » Sat Jul 23, 2011 9:28 pm

Anyone out there who just completed their cycle (or a current student) who would like to share?

delusional
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby delusional » Sun Jul 24, 2011 6:55 pm

178/3.85 - Not as good as it looks though - I wasn't sure what to expect because I am older, took years to graduate undergrad, and had a lot of weird credits.
What were your expectations going in?
Married with kids and a house and jobs, I had the goal of getting into a T14 near me (UPenn) with as much money as possible. I hoped for a low-mid 170's LSAT to make that possible; fortunately, I realized that the only way to achieve it was to aim for a 180. I had to cancel my first LSAT because I think it was like a 168. I kept studying, and got a 178 on the second try. At that point, I was hoping for a full ride from Penn or Columbia or NYU.

How did things turned out?
On the downside, I had to apply late because of the retake. I think that affected how I did, if not acceptance-wise, then financially. I got into Columbia first and loved the ASW, but the cost was unconscionable. I got into Harvard, which I had felt I needed to apply to, but I had no plans of moving at that point. I still held out hope that Penn would come through with big money. In the meantime, I was put in touch with a friend-of-a-friend at Harvard, who explained to me how the need-based aid worked. In the end, need based at Harvard was the most generous scholarship I received - even after I got a decent scholarship from Penn and negotiated up to about 50%.
How did you make your decision?
I was torn between family stability at UPenn, and picking up and moving to Boston for Harvard. Penn also would have involved about 30% less debt, because I wouldn't have needed to move, and my wife would have kept her good job. I think that the demeanor of the students at the two schools, combined with LIPP, is what made me decide on Harvard. The students at Penn seemed to have a desperate edge that the ones I met at H didn't have. (This might also be because of what was going on in school at the time - H had finished finals and Penn was still in the middle. But everyone at H was totally chilled when I mentioned jobs, and at Penn they were uptight and cynical.)

What did you feel you did right?
There was a little luck involved, as my first cancellation shows, but killing myself for the LSAT was a great decision.

Also, my general results were a mixed bag (compared to my numbers), so I don't know what I did well and what I did poorly. I thought my PS was good, but I didn't get in to NYU, Umich, UVA, or NU. Was that straight YP, or was there something I missed? I'm not sure. Since it seems like 400% of the people on TLS who got H also got a Hamilton, I wonder if there was something wrong there as well.

What would you do differently?
I wasn't able to apply earlier. I started studying in May, and I had to take it twice. That said, I think I was hurt a little financially due to late applications. I'm thrilled to be going to Harvard (although right now, surrounded by boxes that I will have to load on a UHaul, thinking of all the other things that need doing before I move next week and rent out my beloved house to strangers, while my kids leave behind all their close friends,) but I wonder if I would have been better off at Penn with under $100,000 in debt, trading child rearing tips with r6_Philly.
General tips from your experience?
Unless you are a gambler or pro athlete the LSAT is the best chance you will ever have to make huge money in a short time. Don't waste the opportunity.

One other thing that I suspect may have helped me was having someone who really knew me and took an interest in me write an LOR for me. He was not a traditional choice, but I didn't have many traditional options, and I think he may have helped to make up for the educational and other oddities on my resume.

I had numbers that looked good for a lot of scholarship money, but I wonder if schools look for a resume in addition to numbers when they allocate their financial aid.

If you're not sure what transcripts you need, err on the side of caution. I had a hell of a wait for my last transcript from an overseas school that ended up being for no credit - but LSAC still wouldn't send my reports to the schools without it.

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japes
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby japes » Sun Jul 24, 2011 8:45 pm

167/3.8
Accepted: Texas, Cornell
WL reject: Columbia, Michigan
Reject: Harvard, Berkeley

What were your expectations going in?
I felt like I had a much stronger app than I did - I thought I had great chances at Mich and Columbia and had at least a shot at Harvard and Berkeley. This was, of course, without too much research until after I'd put in my apps.

How did things turn out?
I was initially kind of disappointed with some of the results - the WL at Mich surprised me given that my numbers gave me what I felt was a better than even chance. In the end, I'm happy to be going to a great law school with a decent scholarship, and working a law job these past 6 months has me sure that I'm doing the right thing.

How did you make your decision?
Texas gave me more money than Cornell, and the COA totals around $50k less. That made it pretty easy given that I don't want biglaw at all.

What did you feel you did right?
Scholarship negotiation. I got much more money out of Texas than I expected thanks to negotiations and it made it a very easy decision for me.

