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Negotiating Scholarships question

Posted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 4:58 pm
by miazdc
I am starting to draft letters in which I'll negotiate scholarships. I'm intending to ask a few schools for more money AND to ask to negotiate the stipulations of their scholarships (ie, a class rank or GPA stipulation). I know that this is overly ambitious, but for some of these schools, I certainly wont attend without significantly more money, so I feel that I have nothing to lose. My question is this:

Should I ask for both of these things in the same letter? Or should I first write one letter asking for more money, and then if my request is granted, write a new letter later asking to change the stipulation?


Thanks, input it appreciated!

Re: Negotiating Scholarships question

Posted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:35 pm
by miazdc
crickets. anybody?

Re: Negotiating Scholarships question

Posted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:40 pm
by JakeL
Well, if you aren't going to attend without getting what you want, why not go for the home run?

Re: Negotiating Scholarships question

Posted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:41 pm
by northwood
id do it in one letter. 2 letters may make you seem greedy- and its extra work for you.

ask for it all, then be prepared to negotiate.

Re: Negotiating Scholarships question

Posted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:04 pm
by miazdc
thanks for the advice!

Re: Negotiating Scholarships question

Posted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:13 pm
by duckmoney
Scholarship negotiation seems to depend a lot on the school. Most school's scholarships are formulaic and predictable, and the other schools know each others' formulas. Unless you get something above your numbers or get a special separate application scholarship (for instance, USC's Rothman or Emory's Woodruff), you might have trouble negotiating if the school isn't feeling generous.

But hey, can't hurt.

Re: Negotiating Scholarships question

Posted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:18 pm
by Arelikefoxes
Also, sometimes they will not be willing to negotiate now, as they have either not fully offered everyone (and are therefore hesitant to offer more), or else have already committed all of their financial aid offers.

Your best chance at increasing your fin aid is actually probably after the first deposit (so long as you are willing to deposit at several schools.) That way, you wait until they might have gotten money back from those that elected to go elsewhere, and you have demonstrated a concrete level of interest/commitment to the school. I had a lot of success with this, and I think it would be particularly useful in removing stips, so long as they are not institutionally mandated.