Regional/National Breaking Point in Secondary Markets?

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buckmulligan58
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Joined: Fri Feb 05, 2010 1:52 pm

Regional/National Breaking Point in Secondary Markets?

Postby buckmulligan58 » Wed Mar 03, 2010 6:34 pm

I have a specific question about secondary markets that might have broader appeal. Due to family/general preference, I would like to live in Ohio, preferably Cincy area. I am in at Cincinnati and Ohio St and pending at the usual Big Ten suspects ranked in the 20-40 range. T14 is pretty much out of the question. My question is this: is there any real reason to go to a better school than Cincy/Ohio State if I want to work in Ohio? Even if T14 was an option (which it's not given my GPA), would it be worth it if I just wanted to work in a secondary market? In other words, would a degree from, say, NU always trump a degree from Ohio St., even in Ohio?

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Aberzombie1892
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Joined: Sun Mar 29, 2009 10:56 am

Re: Regional/National Breaking Point in Secondary Markets?

Postby Aberzombie1892 » Wed Mar 03, 2010 6:45 pm

buckmulligan58 wrote:I have a specific question about secondary markets that might have broader appeal. Due to family/general preference, I would like to live in Ohio, preferably Cincy area. I am in at Cincinnati and Ohio St and pending at the usual Big Ten suspects ranked in the 20-40 range. T14 is pretty much out of the question. My question is this: is there any real reason to go to a better school than Cincy/Ohio State if I want to work in Ohio? Even if T14 was an option (which it's not given my GPA), would it be worth it if I just wanted to work in a secondary market? In other words, would a degree from, say, NU always trump a degree from Ohio St., even in Ohio?


Yes. Generally, "higher ranked" schools will get you back to secondary markets at which you have connections with a little more of a buffer for your GPA.

Your ties with strengthen you position (I'm assuming you have ties)

For example,

If you were from MS, you could attend Emory and return there in be in relatively higher demand than your homestate competitors of MS College and Ole Miss.

The same is true across the nation - however, I'm not convinced that it applies to public schools so much.

For example,

If you left Ohio and went to Wisconsin, I think that employers in Ohio would think you were foolish because you could have just stayed and attended Ohio but

if you went to Notre Dame, you would probably be in a pretty good position.




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