What would you do differently?
I'd have applied more broadly - I didn't know that I could ask for fee waivers. I also would probably have retaken, and studied more for the LSAT - my first practice test was a 172 and I let that give me the feeling that I had it made. I also would have tried to find a more interesting experience for the 9-month gap I had between UG and LS. I'm working a law job, which is nice, but I'd have liked to travel.

General tips from your experience?
Make sure your LSAT is the best it can be. There is no shame in an October retake. And don't be afraid to negotiate. I got a good scholarship out of it.

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wamanda
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby wamanda » Sun Jul 24, 2011 10:10 pm

http://lawschoolnumbers.com/wamanda

168/3.92, above average softs and LORs

What were your expectations going in?
Not too many expectations. I did not do proper research before diving into this whole thing. Basically, I was set on Berkeley. I figured if I didn't get in there, I would go to a local school with a full ride. I decided to apply to other top schools just out of curiosity/the saving grace of fee waivers and had no idea what I was doing until I started reading TLS.

How did things turned out?
In retrospect, actually a lot better than I should have expected. At first, I was disheartened, I got waitlisted at every T14, expect for my rejections from NYU and Harvard (I expected this from H, but was crossing my fingers for NYU). Ultimately though, I learned many of the tips and tricks this board has to offer, stayed on waitlists until the bitter end, and ended up getting off every single waitlist I was on (except, of course, Berkeley's :roll: ). Also thanks to this board, I learned how to negotiate and ended up with ridiculous scholarship offers from most schools I applied to. In the end, I turned down a half-scholarship from Michigan for a full-ride plus living stipend from UCLA. This outcome had seemed impossible at the beginning of my cycle, when I was disheartened from so many WL decisions.

How did you make your decision?
Well, I asked for advice on here, did all the research that I should have done before applying, and realized that coming out of law school debt free would ultimately be the best advantage for me to have as a PI attorney. Also, UCLA's admissions staff is just amazing (and extremely compelling...).

What did you feel you did right?
I wrote a great personal statement. I kept up some good softs and presented them well in my application. I stayed in on WLs until the bitter end and was relatively active with LOCIs. When it came time, I interviewed well with Admissions Deans on the phone. I also forked out the money to visit several law schools, which is incredibly important, although I wish I had visited in fall rather than spring. One thing I accidentally did right was apply to all the schools that gave me fee waivers. I hadn't planned on applying to most of these schools until they sent me waivers (including my ultimate top two options, UCLA and Michigan). Not only should you apply to as many top schools as possible to have viable options, but it also helps with leverage during later negotiations. Most of all, what I really did right was knowing when and how to ask for more money (often and politely but forcefully)!

What would you do differently?
So, so much.
First, I would have studied for the goddamned LSAT. I originally PTed at 168, noticed it was the median at Berkeley, and figured a minimal amount of studying would bring me up enough to be a sure shot with my GPA. WRONG. Although I ended up only studying for ~50 hours (stupid, stupid move), I feel pretty certain my PT was inflated. I definitely learned some solid LSAT skills in the short time I studied, but in the stress of the actual test, the fast pace got me and I ended up filling in 8 answers of one section with B (I could have gotten a 176!!). Definitely, definitely practice more. Take it seriously. Berkeley would have been begging for me with a higher LSAT, and I would have had a good shot at HYS.
Second, I would have actually applied early. I thought December/January was pretty early but, as this board later taught me, it most definitely is not. I should have finished all my apps by November at the latest. I bet I would have avoided several of these waitlists if I had been early.
Third, I would be sure to write "Why ___?" essays. I think that is another reason for my vast waitlisting, especially at the schools that later accepted me with a scholarship.
Finally, I would have done much more research before applying. My application process was very sloppy. I ended up getting lucky and having some pretty good options, but I know I could have gotten into most any school I wanted (read: Berkeley and NYU) if I had actually studied for the LSAT and followed the general application advice on TLS. In fact, until my scholarship negotiations paid off, I was set on retaking and applying next year.

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Blessedassurance
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby Blessedassurance » Sun Jul 24, 2011 11:01 pm

Lord Randolph McDuff wrote:I sound am mad. I dunno, it's really just her obvious lack of perception of the world around her the fact that she got into a T14 with her numbers that gets to me. I am a pro affirmative action guy have black friends.

