Should I withdraw?

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sanrenxing
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:24 pm

Should I withdraw?

Postby sanrenxing » Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:53 pm

Hi everyone.

I've received a financial package from USC that I'm happy with. It's not perfect, but it doesn't terrify me.... let's just say it's do-able. Meanwhile I've received a full ride from a T30 school and I've gotten into UT.

Problem: I had thought that my original plan in applying to law school was a solid one - wrap up undergrad this year and apply to schools, then defer for a year to work so I can take out less loans during school and get some really good volunteering in. Maybe travel or teach English abroad. But mainly get my life together and take a breath before diving right back into school.

In a perfect world, I would negotiate with USC a bit with the full ride and UT acceptance, maybe they'd give me a little bump, and then defer and work for that year. But I'm sure that that's a ridiculous expectation. I have a feeling I have to pick my battles - should I put all my energy into trying to defer with the scholarship I already have to USC? Or should I grow a pair, try and negotiate, and then AFTER that also try and defer? Or, knowing that I simply am not ready to go back to school, should I gamble by withdrawing and reapplying next year and cross my fingers that I get the same scholarship?

This is a difficult decision, to say the least. I really appreciate everyone's help.

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bk1
Posts: 18407
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:06 pm

Re: Should I withdraw?

Postby bk1 » Mon Mar 28, 2011 4:08 pm

Getting a deferral is rare. Getting a nonbinding deferral is even rarer (in the case you want to keep your reapplication options open). Getting a deferral with scholarship (when you are asking for it and they aren't offering to you) is nigh unheard of.

If you want the sure thing, then ask for a USC deferral with the scholarship (they may or may not give it to you). If they say no then just reapply. No offense, you probably didn't know this beforehand, but applying with intention to defer is usually a much worse idea than just waiting to apply later. If you don't get it then reapply (heck, maybe even retake the LSAT if you have the time for it).

sanrenxing
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:24 pm

Re: Should I withdraw?

Postby sanrenxing » Mon Mar 28, 2011 4:14 pm

bk1 wrote:Getting a deferral is rare. Getting a nonbinding deferral is even rarer (in the case you want to keep your reapplication options open). Getting a deferral with scholarship (when you are asking for it and they aren't offering to you) is nigh unheard of.

If you want the sure thing, then ask for a USC deferral with the scholarship (they may or may not give it to you). If they say no then just reapply. No offense, you probably didn't know this beforehand, but applying with intention to defer is usually a much worse idea than just waiting to apply later. If you don't get it then reapply (heck, maybe even retake the LSAT if you have the time for it).


I actually wouldn't mind a binding deferral, but yeah, I know what you're saying.

No offense taken. I really did research before applying to law school, but more into the schools themselves/application process than deferring. And at that point I was more on the fence about wanting to defer whereas now I very much feel that it's necessary for me to do well. Part of me regrets applying this year, but I needed to know my options in order to know what I would do next year... For instance, if I knew I'd be taking on UT at sticker then why not go live in Austin for a year, have a more lucrative job and try and get residency. It's tough, but it's my fault that I'm in this situation.

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bk1
Posts: 18407
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:06 pm

Re: Should I withdraw?

Postby bk1 » Mon Mar 28, 2011 4:29 pm

sanrenxing wrote:I actually wouldn't mind a binding deferral, but yeah, I know what you're saying.

No offense taken. I really did research before applying to law school, but more into the schools themselves/application process than deferring. And at that point I was more on the fence about wanting to defer whereas now I very much feel that it's necessary for me to do well. Part of me regrets applying this year, but I needed to know my options in order to know what I would do next year... For instance, if I knew I'd be taking on UT at sticker then why not go live in Austin for a year, have a more lucrative job and try and get residency. It's tough, but it's my fault that I'm in this situation.


Unless for some reason apps are really competitive next year, I don't think reapplying will bear very different results (though it will be a pain to write new statements) except at schools where you are on the edge. Be nice/considerate in your withdrawal and deferral requests and maybe even submit an addendum explaining why you didn't take the offer this year so that they aren't as hesitant that you won't attend if admitted.

dreadlawks
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:25 pm

Re: Should I withdraw?

Postby dreadlawks » Mon Mar 28, 2011 4:34 pm

I'm not sure about the ease of requesting deferrals at top schools. I deferred at a tier 2 (bottom 50) with virtually no problem to work and save up to pay for the remainder.

would it be out of the question to mention the following outright to USC?
1) that you are considering to defer so that you can help defray the cost of attending by working for a year and
2) the $ amount that it would take for you to start this fall

fwiw, I know nothing about what it takes to negotiate with law schools for more money, but I've always heard that whenever seeking compensation of some sort from an entity, it's good to state in plain English what you want and why.

At best, they confirm to bump your scholarship up by anything less than the full amount requested, which still sets you up well enough to defer since they did not give you the full amount. Second best, they confirm to give you the amount requested, in which case it may look bad to defer then (though I'm not too sure how much I would care if the amount was confirmed without your having to commit to this year). At worst, they give you nothing and you're on your way to workin for a year to save up.

In general, I'd choose to leverage other schools based on where my numbers fall in comparison to last year's incoming class at the school you wish to attend.




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