Is Florida A&M The worst law school in the country?

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achewood
Posts: 34
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 2:02 am

Re: Is Florida A&M The worst law school in the country?

Postby achewood » Wed Jun 13, 2012 2:58 pm

darknightbegins wrote:
starstruck393 wrote:It may be the worst ABA school, but there are definitely worse, unaccredited (state, not national, accreditation) schools out there...

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Alright if we are going non ABA...then this takes the cake.


Estimated Costs for the First Year
PCL Application Fee. 30
PCL First Year Courses (21 units) 4,000 (pay for 18, get 3 free)
Accountability Fee 600
State Bar Law Student Registration. 97
Books 270 ($90 for each class - approx)
First Year Law Student Exam . 513 (Subject to change)
Commercial Baby Bar Review 500 (Optional)
TOTAL..................................................... ............................................$5,983


Peoples College of Law is not really a place for anyone on this forum but it really doesn't deserve that bad of a rap

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Cosmic Zamboni
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 9:04 pm

Re: Is Florida A&M The worst law school in the country?

Postby Cosmic Zamboni » Tue Jun 26, 2012 7:41 pm

rad lulz wrote:If you've had a successful career and just need the slip of paper, that's one thing. Most law applicants don't have that luxury. For those people, you can't just "be entrepreneurial" and say start your own solo practice when law school doesn't teach you how to do anything.


Many people go to law school after acquiring significant experience in another field. Real experience in an industry, extensive contacts within and industry, etc. are real advantages to a newly graduated J.D. It has nothing to do with starting a practice, but it has to do with an entrepreneurial mindset. Working in silicon valley startup environments was something I thrived at. Now I'm in central Florida. What law schools are in central Florida? Well, not top 100 schools, that's for sure. But for my purposes, a J.D. is what I seek. There are many people who work at significant careers prior to getting a law degree. There are also a great many people who seek their J.D. with no intention of actually taking the bar exam or working as a lawyer. My own great-uncle was a real estate developer. Got his J.D. and never had any intention of sitting for the bar exam. His legal education was invaluable to his business pursuits, however.

Everyone has their own needs. No need to ridicule any particular school. Everything has its purpose, and a bright student can get a good education at any competent school. But there are indeed an awful lot of people in serious financial trouble because of massive debt incurred just to get a J.D. Sure, if your near the top of your class from a handful of schools there's no real need to worry. How many people does that apply to?

rad lulz
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Re: Is Florida A&M The worst law school in the country?

Postby rad lulz » Tue Jun 26, 2012 7:49 pm

Cosmic Zamboni wrote:Everyone has their own needs. No need to ridicule any particular school. Everything has its purpose, and a bright student can get a good education at any competent school. But there are indeed an awful lot of people in serious financial trouble because of massive debt incurred just to get a J.D. Sure, if your near the top of your class from a handful of schools there's no real need to worry. How many people does that apply to?

Have you seen the employment stats? They're worthy of ridicule. I think you're overestimating the amount of people who go to law school with no intention of practicing law. As someone in law school with a lot of friends in other law schools, it's not very many. At least FAMU is cheap if you're in-state.

Excellent117
Posts: 194
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 4:44 pm

Re: Is Florida A&M The worst law school in the country?

Postby Excellent117 » Tue Jun 26, 2012 8:54 pm

Not related to Florida A&M (only insofar as we are discussing s****y law schools); but this is from a recent WSJ article highlighting the problem of post-grad employment that recent law graduates face:

---Thomas Jefferson School of Law, in San Diego, reported that about 27% of its 2011 graduates had full-time, long-term legal jobs nine months after graduation, according to the data. The 2010 data reported in U.S. News showed more than 68% were employed nine months out.

"You can't measure the value of a law degree in terms of what your employment number was nine months after graduation," says Dean Rudy Hasl. A graduate who takes the California bar exam in July, he says, won't get the results until late November. Many employers won't even interview a graduate who hasn't been licensed, Mr. Hasl says, adding that he advises prospective students to consider the law degree a long-term investment. "The law degree is something that allows you to move in so many directions," he says."---

A statement like that from the dean has to put Thomas Jefferson up there in contention with Florida A&M...




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