Blah blah blah yada yada yada ouchi ouchi walla walla.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DsPrEcvIvI

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JoeFish
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby JoeFish » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:05 am

177/3.35, average softs

Expectations going in: None at all. I looked at schools' profiles and websites to get a feel for where I could go; I was PTing 172, so the 177 was a touch of a pleasant surprise.

How did things turn out?: A touch worse than I had hoped, but my cycle was mostly self-limiting. Ended up taking $$$ from UIUC. This is not to say that I'm not happy to be going there - I fell in love with it when I visited, and think I'll feel pretty much at home, but I probably could have objectively done better with my cycle had I known about TLS prior.

How did you make your decision?: Three schools I got into were far and away my top 3, and so it came down to geography and money. I'm not Big Law or bust, and wouldn't mind working in a city, but will be more than happy with a quiet 60k in a suburban place. Illinois is where I'll be most comfortable over the next three years, and my comfort level is a big factor in how well I do.

Even with a 177, I didn't want a T14 if it wasn't the right fit. I wanted to be in the north-east quarter of the country, did not desire to go to LS in a city, and didn't have work experience. With a 3.35, that left Michigan, Virginia, Duke, and Cornell. It was a mistake to not apply to all of these, because I could have seen myself going to any of them (maybe not Duke), but I didn't know I would have a legitimate shot at these at the time. I figured that even if I did get in, I'd have no shot at scholarship money, and I absolutely would not have gone anywhere at which I would have needed to take out more than $120,000.

Also of note, perhaps: when I was WLed at certain schools, I withdrew immediately. I'm not unhappy about that. I would've been miserable had I committed to UIUC while still waiting until mid-July to see if I got off the list at UVA.

What did you feel you did right?: Visited all the schools I got into, made a choice I was extremely happy with, got a big scholarship, mauled the LSATs after 6 or 7 PTs.

What would you have done differently?: Applied to Michigan and Cornell.

Honestly, probably waited a year, and applied early. My applications were sent out between January 3rd and 12th, which was too late too late too late, even though a few schools such as IUB and GW (another thing I wouldn't have done: applied to GW, because I had no intention of going there) accepted me within a week of receiving my apps. Ultimately got 6 acceptances and 6 WLs; if I had applied on September first, or maybe even November first, I think it might've been 8-4.

So, all in all, really happy to be going to UIUC, but could've had a slightly better cycle, if only because I'd've had more options, if I had been a little more knowledgeable/found TLS before I committed.

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emkay625
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby emkay625 » Mon Jul 25, 2011 5:25 am

sanetruth wrote:We need [I would like to see] more splitters ITT


+1

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crossarmant
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby crossarmant » Mon Jul 25, 2011 11:28 am

Another T2 Edition

Stats
LSAT: 160
GPA: 2.34 (3.3 my freshman year, transferred, then a 2.12 from my degree granting school)


Applied to:
15 schools. Some safety TTTs in markets where they’re the only schools and I wouldn’t mind living (Maine, Montana, Vermont) and mostly a number to T2s where I was near or above the 75th percentile LSAT (Syracuse, both Rutgers, Richmond, Penn State, Seattle U, Denver, etc.). I was hoping that by having an LSAT in the top quarter, it’d make up for my abysmal GPA.


What were your expectations going in?
I was unsure of what to expect. When I took my LSAT I was pretty much feeling like the fact that my GPA was so low that my chances of going anywhere were next to nil. So, my study habits weren’t the best (Mostly interjected with getting bored and playing Pokemon). I told myself if I can get a 160 or better, I’d apply to law school. If not then I’d go back for another bachelors in Civil Engineering. I wanted to do law, worked in a family law firm and a corporate legal dept over the two years I was out of school. When I got my score back, I decided to apply and started reading TLS. I applied to better schools than I had originally thought possible with my GPA and hoped for the best.


How did things turned out?
Things turned out interesting. I was rejected by some very low ranked places and then given money at some T2s. All in all, I was pleased considering my GPA was barely passing. I wrote an addendum addressing my GPA, I went to Virginia Tech during the shootings and discussed the grades issues regarding that. All in all, I’m fairly pleased considering my stats however.


How did you make your decision?
My decision came down to a choice between University of Denver and Rutgers-Camden. I really wanted to move out west and live in Denver, but the job prospect and CoA were so high that it worried me. I was all set to attend when I got the financial aid/CoA report and saw the cost and got cold feet and went with Rutgers. Living in Camden isn’t ideal, but they have better placement, cheaper cost, offered me money, do pretty well in the Philly market, and it’s only 4 hours from my fiancée who’s finishing her Masters (Rather than 27 hours or some such time).


