Scholarship Stipulations

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flexityflex86
Posts: 973
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 6:06 pm

Scholarship Stipulations

Postby flexityflex86 » Mon Mar 21, 2011 4:35 pm

Hi, I'm writing on behalf of a former student of mine. I've done some LSAT tutoring, and one of my students improved their score about 20 points with me.

She has been offered some 1/2 and 3/4 scholarships to decently ranked schools with stipulations including things like top 40 or top 50 percent. This is normally not that bad or that difficult, but a former professor of mine and top 5 law school grad who has been a published academic writer for quite some time worked with her through me to edit her personal statement.

He did not have very nice things to say about her, and told me that I was an incredible tutor to get her the LSAT score she got - even asking if I helped her cheat, half jokingly/half serious. It is his contention from the student's writing and her brief conversations with him that she will struggle in any of these law schools, and be in the bottom quartile.

I am a 0L at this point and lack the teaching experience he has so in properly advising her (I do not hide the fact I have no credentials to advise anyone other than being fiscally responsible), I am concerned about her taking one of these scholarships and relying on them to get by.

Is the smart response taking a big scholarship contingent on this performance to a tier-2 or taking the same scholly with no stipulations to a t-4? I have formed a friendship with this student, and am concerned about her coming out jobless in heavy debt.

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Knock
Posts: 5152
Joined: Wed Jun 10, 2009 3:09 pm

Re: Scholarship Stipulations

Postby Knock » Mon Mar 21, 2011 4:37 pm

flexityflex86 wrote:Hi, I'm writing on behalf of a former student of mine. I've done some LSAT tutoring, and one of my students improved their score about 20 points with me.

She has been offered some 1/2 and 3/4 scholarships to decently ranked schools with stipulations including things like top 40 or top 50 percent. This is normally not that bad or that difficult, but a former professor of mine and top 5 law school grad who has been a published academic writer for quite some time worked with her through me to edit her personal statement.

He did not have very nice things to say about her, and told me that I was an incredible tutor to get her the LSAT score she got - even asking if I helped her cheat, half jokingly/half serious. It is his contention from the student's writing and her brief conversations with him that she will struggle in any of these law schools, and be in the bottom quartile.

I am a 0L at this point and lack the teaching experience he has so in properly advising her (I do not hide the fact I have no credentials to advise anyone other than being fiscally responsible), I am concerned about her taking one of these scholarships and relying on them to get by.

Is the smart response taking a big scholarship contingent on this performance to a tier-2 or taking the same scholly with no stipulations to a t-4? I have formed a friendship with this student, and am concerned about her coming out jobless in heavy debt.


Tell her to try and negotiate away the stipulations, sometimes schools will remove them. Did she not get any scholarships without stipulations besides a T4? Scholarships with stipulations are something to be worried about, because no one knows where someone will end up in a class.

But anyways, just because a guy is a T5 grad with impressive credentials doesn't mean he can predict a student's grades. No one can read a personal statement and say that someone would be at the bottom of a class.

flexityflex86
Posts: 973
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 6:06 pm

Re: Scholarship Stipulations

Postby flexityflex86 » Mon Mar 21, 2011 4:43 pm

Knock wrote:
flexityflex86 wrote:Hi, I'm writing on behalf of a former student of mine. I've done some LSAT tutoring, and one of my students improved their score about 20 points with me.

She has been offered some 1/2 and 3/4 scholarships to decently ranked schools with stipulations including things like top 40 or top 50 percent. This is normally not that bad or that difficult, but a former professor of mine and top 5 law school grad who has been a published academic writer for quite some time worked with her through me to edit her personal statement.

He did not have very nice things to say about her, and told me that I was an incredible tutor to get her the LSAT score she got - even asking if I helped her cheat, half jokingly/half serious. It is his contention from the student's writing and her brief conversations with him that she will struggle in any of these law schools, and be in the bottom quartile.

I am a 0L at this point and lack the teaching experience he has so in properly advising her (I do not hide the fact I have no credentials to advise anyone other than being fiscally responsible), I am concerned about her taking one of these scholarships and relying on them to get by.

Is the smart response taking a big scholarship contingent on this performance to a tier-2 or taking the same scholly with no stipulations to a t-4? I have formed a friendship with this student, and am concerned about her coming out jobless in heavy debt.


Tell her to try and negotiate away the stipulations, sometimes schools will remove them. Did she not get any scholarships without stipulations besides a T4? Scholarships with stipulations are something to be worried about, because no one knows where someone will end up in a class.

But anyways, just because a guy is a T5 grad with impressive credentials doesn't mean he can predict a student's grades. No one can read a personal statement and say that someone would be at the bottom of a class.

That's what I thought, but as someone in the 170s with relatively little studying, I will openly admit this particular individual is head and shoulders farrrrrrr more intelligent than I am. They also have a decade of teaching experience so their opinion is not unwarranted.

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thecilent
Posts: 2506
Joined: Sat Dec 12, 2009 4:55 pm

Re: Scholarship Stipulations

Postby thecilent » Mon Mar 21, 2011 4:48 pm

flexityflex86 wrote:
Knock wrote:
flexityflex86 wrote:Hi, I'm writing on behalf of a former student of mine. I've done some LSAT tutoring, and one of my students improved their score about 20 points with me.

She has been offered some 1/2 and 3/4 scholarships to decently ranked schools with stipulations including things like top 40 or top 50 percent. This is normally not that bad or that difficult, but a former professor of mine and top 5 law school grad who has been a published academic writer for quite some time worked with her through me to edit her personal statement.

He did not have very nice things to say about her, and told me that I was an incredible tutor to get her the LSAT score she got - even asking if I helped her cheat, half jokingly/half serious. It is his contention from the student's writing and her brief conversations with him that she will struggle in any of these law schools, and be in the bottom quartile.

I am a 0L at this point and lack the teaching experience he has so in properly advising her (I do not hide the fact I have no credentials to advise anyone other than being fiscally responsible), I am concerned about her taking one of these scholarships and relying on them to get by.

Is the smart response taking a big scholarship contingent on this performance to a tier-2 or taking the same scholly with no stipulations to a t-4? I have formed a friendship with this student, and am concerned about her coming out jobless in heavy debt.


Tell her to try and negotiate away the stipulations, sometimes schools will remove them. Did she not get any scholarships without stipulations besides a T4? Scholarships with stipulations are something to be worried about, because no one knows where someone will end up in a class.

But anyways, just because a guy is a T5 grad with impressive credentials doesn't mean he can predict a student's grades. No one can read a personal statement and say that someone would be at the bottom of a class.

That's what I thought, but as someone in the 170s with relatively little studying, I will openly admit this particular individual is head and shoulders farrrrrrr more intelligent than I am. They also have a decade of teaching experience so their opinion is not unwarranted.

What? That doesn't make any sense.




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