What did you feel you did right?
I feel that by actually coming onto TLS and looking over job prospects and discussion it made me realize that a cheaper state-school for T2s are the best choice.


What would you do differently?
A lot. I would’ve really studied for my LSAT for starters. I half assed it when I easily could’ve studied and scored well over a 165 or more, I was ignorant and just figured that my GPA would hold me back from almost anywhere.
I also would’ve applied much earlier. I applied on nearly the deadline for almost everywhere. I had Dec LSAT so I got the results in January and then took my sweet time deciding realistic schools and gathering LoRs.
I would’ve researched he whole process much earlier.
There’s a good part of me that’s debated with retaking and reapplying for next year, but even if I did do significantly better (which I know I could get at least a 168) I still feel that I would only score a marginally better school which wouldn’t be worth the extra year of killing time. That and if I did worse, then I’d be right back where I started except a year later and older.


General tips from your experience?
Apply early. Put everything you have into your LSAT. Cast a wide net and work for fee waivers. Thoroughly research the schools you’re interested in attending.
Last edited by crossarmant on Mon Jul 25, 2011 1:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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redsoxfan2495
Posts: 273
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Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby redsoxfan2495 » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:51 pm

http://lawschoolnumbers.com/redsoxfan2495

173/3.7 - Mediocre softs.

What were your expectations going in?

Originally I wanted to stay within New England. I thought I might have a shot at Harvard given that I had always done well on standardized tests. I figured that if I missed Harvard I'd go to BU or BC. After some time on TLS I decided to aim for higher ranked schools even if they were a bit further away. After the LSAT I knew that YHS was probably out of reach, so I was really hoping for CCN.

How did things turn out?

I'm pretty happy with the way things turned out. I got into 2/3 of CCN, and I really wasn't all that interested in Chicago anyway. I applied late, so I ended up getting tons of YP waitlists from the lower T14. This might've been a big problem if I'd been aiming for $$$ at a lower ranked school.

How did you make your decision?

I had the classic Columbia/NYU dilemma. The two seemed pretty close to even on the important stuff, so my choice basically came down to my experience at both ASWs. I found that I felt more comfortable at Columbia's campus and in the surrounding area. This probably has to do with the fact that I'm not from a city, so I liked the idea of a quieter neighborhood and actually having a campus to retreat to. At one point I leaned toward NYU because of my interest in PI, but I came to the conclusion that NYU's perceived PI advantage really had more to do with self-selection. I also must admit that I may have been swayed slightly by the Ivy League prestige factor.

What did you feel you did right?

Honestly, not much.

What would you do differently?

- I should have studied harder for the LSAT. I signed up for a course last summer but it ended up getting cancelled at the last minute. I tried to study between classes during fall semester, but I don't feel I was nearly as prepared as I could have been. I only took two timed prep tests before the real thing.

- I shouldn't have let myself get distracted by the admissions process. My last two semester of college weren't as good as they could have been largely because I was too concerned with applying to and hearing back from law schools. I should have gotten things out of the way early and been more focused.

- I should have planned for my LORs much earlier. I ended up having to ask a professor who didn't really know me all that well and who I'm sure wrote me a pretty generic letter.

- I should have begun work on my PS much sooner. I had no idea what to write about so I kept putting it off. I ended up writing it in the two days before the first application deadlines on February 1st. I didn't have anyone else critique it.

- I should have applied earlier. I sent in my apps only hours before deadlines.

General tips from your experience?

The advice I have basically boils down to getting an early start on each facet of your application. Long before you apply you should be building relationships with professors and figuring out who you want to write your LORs. Also, do a bit of research into what makes a good personal statement and begin thinking about what you could write about. Make sure you give LSAT prep the time it deserves. Use the LG Bible and try to take as many practice tests as you can under real conditions. Get your apps in as early as possible (without rushing, of course). There is no downside to this. You'll have a better shot at getting into school's where you're borderline, avoid YP's and get decisions sooner.

Good luck, everyone!

jgalgano
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2011 9:16 am

Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby jgalgano » Mon Jul 25, 2011 1:04 pm

Stats:
LSAT: 147 (1st time); 145 (2nd time); 155 (last time)
GPA: 3.76 (3.5 for AA; 3.9 for BS)
Graduate GPA: 3.9
Non-URM

Degrees are AA in Chemstry; BS in Polymer Science; and PhD in Chemical Engineering

About my LSATs: the first time I took while working on my dissertation, plus I am generally not good on standardized tests at all (SAT: 980; GRE: 1180). The 2nd time was because I did not cancel my score and I had bubbled an entire section wrong.

Schools I applied to: George Washington, Iowa, Ohio State, Wisconsin, Santa Clara, Depaul, Chicago-Kent, New Hampshire, and Richmond (was looking at IP law schools and the Midwest)

I was accepted to all of them except GW (rejection) and Wisconsin (WL). A little money from New Hampshire and Santa Clara but I think the latter gave me money because they felt bad it took them from October to April to make a decision on my application.

Was it what I expected? No, I was happily surprised with my acceptances. In reality I was gearing up for harsh winters and $40+ K tuition of New Hampshire. Instead I had the choice of 20+K in either Iowa or Ohio State (I chose Iowa)! Still bad winters but higher prestige at a much better price.

What benefited me?: My age and experience for sure. It helped that I have worked in the real world for a couple of years and that I took a year off between my admission cycles. My personal statements also helped quite a bit.

What would I do differently?: I wish I had made the decision about law school sometime sooner. I am happy I went for and earned my PhD, and it will help me in patent law in the future. The problem was I made the decision my final year and did not have the time to prepare better. I am excited about how things turned out and am looking forward to starting in a couple of weeks.

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JDndMSW
Posts: 602
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2011 4:32 am

Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby JDndMSW » Tue Aug 23, 2011 11:44 pm

BUMP cause I could use some inspiration right now :/

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Bildungsroman
Posts: 5548
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:42 pm

Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby Bildungsroman » Wed Aug 24, 2011 1:30 am

http://lawschoolnumbers.com/Bildungsroman

168/4.05 - Decent softs and a PS that took me about 2 hours from start to finish

What were your expectations going in?
That I'd probably be going to WUSTL with some baller cash.

How did things turned out?
Fucking awesome. Got into GULC and Cornell and decided on the latter; was pretty happy but not totally satisfied with where I ended up. Then, after moving to Ithaca, I got into Chicago off the WL. Chicago was my first choice school, so of course I made the switch.

How did you make your decision?
I decided on Cornell because it places well and Ithaca sounded nice. When I got into Chicago, it was a no-brainer: the best school in its city, one of the few best schools in the country, fantastic placement, preftigious faculty, matched my small Cornell scholarship, know people in the city. I would have taken Chicago over any other school besides Yale and maybe Stanford, so the decision was easy.

What did you feel you did right?
I made my LOCI to Chicago show how desperate I was. I had a baller GPA.

What would you do differently?
Put more work into my PS. Applied to Virginia, Penn, and Duke (and applied to Berkeley and NYU earlier than late December). Take a few more PTs to see if I could raise my score.

General tips from your experience?
Don't fucking do Early Decision unless you absolutely have to. Don't procrastinate on getting your supplemental essays done.

User avatar
RaleighStClair
Posts: 482
Joined: Tue May 24, 2011 12:10 am

Re: 2011 Reflect on your cycle thread

Postby RaleighStClair » Wed Aug 24, 2011 2:04 am

Bildungsroman wrote:http://lawschoolnumbers.com/Bildungsroman

168/4.05 - Decent softs and a PS that took me about 2 hours from start to finish

What were your expectations going in?
That I'd probably be going to WUSTL with some baller cash.

How did things turned out?
Fucking awesome. Got into GULC and Cornell and decided on the latter; was pretty happy but not totally satisfied with where I ended up. Then, after moving to Ithaca, I got into Chicago off the WL. Chicago was my first choice school, so of course I made the switch.

How did you make your decision?
I decided on Cornell because it places well and Ithaca sounded nice. When I got into Chicago, it was a no-brainer: the best school in its city, one of the few best schools in the country, fantastic placement, preftigious faculty, matched my small Cornell scholarship, know people in the city. I would have taken Chicago over any other school besides Yale and maybe Stanford, so the decision was easy.

What did you feel you did right?
I made my LOCI to Chicago show how desperate I was. I had a baller GPA.

What would you do differently?
Put more work into my PS. Applied to Virginia, Penn, and Duke (and applied to Berkeley and NYU earlier than late December). Take a few more PTs to see if I could raise my score.

General tips from your experience?
Don't fucking do Early Decision unless you absolutely have to. Don't procrastinate on getting your supplemental essays done.


Pretty dope cycle. Congrats on Chi.




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